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New dean selected to lead UT Libraries

A librarian with more than 30 years of experience in academic libraries and museums will join The University of Toledo as the leader of University Libraries effective Aug. 1.

Beau Case comes to UT from the University of Michigan Library. During his 15 years at the University of Michigan, he served as head of the arts and humanities libraries and collections managing a $7 million budget and as field librarian for classical studies.

Beau Case

Prior to the University of Michigan, Case worked at The Ohio State University as associate professor and head of the Linguistics and West European Languages Library. He also worked in libraries at Indiana University and University of California at Los Angeles.

“I am proud to welcome Beau Case to The University of Toledo as dean of University Libraries,” Dr. Andrew Hsu, provost and executive vice president for academic affairs, said. “His experience and understanding of the University research enterprise and learning environment will advance and strengthen our commitment to integrating new and emerging technologies with traditional library resources and services.”

“This is a great time to join the UT community,” Case said. “I was so impressed by the optimism and excitement I felt on campus during my interview and subsequent campus visits. I have had the chance to meet with longtime staff and faculty and with new administrators, and I was able to see both passion for tradition as well as for realizing a great future.”

Case has master’s degrees in library science and comparative literature from Indiana University and a bachelor’s degree in English from the University of California at Los Angeles.

Case is a member of the editorial boards of Cambridge University Press; ProQuest; Collection Building; and Library Collections, Acquisitions and Technical Services.

UT University Libraries includes Carlson Library, Canaday Center for Special Collections and Mulford Health Science Library.

“Libraries are amazing at promoting and leveraging technology to enhance our collections and services,” Case said. “We have been very successful in harnessing changes in IT and publishing to create ubiquity of information access on our campuses and in our communities. We must now concentrate on transforming our work to become more relevant and impactful in research, teaching and learning. Libraries and their expert staff, services, collections and spaces not only support the university mission, but also can enhance that mission by finding new ways to connect and partner with faculty and students in the research process and learning environments.”

Case is familiar with OhioLINK institutions thanks to his time at Ohio State. He also regularly visits Ohio because this is where his wife’s family lives.

“It is a dream come true to have been selected for this position – everything aligns so nicely professionally and personally,” Case said.

Barbara Floyd, who had served as interim director, is retiring from the University after 31 years.

“We are grateful for Barbara’s three decades of dedicated service to the University and her leadership during the last two years as interim director,” Hsu said. “We wish her the best upon her well-deserved retirement.”


UT President to represent MAC on NCAA Presidential Forum

The University of Toledo President Sharon L. Gaber has been appointed to represent the Mid-American Conference on the NCAA Division I Presidential Forum.

The Presidential Forum, which consists of one president or chancellor from each of the 32 NCAA Division 1 Conferences, assists the NCAA Division I Board of Directors in accomplishing its strategic mission and helps ensure that the NCAA core value involving presidential leadership of intercollegiate athletics at the campus, conference and national level is achieved.

“I am honored to represent the Mid-American Conference as the Presidential Forum discusses and provides counsel on the issues facing the NCAA,” Gaber said. “Intercollegiate athletics play an important role in higher education and I look forward to the opportunity to support our student-athletes and provide input on best practices for our campuses.”

Gaber replaces Western Michigan University President John M. Dunn, who is retiring, as the MAC representative on the Presidential Forum.

The Mid-American Conference announced the appointments today.


UT Upward Bound receives $2 million federal grant

The U.S. Department of Education renewed funding for The University of Toledo Upward Bound program for the next five years.

The program that has been helping local high school students prepare for college and succeed for more than five decades will receive $417,693 a year through 2022 for a total of approximately $2 million.

“The University of Toledo is committed to helping low-income and first generation college students succeed,” Pamela Rogers, director of UT Upward Bound, said. “We are grateful for the opportunity to continue impacting the lives of Toledo’s students and plant seeds for higher education. After all, today’s student is tomorrow’s leader.”

The funding allows the program to serve 100 high school students a year.

Rogers says for the last 24 years, 97 percent or more of participants have graduated high school, and the majority go on to college.

UT Upward Bound offers a six-week summer program on campus where students attend academic classes. This year 68 students are enrolled, and last year 60 students participated. Students also will travel to Washington, DC, this summer to visit colleges and cultural sites.

