UT School of Visual & Performing Arts

Posts Tagged ‘Theatre Film Faculty’

UT film professor’s documentary on the Flint water crisis receives PBS distribution

Toledo, OH, July 18th, 2018 – The National Educational Telecommunications Association (“NETA”) has contracted with Professor Holly Hey, Head of the Film/Video program at the University of Toledo for exclusive public television distribution rights of Hey’s film “Crossing Water – Flint Michigan – 2017,” a documentary about the ongoing water crisis in Flint, MI. Hey worked with the non-profit service organization Crossing Water to highlight the continuing needs and challenges facing the residents of Flint and the social service volunteers who help them. The film will broadcast regionally for the first time on WNED Buffalo, NY on Saturday August 11 at 5 p.m. Katherine Larsen senior director of Radio/TV programming for WNED says Hey’s film is a, “great program on an ongoing issue. Clean water is vital to our communities, especially in the Great Lakes region.”

Photo of Holly Hey, Professor of Film at the University of Toledo

Holly Hey, Professor of Film – The University of Toledo

Flint, Michigan made national news in 2014 when the city’s emergency manager switched the source of the city’s water, plaguing residents with a host of immediate and toxic problems, including: deadly bacteria, outbreaks and deaths from Legionnaires’ disease, and the wide-spread presence of lead in the city’s drinking water. In the film, Hey highlights the work of Crossing Water, a nonprofit organization that brings together social workers and other volunteers to bring water, services, and access to resources to the hardest hit residents of Flint. Hey weaves together multiple stories of Crossing Water volunteers, staff, and Flint residents, creating a portrait of what it is like to live within an ongoing systemic disaster. Crossing Water Executive Director Michael Hood called the film “a sobering story of the Flint water crisis.” Hey believes that all Americans should care about Flint because it’s a crisis that is indicative of the future for many US communities. According to CNN, over 5,300 municipalities around the country are in violation of lead rules. Hey says, “eventually systems will fail in any community, systems essential to human life like water and power. We can’t ignore that we are all vulnerable to such collapse, wherever we live in America.”

ABOUT THE MOVIE


Faculty Film Accepted to British Short Film Festival

Holly Hey, Associate Professor of Film, The University of Toledo

Holly Hey, Associate Professor of Film, The University of Toledo

Holly Hey, a filmmaker and faculty member of The University of Toledo Department of Theatre & Film, will screen one of her films in the internationally recognized Aesthetica Short Film Festival in November. The Aesthetica Film Festival, accredited by the British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA), is a celebration of independent film, and an outlet for championing and supporting short filmmaking. The festival includes a rich selection of films from across the world, in genres including advertising, artists’ film, music video, drama and documentary. Her film emerged successfully after two highly competitive rounds of selection review.
Ms. Hey says that “the dum dum capitol of the world” is a first person experimental documentary and a moving image meditation that contemplates landscape, home, recollection, queerness, and time.

From Holly Hey's short film "dum dum capitol of the world"

From Holly Hey’s short film “dum dum capitol of the world”

The project uses personal history to reflect on universal themes about home, life, love, parenting, memory, and death. Professor Hey began the project in 2005 when she received major funding from LEF Moving Image Foundation. She later received major funding from the University of Toledo in 2012 and completed the film in 2014.

To date, “the dum dum capitol of the world” has also screened in several U.S. festivals including The Ann Arbor Film Festival (the largest and longest running annual celebration of independent and experimental film and video in North America), the Athens Film Festival in Athens, Ohio, The Queens World Film Festival in New York, as well as The Moon Rise Film Festival in British Columbia.

Ms. Hey is currently an Associate Professor and Head of the Film Program within the Department of Theatre and Film. She holds a MFA in filmmaking from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She makes a broad range of work that can be seen in galleries, film festivals, live performances, and on television. Her works have screened both nationally and internationally, and The National Educational Telecommunications Association (N.E.T.A.) distributes her last major release “Rat Stories” that has been aired on PBS affiliates within the United States, British Columbia, and Puerto Rico.

The Aesthetica Short Film Festival – 2015 http://www.asff.co.uk/


Midsummer Borrowings Festival

Midsummer Borrowings events on campus

The College of Communication and the Arts (CoCA) celebrated its annual Arts and Humanities Festival with a series of events in collaboration with the Toledo Symphony Orchestra (TSO) and its production of “Midsummer Night Mysteries,” March 27-28. UT students and faculty took part in the Symphony production at the Peristyle. Leading up to the performances, CoCA presented related lectures, a concert and a film screening on campus.

Friday film screening
On Friday, March 20 in the Haigh Auditorium of the Center for Visual Arts, a screening of the 1935 Max Reinhardt film A Midsummer Night’s Dream was introduced by Dr. Matt Yockey, Assistant Professor of Film in the UT Department of Theatre & Film.

