Global & Disaster Medicine

World Fistula Day

Kenya Star

“…..The three-day conference, under the theme of “Ending Obstetric Fistula in a Generation” is part of the commemorations to mark the World Fistula Day, observed today.

Other related activities include an ongoing Fistula screening and medical intervention of the condition at Gatundu Level 5 hospital.

Obstetric Fistula is a devastating and demeaning condition caused by prolonged obstructed labour, leaving a woman with insufficient voluntary control over urination. It also causes suffering, indignity and disability. The condition is preventable and treatable.

Strong smells occasioned by this condition forces many affected women to remain in hiding away from any public interactions including being shunned by insensitive family members. Separation and divorce are some of the other consequences of the condition.

Globally, an estimated 2 million mothers suffer the stigma of Obstetric Fistula while giving birth……”

 


Two suspected suicide bombers killed three Indonesian police officers and injured 10 people on Wednesday night in twin blasts near a bus station Jakarta’s Kampung Melayu terminal

Reuters

 

 


The Office of Health Affairs (OHA): The Department of Homeland Security’s principal authority for all medical and health issues.

Office of Health Affairs

OHA anticipates the public health impact of biological attacks, chemical releases, pandemics and infectious disease threats, and disasters to help prepare the nation to respond and rebound. Our expertise supports DHS operations, its workforce, and the preparedness of public health and medical communities.

OHA advises DHS leadership about health security issues, guides DHS policies to keep its workforce safe, and coordinates stakeholders at all levels of government to prepare for, respond to, and recover from the public health consequences of national threats and hazards.

OHA helps inform federal, state, and local decision-making about high consequence biological threats with biosurveillance programs that give early warnings for a rapid response to contain and limit the impact.

OHA helps communities nationwide prepare for a chemical or biological attack and build their own capacity to respond and recover.

Mission

To advise, promote, integrate, and enable a safe and secure workforce and nation in pursuit of national health security.

View the Office of Health Affairs Organizational Chart

Goals

  • Provide expert health and medical advice to department leadership
  • Build national resilience against health incidents
  • Enhance national and department medical first responder capabilities
  • Protect the department workforce against health threats

Leadership and Organization

OHA is led by the Assistant Secretary and Chief Medical Officer.

Divisions

  • The Health Threats Resilience Division – helps the nation prepare for and respond to the health impacts of chemical and biological incidents and other threats and hazards.
  • The Workforce Health and Medical Support Division – leads health protection and medical oversight activities for the DHS workforce and coordinates with stakeholders nationwide to strengthen the emergency medical response system.  OHA guides DHS medical services with medical expertise, oversight, credentialing, protocols, and standards. OHA medical and veterinary experts guide the department on health threats to ensure a ready and resilient workforce. And OHA collaborates with federal, state, and local emergency medical services stakeholders to ensure we can work together in a crisis.

Publications

Contact Information

By mail or phone

Department of Homeland Security
Washington, D.C. 20528
Attn: Office of Health Affairs

Phone: 202-254-6479

By e-mail

HealthAffairs@dhs.gov

Follow on Twitter

@DHSHealth1

 


How the Paris medical community responded so quickly and effectively to the 2015 terror attacks

MedResponse-ParisTerror: Document

MedPage Today


Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus from Ethiopia will be the next director general of the World Health Organization (WHO).

BBC

WHO

World Health Assembly elects Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus as new WHO Director-General

News release

Today the Member States of WHO elected Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus as the new Director-General of WHO.

Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus was nominated by the Government of Ethiopia, and will begin his five-year term on 1 July 2017.

Prior to his election as WHO’s next Director-General, Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus served as Minister of Foreign Affairs, Ethiopia from 2012–2016 and as Minister of Health, Ethiopia from 2005–2012. He has also served as chair of the Board of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria; as chair of the Roll Back Malaria (RBM) Partnership Board; and as co-chair of the Board of the Partnership for Maternal, Newborn and Child Health.

As Minister of Health, Ethiopia, Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus led a comprehensive reform effort of the country’s health system, including the expansion of the country’s health infrastructure, creating 3500 health centres and 16 000 health posts; expanded the health workforce by 38 000 health extension workers; and initiated financing mechanisms to expand health insurance coverage. As Minister of Foreign Affairs, he led the effort to negotiate the Addis Ababa Action Agenda, in which 193 countries committed to the financing necessary to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals.

As Chair of the Global Fund and of RBM, Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus secured record funding for the two organizations and created the Global Malaria Action Plan, which expanded RBM’s reach beyond Africa to Asia and Latin America.

Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus will succeed Dr Margaret Chan, who has been WHO’s Director-General since 1 January 2007.

 BIO:

Prior to his election as WHO’s next Director-General, Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus served as Minister of Foreign Affairs, Ethiopia from 2012-2016 and as Minister of Health, Ethiopia from 2005-2012. He has also served as chair of the Board of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria; as chair of the Roll Back Malaria (RBM) Partnership Board, and as co-chair of the Board of the Partnership for Maternal, Newborn and Child Health.

As Minister of Health, Ethiopia, Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus led a comprehensive reform effort of the country’s health system, including the expansion of the country’s health infrastructure, creating 3,500 health centres and 16,000 health posts; expanded the health workforce by 38,000 health extension workers; and initiated financing mechanisms to expand health insurance coverage. As Minister of Foreign Affairs, he led the effort to negotiate the Addis Ababa Action Agenda, in which 193 countries committed to the financing necessary to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals.

As Chair of the Global Fund and of RBM, Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus secured record funding for the two organizations and created the Global Malaria Action Plan, which expanded RBM’s reach beyond Africa to Asia and Latin America.

CV


Manchester: The latest from CNN

Prime Minister Theresa May announced Tuesday that the UK has raised its threat level to “critical” — the highest level — for the first time in a decade. The level suggests intelligence services believe an attack is “imminent.”

The action comes a day after a suicide bombing killed 22 people and injured dozens at an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, England.

Police have identified 22-year old Salman Abedi as the suspected attacker. He was born and raised in the United Kingdom, the Prime Minister said.

ISIS claimed responsibility for the attack but offered no proof. A British counterterrorism official told CNN that no evidence links the suspect to an established terror group.

Grande has suspended her tour. “Broken. From the bottom of my heart, i am so so sorry. i don’t have words,” the singer tweeted.

Eight-year-old Saffie Rose Roussos and 18-year-old Georgina Callander were among the first victims identified in the attack.

Key questions for investigators, according to CNN National Security Analyst Peter Bergen: Where was the bomb constructed? What chemicals were used? And how did the perpetrator learn to build the bomb?

The blast marked the deadliest terror attack on British soil since the 2005 London bombings.


The British government has raised its terrorism threat level to critical — the highest level — meaning that another attack may be imminent

NY Times

“…It was only the third time that Britain had raised the threat level to critical….”


Manchester: 22 dead and 59 injured

NY Times

 

“…..The police say a man detonated an “improvised explosive device” and died at the scene. Investigators say they believe the man acted alone, but they are trying to determine if he was part of a wider network. There were reports the device used nuts, bolts or nails as shrapnel….”

 


Yemen: 23 425 new suspected cases of cholera and 242 related deaths

WHO

Weekly update – cholera in Yemen, 20 May 2017

20 May 2017 – The Ministry of Public Health and Population of Yemen has released updated numbers of cholera cases in the country. Since the last update on 27 April, 23 425 new suspected cases of cholera and 242 related deaths (case-fatality rate 1.1%) have been reported, mainly from Amran, Hajjah and Sana’a governorates and Sana’a city.

A cumulative total of 49 495 suspected cases of cholera, including 362 associated deaths have been reported across the country since the outbreak started in October 2016. However, between 27 April and 18 May 2017, there has been a significant upsurge in the number of suspected cholera cases. The outbreak has spread to around 210 districts in 18 governorates across the country, and the case fatality rate has exceeded 1%.

WHO has intensified the cholera response activities to mitigate the outbreak, including the establishment of 4 cholera treatment and 16 oral dehydration centres, training of health workers to manage the cases, deployment of rapid response team to manage cholera cases investigations and respond to the outbreak, enhancement of Yemen’s disease early warning surveillance systems, and provision of emergency medical supplies to treatment facilities.

The ongoing response operations are severely hampered by limited active case-finding, population movement and displacement, poor accesses to health care services, food insecurity and malnutrition.


WHO travel: Wastefully extravagant or appropriate?

WHO

WHO travel to support program work

News release

Travel is an essential aspect of WHO’s global health work – convening experts for collective decision-making on health interventions or traveling experts anywhere in the world that requires technical assistance for global health. WHO’s travel expenditure in calendar year 2015 was US$ 234 million, and in calendar year 2016 was US$ 200 million – a reduction of 14%.

Less than half of these costs are for staff travel – nearly 60% is spent on travel of external experts to support countries, and for representatives of Member States to travel to technical meetings and sessions of WHO governing bodies.

WHO staff travel covers a diverse range of activities: for example, assessing countries’ emergency preparedness, implementing vaccine campaigns, training Member States’ health care workforce, and strengthening Organizational management.

WHO has clear travel policies, recently strengthened by Director-General Margaret Chan’s request for a policy prohibiting first class travel for all of WHO, regardless of position or grade. Business class travel is permitted only for official travel over 9 hours. In addition, per diems for all WHO-funded travel conform to UN rates.

The Director-General strictly abides by WHO’s travel policies. She does not travel first class. She receives a standard per diem entitlement at UN rates. For example, on recent travel to Guinea, the Director-General’s overnight stay cost the same as all other WHO travellers – €212 – and well within UN per diem rates. On some visits, the Director-General is hosted by a Member State. In those cases; her accommodation is provided by the hosting nation at no cost to WHO. When that occurs, she receives no per diem.

WHO is always looking for ways to reduce travel costs. Overall compliance with WHO’s travel policy is high, and improving each year. As an example, to-date in 2017, only 20% of business class tickets were purchased less than 14 days before travel (emergency travel often requires booking within the 14 day rule, and can be permitted with appropriate review). This is a marked improvement on the 31% during the same period in 2016 and 39% in 2015.


Categories

Recent Posts

Archives

Admin