UT School of Visual & Performing Arts

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The Arts Commission Highlights the UT Department of Art

From the desk of the Arts Commission Director, Marc Folk:

April 2018 Newsletter

Community Collaborations


High school artist Lynwood Fisher (Rogers High School) with University of Toledo Professor of Art Thomas Lingeman. Lynwood
was recognized with the University of Toledo Department of Art Award during the 35th annual Ninth Congressional District
Invitational Art Exhibition. Photo credit: Tom Whalen

The Arts Commission values our continued and deepening partnership with the University of Toledo. We have collaborated with our UT neighbors on youth education programming, Art in Public Places conservation projects with Professor of Art Thomas Lingeman, Student Art League involvement in Momentum led by Associate Professor of Art Arturo Rodriguez, and many more examples. Our board of trustees also benefits from the inclusion of UT Department of Art Assistant Professor Dan Hernandez, currently serving as co-chair of the Art in Public Places committee.

Beginning in 2010, the Art Department has generously hosted the worksite of our Young Artists At Work (YAAW) program in their state of the art studio facilities. The YAAW apprentices benefit from their exposure to university studios, expert faculty and positive interactions with undergraduate art students. Access to digital technologies, printmaking presses and a professional gallery space provide opportunities for the YAAW apprentices to explore new visual art media and gain marketable job skills during their six-week summer employment with The Arts Commission.

Since 2007, The University of Toledo has annually sponsored monetary awards for The Ninth Congressional District Invitational Art Exhibition. Presented by Congresswoman Kaptur and The Arts Commission, this program invites high school artists who live in the Ninth Congressional District to showcase their talent in the form of two-dimensional visual artwork. Starting in 2016, The University of Toledo deepened their involvement with the program by integrating the exhibition design and installation of the Toledo portion of the Congressional exhibition into their Gallery Practice course curriculum.

The Arts Commission’s staff are thankful to work alongside many talented University of Toledo student interns. We applaud the university faculty for the contributions they have made in the lives of their students as they consider careers in the arts and culture sector.

We thank the University of Toledo Art Department for their many contributions to our community, continued partnership in supporting talented youth artists, and leadership in advocating for arts, culture and education.


Roger Ray Humanities Institute – “I Got a Lust for Life”

A one-day public program that began in Detroit and finished in Toledo explored the impact of the African-American Great Migration on literary and musical expression in northwest Ohio and southeast Michigan.

The program, “I Got a Lust for Life: The Unique Words and Sounds of Northwest Ohio and Southeast Michigan,” included panel discussions, poetry readings and musical performances on Saturday, Jan. 20, in Detroit at Wayne State University and in Toledo at the Toledo Lucas County Public Library and Toledo Museum of Art.

The program began in Detroit with panel discussion at Wayne State University’s Schaver Music Recital Hall. The panel included Ben Blackwell, co-founder of Third Man Records and official archivist for the White Stripes; John Gibbs Rockwood, Toledo author of the 2014 book “Can I Get a Witness” that features his photographs of iconic rock, pop, blues and folk musicians performing in the region during the early 1970s through the 2000s; Ramona Collins, Toledo-based popular jazz singer; and Oliver Ragsdale Jr., president of the Carr Center, a community hub for African-American artistic expression in Detroit.

Roger Ray Humanities I Got a Lust for Life
Detroit morning event (Schaver Music Recital Hall, Old Main, Wayne State University)

“I Got a Lust for Life” then moved to Toledo, where Tyehimba Jess performed a poetry reading and held a book signing at the McMaster Center of the Toledo Lucas County Public Library. Jess is a 2017 Pulitzer Prize-winning poet from Detroit whose work has focused on music, biography and African-American history. He read read from “Olio,” his award-winning collection of poetry that weaves together sonnet, song and narrative to examine the lives of mostly unrecorded, African-American performers from the Civil War to World War I.


McMaster Center, Main Library, Toledo Lucas County Public Library
McMaster Center, Main Library, Toledo Lucas County Public Library

The program  concluded with a panel discussion in the Glass Pavilion of the Toledo Museum of Art with Jess; M.L. Liebler, a Detroit-based, award-winning poet and editor of the anthology “Heaven Was Detroit: From Jazz to Hip-Hop and Beyond”; Frances Brockington, associate professor of voice at Wayne State University; and Dr. Lee Ellen Martin, jazz vocalist and Jon Hendricks scholar.  Mack and Duchan moderated the discussion, which was followed by a musical performance  by UT Jazz students an alumni.

Audience inthe TMA Glass Pavilion
“I
Got a Lust for Life” in the TMA Glass Pavilion.

