UT College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences News

Posts Tagged ‘medicinal chemistry’

Leaning In

Hassoun, Wall, McInerney, Mauro and Hinko

Hassoun, Wall, McInerney, Mauro and Hinko

The past year has brought considerable change and reorganization to the leadership team of the College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. Through retirements and promotions, excellent leaders like Drs. Wayne Hoss, retired executive associate dean, and Bill Messer, former chair of the Department of Pharmacology and new Director of Research for UT, have moved on to other endeavors. The leaders who have risen in their places bring unique perspectives to their roles in the college because of their varied experiences. Among their assets is the diversity they add by virtue of being female in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) fields. While many studies note the gender gap in STEM fields, the influx of women leaders in the College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences presents a promising future.

Dr. Christine Hinko has added the title of executive associate dean to her dossier. Currently in her fifteenth year as associate dean for student affairs, she is eager to serve the college in a new capacity.

“I have been privileged to work with many students who are pursuing their goal of becoming pharmacists or pharmaceutical scientists,” said Hinko. “Most rewarding for me is witnessing a student who has encountered academic or personal obstacles persist to overcome them and be successful.”

As executive associate dean, Dr. Hinko is working with longtime colleagues who comprise the new leadership team for the College.  She is excited to see their growth and development as leaders.

“The reorganization places each of us in different leadership roles and provides us with the opportunity to use our strengths cooperatively for the betterment of our students and the college,” Dr. Hinko added.

Dr. Marcia McInerney, former chair of the Department of Medicinal Chemistry, is the associate dean for research and graduate programs. As a diabetes researcher, Dr. McInerney secured $3 million in funding for her research and she took pride in nurturing new scientists who have since become successful researchers. She will extend these efforts as she works more closely with graduate students.

“This is a natural extension of my former roles, and I am committed to expanding and enhancing research and graduate education during my tenure,” said McInerney.

The college’s graduate programs – including the master’s degree in pharmaceutical sciences, the master’s and Ph.D. degrees in medicinal chemistry, and the new Ph.D. in experimental therapeutics – have seen increased enrollment in recent years.

Dr. Laurie Mauro’s new role as the assistant dean for assessment allows her to focus on the academic preparation of the college’s graduates, and her considerable experience as a practitioner contributes to her insight.

“It is extremely rewarding to see our graduates practice successfully in a wide variety of pharmacy practice roles.  They are effectively contributing to the care of patients in hospital, long-term care, ambulatory, and community settings, and they impact patient care broadly by serving in colleges, industry, and professional organizations” said Dr. Mauro.  “The practice of pharmacy is dynamic and requires continual change in program content and instruction.  I look forward to ensuring that our programs continue to evolve and prepare graduates to optimally contribute to patient care as they shape the practice of pharmacy and lead the profession.”

Also part of the leadership team are Dr. Ezdihar Hassoun, the new chair of the Department of Pharmacology, and Dr. Kathy Wall, chair of the Department of Medicinal Chemistry. Dr. Early, dean of the College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, is pleased to lead a college that respects and welcomes diversity in all its forms. “The amalgamation of our many viewpoints enriches our college tremendously,” he said.

Dr. Amanda Bryant-Friedrich, associate professor of medicinal chemistry, believes the women leaders in the college can be excellent mentors for students. The women serving on the college’s leadership team also reflect the data that pharmacy and the pharmaceutical sciences are among the most auspicious career choices for women. As president of the Northwest Ohio Chapter of the Association for Women in Science and chair of the organization’s diversity task force, Dr. Bryant-Friedrich has an interest in seeing more women in science fields, particularly in leadership roles.

“It is a positive sign of the CPPS commitment to diversity and inclusion to see the recent appointment of several women in visible leadership positions.  Their appointments provide role models to the women in the college currently pursuing degrees as well as those in junior faculty positions,” said Dr. Bryant-Friedrich.  “This is a vital part of the equation to ensure the advancement of women in the STEM-related disciplines.”


College celebrates graduation of inaugural learners

Signing Ceremony 100On May 4, the morning of the college’s spring commencement exercises, the college hosted a special celebration recognizing the inaugural graduates of two new academic programs.

Three students—Kayla Banks, Sarah Breen and Alison Wery—were the first to complete the Cosmetic Science major in the B.S. in Pharmaceutical Sciences program.

Fernand “Mel” Bedi was the first to complete the PharmD/PhD dual-degree program, finishing his doctorate in medicinal chemistry after having earned the Doctor of Pharmacy degree in 2012.

The graduates and their families were congratulated by university administrators, college faculty and staff, and many guests.

During the celebratory luncheon, the students’ degrees were signed by hand by the deans of the College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences or the College of Graduate Studies, giving the students a unique opportunity to see and even hold their actual degrees before the documents are processed by the office of the registrar and mailed to them later this summer.


