UT College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences News

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Legendary: Dean Early to be honored by local nonprofit

Author and entrepreneur Steve Saint once said, “Your story is the greatest legacy that you will leave to your friends. It’s the longest-lasting legacy you will leave to your heirs.”

In this spirit, Dean Early adds his story to that of the African American Legacy Project, a local nonprofit that is dedicated to “documenting and preserving the history of Northwest Ohio’s African American communities and their impact and influence upon Toledo and the greater world community”.

This fall, the AALP will honor Dr. Early with its Legend Award, recognizing his achievements in leadership, service and academia as part of Toledo’s history. Nominated for his decades-long career as a pharmacy dean as well as his ongoing service to the pharmacy and African American communities, Dr. Early lives his commitment to diversity and student success. His story, which carried him from humble beginnings in a small Georgia town to national leadership positions in pharmacy organizations, is indeed worthy of recognition.

“I am honored to receive this recognition,” Dr. Early said. Most important to my personal legacy are student-centeredness, global outreach and diversity, all of which are cornerstones of our college’s mission and goals.”

Dr. Early will be recognized alongside three other honorees at a gala celebration on October 3-4, 2014.

To learn more about AALP or to place an advertisement in the program for the gala event, visit africanamericanlegacy.org.

 


July 2014 Refill e-newsletter

The July 2014 issue of Refill, the e-newsletter of The University of Toledo College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, is now available online.

In this issue:

  • The College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences celebrates 110 years of excellence
  • Recap of the 47th Annual Mid-Atlantic Graduate Student Symposium in Medicinal Chemistry by Aparna Raghavan
  • Student research presentations at ISPOR, ASBMB and NYSCC meetings
  • Chinese scholars study and share at UT
  • Staff Development Retreat
  • 17th Annual Infectious Disease Update: September 10, 2014
  • Alumnus Phil Miller earns highest honor

March 2014 Refill e-newsletter

The March 2014 issue of Refill, the e-newsletter of The University of Toledo College of Pharmacy
and Pharmaceutical Sciences, is now available online.

In this issue:

  • Agreement Signing with Al-Zaytoonah Private University of Jordan
  • Cosmetic Science program hosts seminar series
  • The Real World: Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences
  • CD3 Symposium
  • Upcoming Events

February 2014 Refill e-newsletter

The February 2014 issue of Refill, the e-newsletter of The University of Toledo College of Pharmacy
and Pharmaceutical Sciences, is now available online.

In this issue:

  • Script Your Future
  • Love Connection
  • Life After the BSPS degree
  • Dr. Cappelletty’s Shining Star Award
  • Saine ’79 honored by ISMP
  • Award for UT SNPhA chapter
  • UT research at APhA meeting
  • Rx Impact and Pharmacy Advocacy
  • March 11, 2014 Law CE Registration

A shift toward e-prescribing

AJMC Study: More Than Half Now Write “e-prescriptions”

More than half of those who write prescriptions today do so electronically, according to a study published this month in The American Journal of Managed Care. The increase is nearly eight times the number who were writing e-prescriptions just four years ago, the study found.

The jump comes after a federal law that took effect in 2009, which provided incentives for Medicare providers to write prescriptions electronically. E-prescriptions are encouraged to eliminate medical errors and improve patient medication adherence. For the full study, click here.

Led by Meghan H. Gabriel, PhD, of the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT in Washington, D.C., and co-authored by Varun Vaidya, PhD, from The University of Toledo College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, researchers studied the rise in e-prescription use from December 2008 to December 2012 by examining data from Surescripts. This leading e-prescription network serves more than 240 million patients nationwide through most chain, franchise and independent pharmacies. Data revealed that during the study period, the share of doctors, nurse practitioners and physician assistants who used e-prescriptions jumped from 7 percent to 54 percent; or 47,000 to 398,000. The share of prescriptions written electronically rose from 4 percent to an estimated 45 percent over the same period, with 86 percent of prescribers using electronic health records (EHRs).

Meanwhile, the share of pharmacies able to accept e-prescriptions rose as well. At the start of the study period, 70 percent or 43,000 pharmacies could accept electronic prescriptions, and by December 2012, 24 percent or 59,000 were able to do so.

The study described changes in federal law that provided incentives for physicians and pharmacies to convert to e-prescriptions, as well as grants that helped rural communities close technological gaps. In 2008, only 61 percent of rural pharmacies could take e-prescriptions, compared to 75 percent of urban pharmacies. By 2012, this gap had closed (93 percent of rural and 94 percent of urban pharmacies could take e-prescriptions).

In 2003, Congress passed the Medicare Modernization Act, which was followed by federal regulations and changes to state laws in 2006 that allowed exchanges of electronic information. In 2008, Congress passed the Medicare Improvements for Patients and Providers Act (MIPPA), which provided incentives to Medicare providers to use e-prescriptions.


Meet Dr. Julie Murphy

Dr. Murphy with residents

Dr. Murphy with residents

Dr. Julie Murphy is a Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice and a Clinical Pharmacist at the UT Medical Center. She serves as a preceptor for both student pharmacists and PGY1 pharmacy residents completing their internal medicine rotations.

An alumnus (1998/2001) of the College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Dr. Murphy completed a clinical pharmacy residency in Internal Medicine with the St. Louis College of Pharmacy and Forest Park Hospital in St. Louis, MO.  She then joined the faculty at St. Louis College of Pharmacy and served as a faculty member there for ten years.

Dr. Murphy has authored a plethora of publications relating to patient care and pharmacy education. Her expertise in these areas has earned her several awards, including the 2012 Mentor of the Year Award from the American College of Clinical Pharmacy Adult Medicine Practice and Research Network, 2011 Faculty Teacher of the Year from the Mercy Family Medicine Residency Program, 2009 Pharmacist of the Year bestowed by the Missouri Society of Health-System Pharmacists, and the 2009 Best Practice Award presented by the Missouri Society of Health-System Pharmacists Research and Education Foundation. Dr. Murphy is a Fellow with the American College of Clinical Pharmacy and the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists. Her certifications include the ACCP Leadership and Management Certificate, the ACCP Teaching and Learning Certificate, and Pharmacotherapy Board Certification.

“When I started my journey at the University of Toledo in 1993,” said Dr. Murphy, “the College of Pharmacy was located within University Hall on the main campus.  When I was earning my 2-year post-BS PharmD degree, the college was housed in Wolfe Hall.  Now as a faculty member, I have the chance to work within the Frederic and Mary Wolfe Center.  With being located on the Health Science Campus, the opportunities for both student pharmacists and faculty to learn and discover are truly limitless.”


Mortar & Pestle Society

mortar and pestle photoThe Mortar & Pestle Society was established to help The University of Toledo College of Pharmacy & Pharmaceutical Sciences meet its educational mission and its role in the profession and the community at large. In these times of dwindling public resources, the annual gifts of the Mortar & Pestle Society members are critical to college programs and continued excellence. Member gifts provide essential funds for scholarships, faculty research support, and programs. Members are regularly informed about important developments at the college and may also assist the college with their counsel.

Each member of the Mortar & Pestle Society agrees to a contribution of $10,000 payable to the College of Pharmacy & Pharmaceutical Sciences Annual Fund over 10 years or less. UT employees can make gifts of $1,000 per year payable over a maximum of ten years, and non-employees of UT can make their gifts of $2,000 per year over five years to the College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences.

Although most gifts are cash contributions, gifts of appreciable securities, stocks, bonds, or real estate are encouraged and can offer certain tax advantages to donors. Most gifts will be unrestricted, allowing the college to respond quickly to changing needs; however, members can also designate their contributions for specific programs if they so desire. One hundred percent of a member’s gift will be used for the sole benefit of the College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences and will constitute a charitable contribution and be tax-deductible to the extent allowed by law.

To learn more about membership in the Mortar & Pestle Society, contact Jeff Barton, development director, at 419.530.5413 or at jeffrey.barton@utoledo.edu.


2012 State of the College Address

At this year’s Donor Recognition and Scholarship Dinner, which recognizes students who have earned CPPS scholarships and honors the donors who established the scholarships, Dean Early presented the 2012 State of the College address, detailing the year’s accomplishments and challenges the college faces. Among the college’s significant achievements was the recent reaccreditation of the PharmD program with six commendations. The college was among the first in the nation to earn an eight-year accreditation cycle instead of six years, which was once the maximum. In addition to this achievement, two new academic programs will be offered by the college, the PhD in Experimental Therapeutics and the Cosmetic Science major in the B.S. in Pharmaceutical Sciences program.

See the college’s 2012 Annual Executive Report and Summary


September 2011 Refill e-newsletter

The September 2011 Refill is now available online. Please enjoy news from the UT College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences (UTCPPS).

In this issue:

  • Pharmacy Summer Camp takes on crime
  • Pillbox Pharmacy Tailgate Tent, Fall 2011
  • UTCPPS and Free Clinic
  • Alumni Focus: Kayleigh Majercek, BSPS ‘10
  • Student Features: Learning from Experts
  • Faculty Notes: Drs. Ahmed and Lengel
  • Upcoming Events

Frederic and Mary Wolfe Center Dedication

Frederic and Mary Wolfe Center

The University of Toledo will dedicate the Frederic and Mary Wolfe Center on Health Science Campus at 11 a.m. Friday, June 24.   See video clips

The ceremony will be held at the site of the center, located between the Block Science and Health Education buildings.

Home to the College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, the Frederic and Mary Wolfe Center is a $25 million LEED-certified (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) facility that includes laboratories, lecture halls and offices.

The dedication will honor the Wolfes for their $2.5 million donation in support of diabetes research at the University through the Center for Diabetes and Endocrine Research, a collaboration between the College of Medicine and Life Sciences and the College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences.

UT’s Center for Diabetes and Endocrine Research is the only comprehensive diabetes research center in the state. The death rate in Ohio related to diabetes and its complications is twice as high as the national average and four times higher for African Americans, and Hispanic and Native-American women. The latest research available from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows a 10.1 percent incidence of diabetes among adults in Lucas County, which translates into more than $35 million in Medicaid expenditures. The cost to Ohio employers in lost productivity is even higher. Diabetes has a major impact on the local economy; more than one million Ohioans have diabetes, and 33,000 of them live in Toledo.

A major objective of the Center for Diabetes and Endocrine Research is to establish a strong investigative base led by Dr. Sonia Najjar, director of the center and professor of physiology and pharmacology in the College of Medicine and Life Sciences, and Dr. Marcia McInerney, professor and chair of medicinal and biological chemistry in the College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences.

Najjar and McInerney have shared grant funds several times and have focused their research on dietary and genetic risk factors in obesity and diabetes. Therapeutic strategies will include medicinal approaches at the College of Pharmacy and gene delivery programs at the College of Medicine.

“This relationship has placed The University of Toledo on the map as an institution that is committed to be an active participant in the discovery process that will lead to stemming the tide of the diabetic epidemic,” said Dr. Johnnie Early, dean of the College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences.

Najjar said the Wolfes’ gift will provide much-needed support to maintain the excellence of the Center for Diabetes and Endocrine Research, allowing for growing its reach by increasing capabilities and leveraging its existing resources to increase competitiveness in successfully applying for further federal and pharmaceutical funding.

“This generous gift is a recognition of the progress made in fostering local talents and attracting leading investigators nationwide to join our research program,” Najjar said. “The gift will enable us to maintain our national and international profile in diabetes research, prevention and treatment.”

UT President Lloyd Jacobs will join Chancellor Jeffrey P. Gold and Early for a brief ceremony.

“Frederic Wolfe, an honorary degree recipient and longtime supporter of the College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, has had a tremendous impact on health care in Ohio,” Early said, noting that Wolfe Hall on Main Campus is named in honor of Frederic and Mary Wolfe.

Early added that The University of Toledo is pleased to have a long and fruitful relationship with the Wolfe family.

“The commitment the Wolfe family has shown to diabetes treatment and to pharmacy education is quite special. Our college is proud to reside in two buildings — on two different campuses — that bear the Wolfe name,” he said.

The free, public dedication ceremony will be followed by a reception and tours of the Wolfe Center.