Nominated for Best Picture, this film adaptation of Reinhardt’s successful Hollywood Bowl production of the Shakespeare play includes extensive use of Felix Mendelssohn’s music as re-orchestrated by Erich Wolfgang Korngold and ballet sequences choreographed by Bronislava Nijinska. The cast includes Mickey Rooney, Olivia DeHavilland and James Cagney, among many other familiar names and faces.

Sunday Great Gallery concert by Bezonian Trio
On Sunday, March 22, the Bezonian Trio featuring Antonina Chekhovskaya, soprano, performed in the Toledo Museum of Art’s Great Gallery. The concert featured pieces that recall two of Shakespeare’s most famous plays – Macbeth (Beethoven’s Piano Trio in D major, Op.70 #1 “Ghost”) and Hamlet (Ophelia’s Song by Dimitri Shostakovich). The Bezonian Trio is comprised of Merwin Siu (violin) and Damon Coleman (cello) of the Toledo Symphony, and Dr. Michael Boyd (piano), professor of piano at The University of Toledo.

Mendelssohn’s Music, Reinhardt’s Diaphanous Damsels, Shakespeare’s Fairies
On Wednesday March 25, Matthew Wikander, Distinguished University Professor Emeritus of the UT Department of English, presented a lecture about fairies in A Midsummer Night’s Dream.

“We are spirits of another sort,” the fairy king Oberon reminds Puck as Shakespeare’s Midsummer Night’s Dreamers awaken into morning. Puck has just been describing the dawn as a time when “damned spirits” return to their “wormy beds”—a kind of reverse zombie apocalypse. Oberon’s and Puck’s disagreements do not begin or end here, but this interchange raises the question of what kind of fairies the fairies in Shakespeare’s plays are, and, by extension, the further question of how to represent them. This talk focused on the problem of representing fairies musically, in Mendelssohn’s incidental score, cinematically, in Max Reinhardt’s film version of his famous stage production, and poetically, as the fairies appear in Shakespeare’s text.


CoCA Collaboration with the Toledo Symphony

The College of Communication and the Arts (CoCA) celebrated its annual Arts & Humanities Festival with a series of events in collaboration with the Toledo Symphony Orchestra (TSO) and its production of “Midsummer Night Mysteries,” March 27-28. UT students and faculty took part in the Symphony production at the Peristyle. Leading up to the performances, CoCA presented related lectures, a concert and a film screening on campus. More on those in another post.

Midsummer Night Mysteries with TSO

Mendelssohn’s ethereal Overture, effervescent Scherzo, and iconic Wedding March highlight the first half of “Midsummer Night Mysteries.” The North American premiere of Volker David Kirchner’s Labyrinthos presented the Bard’s fairies, lovers and comic sidekicks, alongside music inspired by the Italian Baroque master Claudio Monteverdi. Stephan Sanderling conducted and Cornel Gabara, associate professor of Theatre and Head of Acting at UT, directed and portrayed the dual character Egeus/Bottom.

A number of UT students and faculty participated in the performance. UT faculty who acted in the show included Irene Alby, Lecturer in the Department of Theatre and Film, who played Hippolyta/Titania and as mentioned above, Gabara played Egeus/Bottom.

UT Theatre students involved in the production included Ian Davis as Demetrius; Jeffrey Burden as Oberon/Theseus; Nolan Thomaswick as Lysander; Victoria Zajac as Hermia; Keely-Rain Battle as Puck; and Elif Ertürk as Helena. Students also doubled up and played other roles, such as the mechanicals and fairies.

Set design was done by Gabara; costume design was done by Daniel Thobias, Assistant Professor of Theatre and Head of Design in the Department of Theatre and Film; and lighting was handled by James S. Hill, retired chair of UT Department of Theatre & Film.


Professor’s film shown at distinguished festivals

smiling faces

A still from Holly Hey’s film “the dumdum capitol of the world”

Congratulations to Associate Professor Holly Hey, who screened her film The Dum Dum Capitol of the World at the Ann Arbor Film Festival, the Athens Film Festival, and the Queens World Film Festival.

A brief synopsis: The Dum Dum Capitol of the World (Holly Hey, 2014) 21 minutes.
An experimental documentary that contemplates landscape, home, memory, queerness, and time. The project illuminates social constructs about sexuality, self, and human instinct. Visible and latent hostilities directed towards queerness surface.


UT Collaborates with Toledo Symphony to Celebrate Mozart

Celebrating the Genius of Mozart - January through February 2014

Celebrating the Genius of Mozart – January through February 2014

 

The University of Toledo College of Communication and the Arts is collaborating with the Toledo Symphony on a number of events connected with celebrating Mozart, January through February.

For two years, The University of Toledo and the TSO have been proud to collaborate on an arts and humanities festival. Centered on themes inspired by Symphony programs, these lectures, movie screenings and performances have covered diverse topics from the pain of the Civil War to modern day film culture.

This year’s festival celebrates the genius of Mozart, the fascinating time period of the 18th century and the ways it continues to intrigue us today. The series culminates on February 7 & 8 when the Symphony performs the original Peter Shaffer play, “Amadeus,” accompanied by music from the film—all performed live.

