UT College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences News

Posts Tagged ‘pharmacy’

Alumni Advice for the Incoming P1 Class

In their address at spring Convocation, 2018 PharmD valedictorians Drs. Emily To and Corissa Piatka shared memories about the journey through pharmacy school. This week, the college welcomes its new class of P1 students, and their sage advice is a great reminder to cherish the journey.

On to the Next

Drs. Corissa Piatka and Emily To, 2018 PharmD Valedictorians

When Emily and I first started to think of ideas for this address, we were not really sure where we were going with it. We struggled with the ideas of how sentimental or emotional it should be. We were worried that our attempt to be motivational would fall completely flat. The question of what theme to use was asked multiple times. We then turned to the two most commonly used, non-LexiComp resources of pharmacy students: our own experiences and Google.

The Google search terms of “greatest college commencement speeches” returned about 1.4 million results. We sifted through the first few links of Top 10 lists. Some of the common names on these lists were Admiral William McRaven, the Obamas, Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos and author JK Rowling. But the address that stood out to us most was that of Steve Jobs, who spoke to the Stanford Class of 2005. This highly quoted speech contained many lessons and a lot of advice applicable to graduating students.  But the advice that stood out to us most was this:

“You can’t connect the dots looking forward; you can only connect them looking backward. So you have to trust that the dots will somehow connect in your future.”

This idea definitely resonated with us. Reflecting on the entirety of our pharmacy experience, we can see many dots.

Some of those dots are highly sequenced. Looking back, the progression is very clear.

We went from learning how to navigate LexiComp to finding clinical trials on PubMed. We evaluated those single PubMed trials in our SET tables and, before we knew it, successfully delivered an entire seminar project.

The SIG codes “BID”, “TID”, “QHS” all started as a foreign language. But they quickly became second nature as we progressed our way through compounding lab. Now, we are able to read prescriptions with ease and translate those codes into medication directions for our patients.

The towers of meds and terms flashcards were once enough to trigger a vasovagal response. Initially, we could not even pronounce the drug names. But our fluency in brand and generic names built up, along with our knowledge of side effects, dosing and formulations. We progressed to counseling patients on their medications and conducting comprehensive medication reviews.

APhA, SCCP, SSHP and AMCP, at one point, were just a mumbo jumbo of pharmacy alphabet soup.  With the help of our classmates and reassurance of upperclassmen, we pushed ourselves to run for an e-board position as a P1. By P3 year, we were president or chair and were a senior member of said e-board.

From IPPEs, we quickly progressed to APPEs.  And on our APPEs, we grew from rounding with our preceptor to rounding independently. The medical team began to ask US, the P4 intern, questions regarding patient care over our preceptor.

While these dots seemed to progress in a linear order, some of them represented stand-alone obstacles. We share many of these problem dots and were able to overcome them to push ourselves forward.

We found a way to make it to class when the Toledo streets were icy, pot holes attempted to demolish our cars, and there was absolutely no parking outside of Collier.

We stumbled through plenty of IRATS to realize how many questions we missed during the GRAT 5 minutes later.

We survived the eight minute Windows update just two minutes prior to an ExamSoft Exam. We managed our non-functioning clickers, and we learned where the functioning printers were. We handled coffee spills on our computers the day before assignments were due and the convenient Blackboard crash at the precise moment that we submitted an assignment.

There were times when we felt our procrastination or lack of discipline on an assignment was certainly the beginning of the end; a plummeting GPA was imminent. Perhaps you took comfort that your highly organized, Type A best friend had not started either….but you reached deep, forgot about sleep and pulled that assignment together.

Then, there were those horrific moments when your recommendation got rejected on rounds because you were simply wrong or when you completely missed a crucial lab value or culture result.

Finally, and maybe most importantly, are those dots and lines that we did not share in common. Events that were personal to our lives. Some were visible to others and some were not. Those regarding family, finances, health, relationships, and other aspects of our lives. It is these that most likely define our unique strengths and will influence our future directions in a way that we do not yet understand.

We are here today because we have all connected the dots up until this point.  We are now standing on the same collective dot of graduation. And it is now when things will greatly change.

We are all moving on to the “next dot” and they will be widely spread. No one’s “next dot” will be the same as anyone else’s. It is exciting, sad, exhilarating and scary all at the same time.

