UT School of Visual & Performing Arts

Posts Tagged ‘Art Profile’

Art by UT students in spotlight at juried exhibition

More than 30 works of art by UT students are on display in the 2017 Juried Student Exhibition in the Center for the Visual Arts Gallery on the University’s Toledo Museum of Art Campus.

An opening reception and award ceremony will take place Thursday, March 16, from 6 to 8 p.m. in the gallery.

“Girl With Meat” by Clairissa Martin, right, and “Political Balance” by Valerie White are included in the 2017 Juried Student Exhibition.

This year’s juror is Clara DeGalan, who was born and raised in Detroit. She attended the Detroit High School for the Fine and Performing Arts, earned a bachelor of fine arts degree at the University of Michigan, and a master of fine arts degree in painting at Wayne State University. She teaches drawing and painting at Wayne State University and Madonna University, and writes art criticism for Detroit Art Review and InfiniteMile Detroit.

The awards ceremony will coincide with the Arts Commission 3rd Thursday Loop as the Center for the Visual Arts is one of the galleries on the route.

The free, public exhibition will be on display through Friday, March 24. Gallery hours are Monday through Saturday from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.

For more information on the exhibition, contact Brian Carpenter, UT gallery director and lecturer in the Art Department, at brian.carpenter@utoledo.edu.


Review of the “Heterogeneous: States of American,” exhibition curated by Brian Carpenter

A recent review from the  exhibition,

“Heterogeneous: States of American,” Josh Byers, David Cuatlacuatl, and Faith Goodman @ River House Arts

 curated by Brian Carpenter and the Contemporary Art Toledo exhibition that is currently up at River House Arts (featuring UT Art Department alumna Faith Goodman).

https://loranitude.wordpress.com/tag/toledo-contemporary-art/


“Piece it Together” exhibition review article published in natbrut

Just wanted to share the release of the Nat.Brut article featuring Beryl Satter’s essay and art work from the CVA’s gallery exhibition Piece it Together.

http://www.natbrut.com


Fred Wilson Field Trip

© Mysoon Rizk, PhD / November 2016

On November 3, 2016, a colleague and I drove six students for an hour and a half to Oberlin, Ohio, to hear African-American artist Fred Wilson (b.1954) speak about his work on the occasion of two exhibitions he installed this past year at Oberlin College’s Allen Memorial Art Museum in this small college town (my alma mater). We were already familiar with the artist, each one of us having often admired his black glass sculpture Iago’s Mirror (2009), acquired by the Toledo Museum of Art (TMA) in 2010 — and currently on view in the TMA’s Gallery 6 for the temporary exhibition Shakespeare’s Characters: Playing the Part. Listening to a talk by the 1999 recipient of a John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation’s “genius” grant was inspiring and exciting. Getting to see his work in both a solo exhibition (Fred Wilson: Black to the Powers of Ten) and in the site-specific installation Wildfire Test Pit was amazing.

As a generous, instructive, insightful orator, Fred Wilson was spectacular, sharing slides as he described an artistic trajectory and longtime interest in understanding museums through their collections (“what’s there, what’s not there”). Starting out by invitation from the Maryland Historical Society, his attention began training on the Atlantic slave trade, the Indian slave trade, and movements of oil — or as he came to call such dynamics, Movement of Blackness. Giving form to institutional memory by “mining” museum collections, Wilson would feature decommissioned possessions, like slave shackles or a public whipping post, side by side with an institution’s finest silver and furniture. He spoke about installing over 50 portraits of Daniel Webster at the Hood Museum, in Dartmouth College, at the same time as a series of plaster cast busts identifying human specimens from around the world. In the case of the latter, Wilson hid racial inscriptions with sashes of mourning, to encourage viewers to see them as people, including a cast of Ota Benga, the Congolese youth exhibited at the World’s Fair in St. Louis, Missouri, in 1904 who would end up committing suicide in Virginia 12 years later.

In mining the Allen Memorial Art Museum at Oberlin, Mr. Wilson found himself magnetized by Edmonia Lewis whose story “remains obscured by rumor and mystery” as one scholar puts it. An orphan of African-American and Native-American heritage from New York, Lewis began to study art at Oberlin College in 1859. A few months after the Civil War had begun, she was accused of poisoning two (white) friends, beaten by a mob, arrested, and tried. Although acquitted, she remained a target and eventually left without graduating. Heading to Boston, she secured further artistic training, before taking up residency in Rome, Italy for a few years, where Lewis enjoyed success for her marble statuary. After returning to the States she disappears from the historical record. Wilson called the nineteenth-century sculptor a “guiding light” for his site-specific installation at the Oberlin museum, which he entitled Wildfire Test Pit for the Indian name given to Edmonia Lewis and the “archaeological term for a site you dig to see what’s there.”

Our field trip to Oberlin proved intensely rewarding, inspiring reflection long afterward: on the creative process, erasure and exclusion, the construct of race as well as concepts of time or memory, the roles of museums in compressing histories, individuals recorded and those forgotten, objects acknowledged and those to be buried. In the coming weeks, students will be sharing their own thoughts about the opportunity to hear from a practicing contemporary artist and to experience the work firsthand. Please stay tuned! Fred Wilson’s work remains on view at the Allen Memorial Art Museum until June 2017.


UT STUDENT ARTWORK ON LOCAL DIGITAL BILLBOARDS

The University of Toledo student artwork to appear on area digital billboards January – February, 2016

 

In collaboration with Lamar Outdoor Advertising, University of Toledo Department of Art students have been invited to display their work on digital billboards throughout the Toledo area. Many students submitted entries. The works chosen will be on display until the end of February 2016.

Assistant professor of art, Barry Whittaker, who coordinated the project, says this is the fourth year UT art students have been invited to have their work displayed. To see the images in this year’s exhibition, visit the online photos album “UT Art Student Billboards 2016” on Facebook.

Student artists participating in this year’s exhibition:

Nikka Geiermann

Katelyn Greenhill

Crystal Hand

Isabel Isaza

Kayla Kirk

Mike Miller

Joseph Okoyomo

Emily Rose

Abbey Ruppel

Brandy Save

Chelsea Thompson

Michelle Trivisonno

Mark Yappueying

Visit the UT Department of Art at http://www.utoledo.edu/comm-arts/art/index.html

The billboards can be found at: Reynolds Road/Corner of Glendale, The Anthony Wayne Trail at City Park, The corner of Alexis and Lewis, Monroe Street/Corner of Laskey, Byrne Road/Airport Highway, Monroe Street/West corner of Douglas, and Erie at Monroe

Mike Miller- UT student art

Source: UT Department of Art – Facebook


Art Alumnus ERIC THAYER to Show at ImageOHIO 2016

Eric Thayer, who graduated from The University of Toledo in 2008 (Art History & BFA), has been selected to show in ImageOHIO 2016, an exhibition featuring photography, video, and digital media from artists living in or with roots in Ohio. Click the link to visit the show’s web site http://www.roygbivgallery.com/exhibitions/imageohio-16/

Eric Thayer’s blog www.thegreatchainsawjugglingact.blogspot.com

Eric Thayer is on Vimeo!


Art Students to Present on Contemporary Artists

Yayoi Kusama in Yellow Tree furniture room at Aich triennale, Nagoya, Japan, 2010 (detail). © Yayoi Kusama. Image courtesy Yayoi Kusma Studio Inc.; Ota Fine Arts, Tokyo; Victoria Miro Gallery, London; and Gagosian Gallery New York

Yayoi Kusama in Yellow Tree furniture room at Aich triennale, Nagoya, Japan, 2010 (detail). © Yayoi Kusama. Image courtesy Yayoi Kusma Studio Inc.; Ota Fine Arts, Tokyo; Victoria Miro Gallery, London; and Gagosian Gallery New York

Students in the University of Toledo Department of Art Contemporary Art course will present on a number of contemporary artists over the next few weeks. Artists to be featured, diverse internationally and artistically, include such artists as Yayoi Kusama (left), a Japanese artist and writer. A precursor of the pop art, minimalist and feminist art movements, Kusama influenced contemporaries such as Andy Warhol and Claes Oldenburg.

A complete list of artists and dates is below. Click the artist’s name to learn more about the artist and their work. All of the presentations are free and open to the public. All are welcome to come and learn more about these amazing artists.
PRESENTATION SCHEDULE
Thursday, December 3 from 12:10-1:25 p.m.)

Tuesday, December 8 from 12:10-1:25 p.m.)

Thursday, December 10 from 12:10-1:25 p.m.)

Tuesday, December 15 from 12:30-2:30


Art Faculty Gets International Press

SeptemberVisionCoverUT Art Department faculty member, William Whittaker, had his artwork published in the September 2015 edition of Vision Magazine. Vision Magazine is a leading art and fashion magazine showcasing the international visual art, fashion and culture to Chinese readers, with its unique visual expression. His published work was from an exhibition project called # TAGGING ART#. This is an art game of crossovers and cross-space. The participating artists from around the world contributed two projects that best presented their work. The curator assigned the works to be anonymously given to other participants, who made new artworks in response to the assigned projects.
See excerpts from the September issue on Barry’s Bloghttp://barrywhittaker.com/blog/
Visit Vision Magazine online http://www.youthvision.cn/index.asp?C=Art


Public Art in Scandinavia: Cultural Policy, Institutions, and Purpose


A lecture on the Process and Role of Public Art in Scandinavia.

Tuesday 10 November  and Thursday 12 November
3:30-4:45pm
Snyder Memorial, Room 2110

Presented by Inger Krog, Special Consultant for Visual Arts The Danish Arts Foundation, Ministry of Culture, Denmark

Topics will include:

  • Cultural policy and practice in The Danish Arts Foundation
  • How and by whom is art commissioned
  • Differences between how state institutions and private curators function in the public art sphere
  • Urban Planning and Urban Design
  • Socially Engaged Art
  • Conflict and/or Consensus – Mediating the public, artistic freedom, and institutions.

Ms. Krog appears as a guest of the Arts Diplomacy Course, Department of Art. For additional information please call The Department of Art at 419.530.8303


 


Art Faculty Member to Exhibit at The Secor

Dan Hernandez at his exhibit in Madhouse Gallery

Dan Hernandez at his exhibit in Madhouse Gallery

The University of Toledo Department of Art is pleased to announce the upcoming exhibition of one of its faculty. DAN HERNANDEZ: Recent Work will be on view from September 3 to October 1 at the Secor Gallery (425 Jefferson Ave, Toledo) and will include a selection of new and recent artwork from Hernandez’s “Genesis” body of work. Much of the work on view at this exhibition was produced this summer with the support of a University URAF research grant and an Ohio Arts Council Individual Excellence Award. The work in this exhibition will also travel to New York City in November for a solo exhibition at Kim Foster Gallery, where Dan is professionally represented.

Nocturne by artist Dan Hernandez

Nocturne by artist Dan Hernandez

Dan Hernandez is an assistant professor of art at the University of Toledo. His work has recently been presented in solo exhibitions at the University of Kentucky and the University of Michigan. It has also been included in group-shows in Tel-Aviv (Israel), London (UK), Brooklyn, New York, Miami, Los Angeles, Las Vegas and numerous other cities. Hernandez’s work has been written about and reproduced in publications in France, Germany, Israel, England and the United States including a review of his 2014 exhibition at Kim Foster in ARTnews.

An opening reception for this exhibition will be held on September 3 from 6-8pm. The artist will also be in the gallery for a Meet and Greet during the “Third Thursday Art Walk” on September 17. Both events are free and open to the public. The Secor Gallery is open Tuesday through Saturday, 5 p.m. to 11 p.m. or by appointment.

Contact:
Dan Hernandez
daniel.hernandez@utoledo.edu
Office: 419-530-8321