During the school year, the Upward Bound program offers workshops on taking tests, study skills and interviewing, as well as tutoring and financial aid advice.

“We want to raise high school GPAs to levels that make college entry possible,” Rogers said. “Our goal is to help these students and their families follow their dreams.”


UT receives $420,000 grant to help students through financial emergencies

The Great Lakes Higher Education Corporation and Affiliates has awarded The University of Toledo a two-year, $420,000 grant to help low-income students who experience a financial emergency, such as an unexpected car repair or medical bill, focus on their studies and stay in college.

The Dash Emergency Grant allows UT to provide emergency grants for up to $1,000 per student to help pay for unexpected costs within 48 hours of the approved application.

UT is one of 32 four-year colleges in six states to be awarded $7.2 million in grant funding.

A student must meet income eligibility guidelines in order to receive a Dash Emergency Grant.

“Life is full of unexpected challenges and this grant provides another tool for us to help students through those emergencies so we can keep them in the classroom and on the path to graduation,” UT President Sharon L. Gaber said.

Dr. Michele Soliz, UT assistant vice president for student success and inclusion, focuses on strategic retention initiatives and will serve as program director.

“I’m excited we received this highly competitive award,” Soliz said. “Lack of financial aid is a main reason for not completing a degree. These funds will help students who find themselves in extreme circumstances that otherwise could mean the end of college. We will work collaboratively with partners across campus to make sure students are aware of these resources.”

The UT Office of Multicultural and Student Success is hosting information sessions in July and August about how the application process works. The program will begin providing grants to students in fall 2017.

Since 2012, Great Lakes Higher Education Corporation and Affiliates has committed $3 million to fund emergency grant programs at two-year colleges. This is the first time Great Lakes is providing Dash Emergency Grants to four-year colleges in Arkansas, Iowa, Minnesota, North Dakota, Ohio and Wisconsin.

“We’re pleased to extend our emergency grant program to four-year colleges dedicated to helping low-income students overcome financial obstacles,” said Richard D. George, president and chief executive officer of Great Lakes. “In addition to helping more students progress to degree completion, we look forward to learning the nuances between programs at two-year and four-year colleges and sharing that knowledge with other institutions looking to establish emergency grant programs.”

For more information, go to community.mygreatlakes.org/community/press-releases/issues/170615.


UToledo alumnus captured photos featured on new stamp commemorating total solar eclipse

In honor of the upcoming total solar eclipse, the U.S. Postal Service is debuting a trailblazing stamp that features two images captured by Fred Espenak, a University of Toledo alumnus and retired NASA astrophysicist affectionately known as Mr. Eclipse.

The Forever Stamp uses thermochromic ink and changes upon touch. With the heat of a finger, Espenak’s photo of the total eclipse of the sun transforms into an image of the full moon, also captured by Espenak.

“Other countries have used this technology, but it’s the first time in the United States,” Espenak said. “When you rub the stamp, a second image appears from the warmth of your finger. You’ll see the total eclipse of the sun and, with the touch of your finger, you’ll see the full moon.”

On Monday, Aug. 21, a total solar eclipse will be visible from the United States mainland for the first time in 38 years.

“The track of the moon’s shadow will cut diagonally across the nation from Oregon to South Carolina through 14 states,” Espenak said. “Inside the 70-mile-wide path of totality, the moon will completely cover the sun as the landscape is plunged into an unsettling twilight, and the sun’s glorious corona is revealed for more than two minutes.”

Espenak has had a long career of chasing eclipses around the world. Planes, trains and automobiles have taken Espenak to 27 total eclipses on seven continents.

Millions have seen his work; Espenak’s photos have been published in National Geographic, Nature and Newsweek.

To commemorate the Aug. 21 event, the Total Eclipse of the Sun Forever stamp will be released Tuesday, June 20, during a ceremony at the University of Wyoming in Laramie. Espenak and his wife will be there.

“I’m honored to have my photographs on a stamp. But more importantly, the stamp will spread the news about America’s Great Eclipse to many more people,” he said. “And what a fantastic opportunity. For a lot of people, this is the chance of a lifetime to see a total eclipse.”