While it feels like you may be lost or wandering off your line as you move forward, you can certainly trust in a few things. First, trust in yourself. Appreciate all that you have made sense out of, overcome and accomplished during our journey here in pharmacy school. Take pride in the fact that you have connected a lot of dots. From this, you can trust that the unfamiliar, unpredictable present will eventually fall into order on the line forming behind you. Trust that your next venture will get you where you need and are meant to go.

In closing, thank you to all of those who have helped us on this journey. Thank you to our family and friends for your unconditional support and faith in us. Thank you to our professors and preceptors for your instruction and guidance. And thank you to our classmates. All of us helped to make the ordinary days more interesting, the bad days less discouraging, and the good days that much better. Thank you for your support of one another during these past six years and as we move on to the next.


Ohio’s pharmacy deans advocate for pharmacist reimbursements

Deans of Ohio’s colleges of pharmacy met with Senator Matt Dolan to discuss his bill, SB 265, which supports insurance reimbursements for pharmacists. The bill permits certain health insurers to provide payment or reimbursement for services lawfully provided by a pharmacist and to recognize pharmacist services in certain other laws.

The narrative of the meeting was around how majoring in pharmacy is a pathway towards the middle class and that pharmacists serve as pillars in many communities throughout Ohio.  The pharmacy deans are working on providing a white paper for Senator Dolan and members of each College’s legislative delegation.


PGY2 Critical Care Residency celebrates 20 years

The PGY2 Critical Care residency is celebrating its 20th year. The resident provides patient care services to the most critically ill patients of the University of Toledo Medical Center, while both serving as the senior resident mentoring the 12 PGY1 residents and representing UTMC on the Graduate Medical Education Senior Resident Forum. The Critical Care resident performs over 2,000 interventions annually, almost 10 per day, improving patient care by providing evidence-based recommendations to improve outcomes, educate multi-disciplinary learners, and promote the most cost-effective therapy.

The PGY2 Critical Care resident conducts and presents research, serves on committees and participates in quality improvement and patient care projects, in addition to clinical work that includes on-call coverage at UTMC. Within the College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, the resident is responsible for didactic teaching in the PharmD program, precepting Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience (IPPE) and Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience (APPE) students, and advising students in the PharmD Seminar.


Pharmacy Summer Camps Accepting Applications

Applications are now being accepted for the college’s summer camps. The Walgreens Pharmacy Practice Camp and the Shimadzu Pharmaceutical Science Camp, also supported by Amway, are open to high school students with an interest in pharmacy or research.

The Walgreens Pharmacy Practice Camp focuses on the profession of pharmacy, introducing students to the life of a pharmacy practitioner. Campers shadow pharmacists in various settings and participate in labs and presentations to familiarize them with the demands and rewards of pharmacy school. The camp has been sponsored by Walgreens for over a decade, and many of our alumni were first introduced to the profession through the camp experience.

The Shimadzu Pharmaceutical Science Camp, the college’s newest camp program, introduces students to the sciences that underlie pharmacy. Students are introduced to the college’s state-of-the-art research facilities through laboratory explorations, and they learn about the myriad career options available to pharmaceutical scientists. The camp is sponsored by Shimadzu, a leader in the production of scientific instruments, and supported by Amway.

For more information about the college’s Pharmacy Camps, please visit the Pharmacy Camp page on the college’s website.


Annual Golf Outing Registration Now Open

The Toledo Academy of Pharmacy/ University of Toledo College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences Annual Scholarship Golf Outing is fast approaching.  June 14th is right around the corner and we want to see you out on the greens! As in years past, this will be an 18 hole scramble and you will receive both a boxed lunch and a Shorty’s BBQ dinner.  Registration begins at 10:00with a shotgun start at 11:00. There will be contests, prizes, and an auction as well!  Not a golfer?  Come for the dinner only, sponsor a hole or students to play for the day, or make a donation to the Toledo Academy of Pharmacy Scholarship Fund!  We also have corporate sponsorship opportunities available as well.  Please click here to register today!

Thank you for your support!​

Tole​​do Academy of Pharmacy Golf Outing Committee


Measuring critical thinking and professionalism

Photo of Dr. Michael Peeters

Dr. Peeters

Dr. Michael Peeters (PharmD, MEd, FCCP, BCPS), a clinical senior lecturer in the Department of Pharmacy Practice, is a psychometrician with a research focus is pharmacy education and has a recent stream of papers on the assessment of cognitive development among PharmD students.