Recent grad to begin studies at Kansas University

Jordan Hunt, BSPS ’13, was accepted into the PhD program in medicinal chemistry at Kansas University and will complete a summer research experience there before beginning the program in the fall. At UT, he conducted research with Dr. James Slama, medicinal chemistry professor and director of the B.S. in Pharmaceutical Sciences program. Hunt joins the program as Alex Salyer, BSPS ‘12 is completing his studies there.  Salyer is researching metabolite profiling and pharmacokinetics for Toll-Like receptor ligands, and Jordan Hunt, BSPS ’13, was accepted into the PhD program in medicinal chemistry at Kansas University and will complete a summer research experience there before beginning the program in the fall. At UT, he conducted research with Dr. James Slama, medicinal chemistry professor and director of the B.S. in Pharmaceutical Sciences program. Hunt joins the program as Alex Salyer, BSPS ‘12 is completing his studies there.  Salyer is researching metabolite profiling and pharmacokinetics for Toll-Like receptor ligands, and evaluation of immune cell response to innate immune activation.

 


CD3 Symposium June 22, 2014

On June 22, 2014, the college will celebrate the 20th anniversary of the Center for Drug Design and Development (CD3) under the leadership of Distinguished University Professor Paul Erhardt. The Department of Medicinal and Biological Chemistry, the College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, and The University of Toledo are very happy to hold a one-day symposium to celebrate the achievements of Dr. Erhardt and hope that you will be able to join us on this occasion.

Faculty members and professionals are invited to give technical presentations as a part of the symposium.  These talks should be designed for an audience familiar with the fields of medicinal and biological chemistry.  All are welcome to attend.

The department is also accepting contributions to support this symposium. To contribute to the celebration in the form of talent, expertise or a monetary contribution, please contact Dr. Bryant-Friedrich or Dr. Tillekeratne so that you can be included in the program.

This celebration of the CD3 will begin with a lecture to be delivered by Dr. Christopher A. Lipinski, who will also act as a panelist for the 46th Annual Mid-Atlantic Graduate Student Symposium (MAGSS), a regional conference in medicinal chemistry, pharmacognosy and pharmaceutical sciences, which will be held from June 22-24 at The University of Toledo. Drs. Gunda Georg and Mukhund Chorghade will also present at the CD3 Symposium and MAGSS.

Visit the MAGSS website for more information about registering for or sponsoring MAGSS. This celebration of excellence is a milestone for research and drug development in the College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences.


Meet Dr. Isaac Schiefer

Dr. SchieferDr. Isaac Schiefer, BSPS ‘07, recently joined the Department of Medicinal and Biological Chemistry as a research assistant professor.

After earning his BS degree from UT, he entered the medicinal chemistry PhD program at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Dr. Schiefer credits his extensive laboratory research experience at UT with his success in getting into graduate school with a full ride. After completing his PhD, he completed a post-doctoral fellowship at Northwestern University. His research is focused on drug discovery and finding treatments for  Alzheimer’s, ALS and stroke.

Dr. Schiefer’s favorite aspect of research is the independence it allows. “If I have a question,” he says, “I can do more than look for an answer; I can design an experiment to find the answer.”

He appreciates the experience he gained at UT, along with the supportive and enthusiastic faculty. Looking back on his academic journey, he says, “I know I took the right path.”

 


Meet Dr. Amanda Bryant-Friedrich

Dr. Bryant-Friedrich, center, with students in her lab

Dr. Bryant-Friedrich, center, with students in her lab

Dr. Amanda Bryant-Friedrich, associate professor of Medicinal and Biological Chemistry, loves working with students.  Since joining the CPPS in 2007 she has mentored seven graduate students from six different countries as well as almost twenty undergraduates.  These students have made enormous contributions to the work in the Bryant-Friedrich lab, focused on understanding the role of oxidative damage in cancer development at a molecular level. Their efforts have been rewarded through numerous publications and presentations at national and international meetings.

In addition to her dedication to the training of students, her leadership role as president of the Northwest Ohio Chapter of the Association for Women in Science (AWIS) is an example of her strong advocacy for diversity in the sciences.

“The active recruitment and retention of members of all groups represented in our world in STEM fields is key to maintaining the competitive advantage our country has enjoyed for so long.  This includes young students of color from the city of Toledo as well as women who have limited opportunities in the far corners of the globe,” says Dr. Bryant-Friedrich.

Dr. Bryant-Friedrich plans to continue to actively recruit from these diverse populations as she continues her work in cancer etiology and embarks on new projects to design and develop new anti-viral agents.


New BS/MS degree in Medicinal Chemistry

chemistry image2012 welcomed the college’s first students into the BS/MS in Medicinal Chemistry program. Students in this new program have the opportunity to complete both a BS and an MS degree in five calendar years.

Students in the B.S. in Pharmaceutical Sciences program have the option of completing some of the graduate course work during their junior and senior years as part of this accelerated program.

These students, who complete a required research internship during the summer after the junior year, continue their research with the same mentor during the graduate portion of the program.  This offers undergraduate students who intend to pursue graduate studies an additional option for continuing their research with the faculty of the College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences.