UT School of Visual & Performing Arts

Posts Tagged ‘Theatre and Film’

The Arts Mean Business – Lots of Business – in Ohio!

A graphic describing how the Arts in Ohio have contributed more than $41 billion dollars to the economy in 2018 Ohio Citizens for the Arts Foundation has released the results of a study developed in conjunction with the Center for Regional Development and Bowling Green State University that shows the true power and impact of Ohio’s creative industries. The report proves that Ohio’s creative industries are much more than regional amenities. In short, they are powerful economic engines. Key findings from the report show that the arts in Ohio have experienced significant growth in the past few years and now account for more than $41 billion in economic activity while supporting nearly 290,000 jobs annually. Additionally, the arts and creative industries generate over $4.5 billion in federal, state, and local tax revenue annually.

 

Some TOLEDO highlights of the report:

  • The creative economy generates $831 million in the Toledo MSA,
  • It supports 12,065 jobs and supplies more than $466 million in wages and proprietor income,
  • Advertising and public relations lead the creative industries. The sector is responsible for $183 million dollars and supports 944 jobs in the Toledo MSA,
  • Museums, historical sites, zoos, and parks – direct impact = $79,210,422
  • Ornamental and architectural metal work manufacturing- direct impact = $39,911,247
  • Performing arts companies- direct impact = $35,285,152
  • Independent artists, writers, and performers- direct impact = $27,508,446

To download the full report and to see more on the impact of the arts in Toledo, visit
https://www.artsimpactohio.org/toledo/


Classic Films on Film – What a Concept!

Scene from "The Lady Vanishes" directed by Alfred Hitchcock

Scene from “The Lady Vanishes” directed by Alfred Hitchcock

The University of Toledo Department of Theatre & Film will present a series of classic movies projected from 16mm film. Commercial films across the U.S. and shown locally are digitally projected in today’s world. These classic films will be shown as they were intended—on actual film. Please join us. The films will be shown at 7:30 p.m. in the UT Center for Performing Arts, Room 1039.

Below is a list of the films in the series.

Fall 2015
1. Friday September 4th
The Lady Vanishes directed by Alfred Hitchcock, 1938, 96 minutes, starring Margaret Lockwood and Michael Redgrave

2. Friday October 2nd
Seven Samurai directed by Akira Kurosawa, 1954, 207 minutes, starring Toshiro Mifune, Takashi Shimura, Keiko Tsushima

3. Friday November 6th
His Girl Friday directed by Howard Hawks, 1940, 92 minutes, starring Cary Grant and Rosalind Russell

Spring 2016
4. Friday February 5th
Breathless directed by Jean Luc Goddard, 1961, 90 minutes, starring Jean-Paul Beimondo, Jean Seberg, Daniel Boulanger

5. Saturday, March 19
Student Filmmaker’s Showcase
The best of student films chosen in juried competition

6. Friday April 1st
Stagecoach directed by John Ford, 1939, 96 minutes, starring John Wayne, Claire Trevor, Andy Devine

Tickets are $10 general admission and $5 for students, faculty, staff, alumni, seniors and members of the U.S. military. Tickets include complimentary soft drink and popcorn. Advance tickets are available through the UT Center for Performing Arts Box Office (M-F 12-5 p.m.) and one hour prior to show time. The Center for Performing Arts is located on UT’s main campus at Towerview West and West Rocket Drive.


Professor’s film shown at distinguished festivals

smiling faces

A still from Holly Hey’s film “the dumdum capitol of the world”

Congratulations to Associate Professor Holly Hey, who screened her film The Dum Dum Capitol of the World at the Ann Arbor Film Festival, the Athens Film Festival, and the Queens World Film Festival.

A brief synopsis: The Dum Dum Capitol of the World (Holly Hey, 2014) 21 minutes.
An experimental documentary that contemplates landscape, home, memory, queerness, and time. The project illuminates social constructs about sexuality, self, and human instinct. Visible and latent hostilities directed towards queerness surface.