After writing a review article a number of years ago [Peeters MJ. Cognitive development of learners in pharmacy education. Curr Pharm Teach Learn. 2011; 3(3):224-229], Dr. Peeters helped develop and implement a program to assess UT PharmD students’ development in critical thinking. In preparation, he conducted literature searches and reviews within the pharmacy education and health professions education literature [Reale MC, Witt BA, Riche DM, Baker WL, Peeters MJ. Development of critical thinking among health professions students: a meta-analysis. Am J Pharm Educ. 2015; 79(5):article S4; Peeters MJ, Zitko KL, Vaidya VA. Critical thinking development in pharmacy education: a meta-analysis. Inov Pharm. 2016; 7(1): article 10].

The results of critical thinking development from these classes of PharmD student participants have recently been published [Peeters MJ, Boddu SHS. Assessing development of critical thinking: one institution’s experience. Curr Pharm Teach Learn. 2016; 8(3):271-278].

Of note, one critical thinking assessment that was used also measures professionalism. In the most recent Standards for PharmD education, the American Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) has required all PharmD education programs to assess their students’ professional development. Thus, the critical thinking assessment that also measures professionalism was used to help measure this important ACPE outcome as well. Along with documentation from teaching and learning of pharmacist professionalism and ethics (i.e., one of Dr. Peeters’ teaching roles), he presented these findings [Vaidya VA, Peeters MJ. Assessing professional development (Standard 4): the University of Toledo’s experience. Am J Pharm Educ. 2015; 79(5):article S4]—with a publication in the American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education. PharmD students at UTCPPS demonstrated development in their professionalism. Additionally, Dr. Peeters received an honorable mention within the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy’s 2016 Innovations in Teaching competition.


Spring 2017 Commencement and Convocation

The College has an important announcement regarding spring commencement and convocation. The dates and locations of Commencement-related events have changed. If you have already sent an RSVP for Commencement, you will need to complete a revised form.

Each year, both the College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences and The University of Toledo host commencement-related events. In recent years, the College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences has held Spring Commencement Exercises which included awards, hooding and speeches relevant to entry into careers in pharmacy and the pharmaceutical sciences in addition to the conferring of degrees, a part of the ceremony in which tassels are moved and the completed degree is declared.

The University of Toledo holds a broader general Commencement each year at which degrees are conferred and graduates’ names are called as they walk across the stage. Traditionally, students from our college have participated in the college’s Commencement rather than the University Commencement, although they could always elect to attend one or both; attendance has no effect on the awarding of the actual degree.

This year, the University is returning to the traditional commencement format.  The College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences will join the many other graduates from the university’s colleges across the Main and Health Science campuses in the University’s Commencement. Degrees will be conferred at this ceremony, and the traditional Pomp and Circumstance of commencement will welcome graduates and their families.

Since the college is not conferring degrees, the ceremony the college is hosting this year is called the Convocation and Awards Ceremony, as the college has held for most of its long history. At this ceremony, which will be held at Stranahan Theater in Toledo on Friday, May 5 at 5:30 p.m., the specific achievements of pharmacy and pharmaceutical science students will be recognized, and similar to Commencement, students and faculty will wear caps and gowns. Hooding for master’s and doctoral graduates will take place, and graduates will be able to select the faculty member who hoods them. The program for this event will also include valedictorian speeches from the B.S. in Pharmaceutical Sciences and Pharm.D. graduating classes.

Both events welcome graduates and their families to celebrate the achievements of the graduating class. The College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences hopes that you will enjoy both events as you celebrate the milestone of graduation.

Spring Commencement

This year’s Spring Commencement ceremony is scheduled for Sunday, May 7 at 10 a.m. in the University of Toledo Glass Bowl. All colleges will participate in this ceremony, with the exception of the College of Law and the College of Medicine & Life Sciences, who will host their own ceremonies.

Graduate and undergraduate degrees will be conferred during this commencement ceremony. Doctoral students will be hooded on the lower stage, and undergraduate students will walk across the lower stage, shake the hand of their dean and receive their diploma cover.  Images of the graduates will be displayed on the large Glass Bowl screens as they walk across the stage.

College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences Spring Convocation & Awards Ceremony

The College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences will hold a Convocation & Awards ceremony on Friday, May 5, 2017 at 5:30 p.m. at Stranahan Theater to celebrate the accomplishments of the Class of 2017. The program for Convocation will include caps and gowns, awards and valedictorian speeches. No degrees will be conferred during this event.

Contact

More information, including a link to the revised RSVP, can be found at http://www.utoledo.edu/pharmacy/current/graduation/graduation.html.

Please contact Cynthia Tierney, cynthia.tierney@utoledo.edu, with questions or concerns. P4 Pharm.D. students can address questions and concerns to Dr. Megan Kaun.


Jay Mirtallo receives 2016 Distinguished Alumnus Award

Jay Mirtallo and Dana Fitzsimmons

Jay Mirtallo ’76 and Dana Fitzsimmons ’76

The College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences selected Jay Mirtallo, BSP ’76, for the 2016 Distinguished Alumni Award. Mr. Mirtallo is considered to be one of the world’s pharmacy specialist pioneers. He has been instrumental in leading cost-effective practices in parenteral and enteral nutrition and advancing the role of the pharmacist in nutrition support services.

Parenteral nutrition, also known as intravenous feeding, and enteral nutrition, which delivers food to the gastrointestinal tract, are often essential to the life and health of children and adults with special medical needs.

The recipient of the Clinical Practice Award from the American College of Clinical Pharmacy in 2007, Mr. Mirtallo has focused his research comparative evaluations of amino acid injection products, the use of fat as a calorie source, parenteral nutrition compatibility and stability, and systems issues in the preparation, administration and management of parenteral nutrition.

Mr. Mirtallo has been a professor of clinical pharmacy and director of the Master of Science program in Health-System Pharmacy at Ohio State University in Columbus for 38 years. While he has made his mark in his field in research and teaching, he has also contributed through leadership and setting national policy.

Mr. Mirtallo served as president of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition in 2011, a 6,000 member organization made up of doctors, dieticians, nurses, pharmacists and scientists who are involved in providing clinical support to patients, and he advocated for reimbursement of enteral and parenteral nutrition in the hospital and home. As a representative to the Joint Commission on accreditation for health systems, he served on the task force that created the Nutrition Care Standards, and also he chaired a parenteral nutrition safety summit for the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, which led to the development of the safety consensus recommendations recently released by that organization and the American Society for Health System Pharmacists.

Mr. Mirtallo also recently co-authored an etiology-based definition of malnutrition which is the basis for an inter-professional malnutrition strategy that has been adapted by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. The new definition improves access to appropriate medical care for those suffering from malnutrition.

A native of the Catskills region in New York state, Mr. Mirtallo was enrolled in the pre-med program at Ohio State when he decided that pharmacy was really where he wanted to be.  He transferred to UT after looking at other schools and credits iconic pharmacy professor Dr. Bob Schlembach for the impact he made during his time at UT and in his career.


Student Society of Health-system Pharmacists receives national recognition

The University of Toledo chapter of Student Society of Health-system Pharmacists achieved recognition from the American Society of Health-system Pharmacists (ASHP) for 2016-17 academic year. The honor includes a certificate of recognition, a complimentary ASHP publication, awards for the incoming and outgoing student officers, and a complimentary student registration to the 2016 Midyear Clinical Meeting and 2017 Summer Meetings.


José Treviño displays his artistic talent in the college

Jose Trevino and Rocky the Pharmacist

Jose Trevino and Rocky the Pharmacist

Most students in the College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences know José Treviño for his role as Director of Transfer Services and Recruitment for the college’s Office of Student Affairs, but many don’t know how skillful he is with a chainsaw. About 15 years ago, he was inspired to create wood carvings by a friend who carved totem poles from large pieces of driftwood from Lake Erie.  Wood carving is a way for José to connect with his Latino culture, and he often creates pieces symbolic of his heritage. Many of these adorn his home.

After carving his elaborate creations, José sands them down with a grinder and adds paint or stain, always careful that the beautiful grains in the wood are visible. For José , this pastime provides focus and a way to escape from the stresses of life.

“The tools I use drown out the sounds of what is going on all around me so I can focus on what I am doing.  I also enjoy seeing these pieces begin to take shape,” José said.

While José generally creates these pieces for his family’s enjoyment, some have been seen in the corridors of the Frederic and Mary Wolfe Center and have been featured at art exhibits and even The Toledo art Museum of Art.