“I Got a Lust for Life: The Unique Words and Sounds of Northwest Ohio and Southeast Michigan” was sponsored by the Roger Ray Institute for the Humanities at The University of Toledo, which advocates for and supports the study of human culture — from a great variety of fields — at all levels of learning and scholarship. Additional support for the program was provided by UT, WSU, the Toledo Lucas County Public Library, Toledo.com and the Toledo Museum of Art.


Review of the “Heterogeneous: States of American,” exhibition curated by Brian Carpenter

A recent review from the  exhibition,

“Heterogeneous: States of American,” Josh Byers, David Cuatlacuatl, and Faith Goodman @ River House Arts

 curated by Brian Carpenter and the Contemporary Art Toledo exhibition that is currently up at River House Arts (featuring UT Art Department alumna Faith Goodman).

https://loranitude.wordpress.com/tag/toledo-contemporary-art/


“Piece it Together” exhibition review article published in natbrut

Just wanted to share the release of the Nat.Brut article featuring Beryl Satter’s essay and art work from the CVA’s gallery exhibition Piece it Together.

http://www.natbrut.com


Fred Wilson Field Trip

© Mysoon Rizk, PhD / November 2016

On November 3, 2016, a colleague and I drove six students for an hour and a half to Oberlin, Ohio, to hear African-American artist Fred Wilson (b.1954) speak about his work on the occasion of two exhibitions he installed this past year at Oberlin College’s Allen Memorial Art Museum in this small college town (my alma mater). We were already familiar with the artist, each one of us having often admired his black glass sculpture Iago’s Mirror (2009), acquired by the Toledo Museum of Art (TMA) in 2010 — and currently on view in the TMA’s Gallery 6 for the temporary exhibition Shakespeare’s Characters: Playing the Part. Listening to a talk by the 1999 recipient of a John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation’s “genius” grant was inspiring and exciting. Getting to see his work in both a solo exhibition (Fred Wilson: Black to the Powers of Ten) and in the site-specific installation Wildfire Test Pit was amazing.

As a generous, instructive, insightful orator, Fred Wilson was spectacular, sharing slides as he described an artistic trajectory and longtime interest in understanding museums through their collections (“what’s there, what’s not there”). Starting out by invitation from the Maryland Historical Society, his attention began training on the Atlantic slave trade, the Indian slave trade, and movements of oil — or as he came to call such dynamics, Movement of Blackness. Giving form to institutional memory by “mining” museum collections, Wilson would feature decommissioned possessions, like slave shackles or a public whipping post, side by side with an institution’s finest silver and furniture. He spoke about installing over 50 portraits of Daniel Webster at the Hood Museum, in Dartmouth College, at the same time as a series of plaster cast busts identifying human specimens from around the world. In the case of the latter, Wilson hid racial inscriptions with sashes of mourning, to encourage viewers to see them as people, including a cast of Ota Benga, the Congolese youth exhibited at the World’s Fair in St. Louis, Missouri, in 1904 who would end up committing suicide in Virginia 12 years later.

In mining the Allen Memorial Art Museum at Oberlin, Mr. Wilson found himself magnetized by Edmonia Lewis whose story “remains obscured by rumor and mystery” as one scholar puts it. An orphan of African-American and Native-American heritage from New York, Lewis began to study art at Oberlin College in 1859. A few months after the Civil War had begun, she was accused of poisoning two (white) friends, beaten by a mob, arrested, and tried. Although acquitted, she remained a target and eventually left without graduating. Heading to Boston, she secured further artistic training, before taking up residency in Rome, Italy for a few years, where Lewis enjoyed success for her marble statuary. After returning to the States she disappears from the historical record. Wilson called the nineteenth-century sculptor a “guiding light” for his site-specific installation at the Oberlin museum, which he entitled Wildfire Test Pit for the Indian name given to Edmonia Lewis and the “archaeological term for a site you dig to see what’s there.”

Our field trip to Oberlin proved intensely rewarding, inspiring reflection long afterward: on the creative process, erasure and exclusion, the construct of race as well as concepts of time or memory, the roles of museums in compressing histories, individuals recorded and those forgotten, objects acknowledged and those to be buried. In the coming weeks, students will be sharing their own thoughts about the opportunity to hear from a practicing contemporary artist and to experience the work firsthand. Please stay tuned! Fred Wilson’s work remains on view at the Allen Memorial Art Museum until June 2017.


Two Great Ways to Ring in the Holiday

holiday jazzThe UT Department of Music warmly invites you and your family to join us for one or both of two amazing holiday concert events!