Cornel Gabara Associate Professor of Theatre, Head of Acting at The University of Toledo

Cornel Gabara
Associate Professor of Theatre, Head of Acting at The University of Toledo

Cornel Gabara, associate professor of theatre and head of acting at UT, will direct the theatrical production. Gabara has also directed two previous productions with the TSO, including “Every Good Boy Deserves Favour,” which was taken to Carnegie Hall.The following week, the UT Symphony Orchestra and Choirs perform an All Mozart Concert in the University’s newly-renovated Doermann Theatre.

Most events are free.

FREE LECTURES
Light refreshments will be provided at all Libbey Hall lectures, and we encourage a robust Q&A following each talk.

“Mozart’s Mysterious Demise: Freemasonic Revenge Legends and Shaffer’s Amadeus” with Dr. Edmund Lingan, Associate Professor and Interim Chair of the UT Department of Theatre & Film
Tuesday, January 7 at 7 p.m.
Libbey Hall, UT Main Campus

“Mozart, Genius and the Popular Imagination” with UT musicologist Ashley Mirakian
Tuesday, January 14 at 7 p.m.
Libbey Hall, UT Main Campus

“Under Mozart’s Petticoat: Period Costuming”
With UT’s Erica Frank, Theatre Lecturer and Costume Designer, and Daniel Thobias, Assistant Professor of Theatre & Costume Design
Tuesday, January 21 at 7 p.m.
Libbey Hall, UT Main Campus

“Mozart from a Performer’s Perspective” with conductor Robert Mirakian and violinist, Merwin Siu
Tuesday, January 28 at 7 p.m.
Libbey Hall, UT Main Campus

CONCERTS

AMADEUS: IN CONCERT
Toledo Symphony Classics Series
Friday and Saturday, February 7 & 8
8 p.m.| Peristyle at the Toledo Museum of Art
$22-$55 | The Toledo Symphony performs music from the film, while actors perform the original Peter Shaffer play—a dazzling, multi-sensory experience! Selections from Mozart’s “Requiem,” operas, piano concertos and much more.
For tickets call 419.246.8000 or visit www.ToledoSymphony.com

ALL MOZART CONCERT
UT Symphony Orchestra and Choirs
Saturday, February 15
3 p.m. | Doermann Theatre, UT Main Campus
FREE
Read More About It…

http://www.toledoblade.com/Music-Theater-Dance/2014/01/02/Symphony-UT-collaborate-to-celebrate-Mozart.html

http://www.toledosymphony.com/news/2014/01/03/main/symphony-ut-collaborate-to-celebrate-mozart/

http://www.toledosymphony.com/events/amadeus/

 


UT Lighting Faculty wins 2013 Jefferson Award

TJ Gerckens, Lighting Lecturer, University of Toledo Department of Theatre & Film

TJ Gerckens, Lighting Lecturer, University of Toledo Department of Theatre & Film

 

Congratulations to UT Department of Theatre & Film Lecturer, Professor TJ Gerckens, for receiving the prestigious 2013 Jefferson Award for “Outstanding Lighting Design-Large Theatre” for his design for Mary Zimmerman’s “Metamorphoses” at the Lookingglass in Chicago last fall. Gerckens also designed the lighting for the original 2001 off-Broadway production of “Metamorphoses.” Interim Chair of the UT Department of Theatre & Film, Dr. Edmund Lingan adds, “TJ’s accomplishment raises the prestige and visibility of the department, the College of Communication and the Arts, and the University of Toledo.”

The Joseph Jefferson Awards, a.k.a The Jeff’ Awards, “fosters the artistic growth of area theatres and theatre artists and promotes educational opportunities, audience appreciation, and civic pride in the achievements of the theatre community. The Jeff Awards evaluates over 250 theatrical productions and holds two awards ceremonies annually.

T.J. Gerckens, who joined the UT Department of Theatre and Film faculty September 2012, is a professional lighting designer and member of United Scenic Artist, the union of professional designers in the entertainment field.  He has worked professionally in dance, opera, and theatre lighting for over 17 years.  He is best known for his collaborations with international playwright/director, Mary Zimmerman, in over 14 professional production that extend from Broadway, Off-Broadway, Metropolitan Opera, Chicago Opera Theatre, Actors Theatre of Louisville, Berkeley Repertory Theatre, Arena Stage, Washington, D.C., Goodman  and Court Theatres in Chicago.

Lawrence E. DiStasi and  Anjali Bhimani in Lookingglass Theatre Company's production  of  "Metamorphoses."

Lawrence E. DiStasi and Anjali Bhimani in Lookingglass Theatre Company’s production of “Metamorphoses.”
The Theater Loop with Chris Jones, Chicago Tribune

 

About the Jeff Awards | http://www.jeffawards.org/home/index.cfm  


Recent Posts

Recent Comments

Archives

Categories

Meta