Thursday, December 10 at 7 p.m., the UT Jazz Holiday concert—an annual favorite—will feature performances from all of the UT jazz ensembles, as well as special guests. The program includes a large selection of the best holiday jazz tunes. Come a little early to the concert to take photos with Santa and Mrs. Claus! Bring your cameras.

Then Sunday, December 13 at 3 p.m., the College of Communication and the Arts celebrates the season in style with its Holiday Showcase, a concert combining the musical with the theatrical. The concert is about one hour and 15 minutes and is perfect for the very young and young at heart. This concert also includes an appearance by Santa for photos with you and yours.

The students of the Art Department will hold a Holiday Art Sale before and after the CoCA Holiday Showcase concert. They will be selling student artwork, ornaments, pottery, jewelry and cards—perfect for holiday gift-giving. There will also be Art Department t-shirts and tote bags for sale. They will be happy to hold your purchases for you until after the concert. Proceeds from the sale benefit the students directly and will be used to cover the costs of student travel and scholarships.

Both concerts will be held in Doermann Theater in UT’s University Hall (the building with the University’s signature clock tower). Free parking is available in the lots nearest to Doermann (Area 13 and Area 1N). Plus, golf carts will be on hand to give you a lift to the door.

Tickets to either concert are $10 each and are just $5 for students, children and seniors. They can be purchased at the door or in advance through the UT Center for Performing Arts Box Office. Call 419.530.ARTS (2787) or go online to www.UToledo.Tix.com.

I hope you’ll join us this holiday season for one of these great concerts! For more concerts and events visit utoledo.edu/CoCAevents.


The University of Toledo Department of Art students to exhibit at annual ‘Tis the Secor Holiday Exhibition – December 12

More than 20 advanced students from the University of Toledo’s Concepts in Art, Studio and Theory course will exhibit their work at the annual holiday exhibition – ‘Tis the Secor, Saturday, December 12. The event features work from the community of artists who maintain studio space inside the historic Secor building as well as 30+ vendors offering handmade goods and crafts for holiday shopping at the Market Place area. Live music will fill the air as local bands perform throughout the night. Admission is free.

The students’ unique and personal practices explored current and complex issues through a diversity of works ranging from sculpture, photography, design, and ceramics. Spanning the mystical, ideological and political, the exhibition is the culmination of each student’s investigation into both the practice and theory of their chosen subject.

The Concepts in Art, Studio and Theory (C.A.S.T.) course prepares studio art majors for their Bachelor of Arts degree through an exploration of what it means to construct a creative and meaningful life as an individual focused on the arts. The course provides an experiential and creative forum that is bound by theories and practices of contemporary art, inspired by visiting artists, and embedded in the Toledo art community. It is in this context that emerging artists hone previously acquired skills and knowledge to create self-directed works of art based on concepts, research, and class critiques. These works of art are at the center of this exhibition.

’Tis the Secor Facebook page
https://www.facebook.com/events/172608433084158

Concepts in Art, Studio and Theory (C.A.S.T.) EXHIBITION
Saturday, December 12th / 5pm – 11pm [one night only]

Secor Building [6th floor of the Secor Building]
Room 650 and 645
425 Jefferson Avenue Toledo Ohio

Contact: Brian Carpenter | Brian.Carpenter@UToledo.edu


UT Billboard Exhibition Submission

4th_UT_Billboard_Exhibition_Poster_webCoCA Student,

Want to see your design or artwork up in lights? The Art Department is currently calling for entries for electronic billboard display in 2016. The billboards will be displayed in the Toledo area in January and February. All UT student majors in the College of Communication and the Arts are eligible and encouraged to submit an entry.

Deadline for submissions is November 30 by 5pm.
For more information, contact:
Barry Whittaker
419.530.8320
William.Whittaker@utoledo.edu

A flyer with all the detail is available at https://www.dropbox.com/s/f3ing3vevf1fuq7/4thUTBillboardExhibition.pdf?dl=0


Public Art in Scandinavia: Cultural Policy, Institutions, and Purpose


A lecture on the Process and Role of Public Art in Scandinavia.

Tuesday 10 November  and Thursday 12 November
3:30-4:45pm
Snyder Memorial, Room 2110

Presented by Inger Krog, Special Consultant for Visual Arts The Danish Arts Foundation, Ministry of Culture, Denmark

Topics will include:

  • Cultural policy and practice in The Danish Arts Foundation
  • How and by whom is art commissioned
  • Differences between how state institutions and private curators function in the public art sphere
  • Urban Planning and Urban Design
  • Socially Engaged Art
  • Conflict and/or Consensus – Mediating the public, artistic freedom, and institutions.

Ms. Krog appears as a guest of the Arts Diplomacy Course, Department of Art. For additional information please call The Department of Art at 419.530.8303