“Fred Espenak is another great example of a ‘rocket scientist’ who has really lived up to that name,” said Dr. Karen Bjorkman, dean of the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics; Distinguished University Professor of Astronomy; and Helen Luedtke Brooks Endowed Professor of Astronomy. “He has made solid contributions to NASA science missions for many years, and also is doing a wonderful job of sharing his passion for and knowledge of eclipses with the public both on national and international stages. We’re really proud that he is an alumnus of The University of Toledo’s Department of Physics and Astronomy.”

Espenak will return to his alma mater to speak Thursday, June 15, at 6:30 p.m. in UT’s Memorial Field House Room 2100. He will preview the Great American Total Eclipse on Monday, Aug. 21 that will star the moon passing between the sun and Earth, which will be visible in the contiguous United States for the first time since 1979 — weather permitting.

During the free, public talk funded by the Helen Luedtke Brooks Endowed Professorship in Astronomy, the 1976 UT graduate who received a master of science degree in physics will discuss eclipses and share his eyewitness accounts around the globe through video and photos.

And he’ll offer two words of advice: road trip.

“I’m going to show people what they can expect to see in Toledo and how to watch it using safe eye protection, but I’m also going to encourage people to start making plans for a car trip to the eclipse path of totality because that’s where you have to be to see the total phase of the eclipse, and it’s worth the drive.

“It’s something you remember your entire life because it’s so unusual from anything you’ve seen before,” Espenak said. “The bright sun is completely gone in the sky, and you see this very strange-looking black disc, which is the unilluminated side of the moon, and it’s surrounded by this gossamer, feathery halo that’s the sun’s corona, which is two million degrees. It’s the only time you can see something that’s two million degrees with the naked eye. It’s such a stunning, overwhelming experience: The temperature drops probably 10 degrees as you go into totality, so you feel a chill in the air; animals react strangely; birds quiet down as if they’re going to roost at night.”

Espenak, a retired astrophysicist from NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, operates the Bifrost Astronomical Observatory in Portal, Ariz. He is the author of “Eclipse Bulletin: Total Solar Eclipse 2017” and “Road Atlas for the Total Solar Eclipse 2017.”

To view Espenak’s work, go to mreclipse.com.

For more about the commemorative stamp, go to about.usps.com/news/national-releases/2017/pr17_020.htm. The public is asked to share the news on social media using the hashtag #EclipseStamps.


UT to host author June 9, partner with Ghana schools throughout year

Yvonne Pointer, renowned youth advocate, author and philanthropist from Cleveland, will visit The University of Toledo along with two chiefs from West Africa to speak with the students of Toledo Excel’s Global Diversity Institute Friday, June 9.

The Global Diversity Institute is a program for fourth-year students that allows them to study the global community.

In 1984, Pointer’s 14-year-old daughter, Gloria, was the victim of a murder that took three decades to solve.

This tragedy started Pointer’s passion for improving the safety of communities around the world through programs that provide alternatives to violence and increase self-confidence.

She also has established three schools in Ghana, West Africa, in her daughter’s name.

Two prominent leaders from Ghana, Chief Nana Kodwo Eduakwa V and Chief Nana KraKwamina II, will join her at UT and speak to students about the areas they govern and how students can get involved.

Pointer will deliver her talk 11 a.m. Friday, June 9 in Memorial Field House Room 2200.

“I had heard bits and pieces of Pointer’s story over the years, but had the opportunity about a month ago to actually hear her speak and tell her full story in person at my church in Toledo,” said David Young, director of Toledo Excel.

“The timing was perfect because our staff was developing our curriculum for Global Diversity. I had been giving a great deal of thought to our students studying countries on the continent of Africa as we had done in the past, so when I heard Pointer’s amazing connection to Ghana, I saw the potential for a wonderful partnership.”

Through a partnership with the three schools in Ghana, Toledo Excel students will have the opportunity to study and connect with their peers in the country throughout the year.

“Students gain insight into the effects of history, geography and politics on the human rights of individuals. They study specific countries and their cultures, and when possible connect with those countries through cultural exchange and service,” Young explained.

“They gain a better understanding of how small a place the world is and the importance of a global marketplace and economy. The cultural and academic enrichment gained enables students to better understand how their career aspirations might connect with international opportunities.”

For 28 years, UT’s Toledo Excel has provided college preparation and scholarships to underrepresented students, including African, Asian, Hispanic and Native Americans.

Through services such as summer institutes, academic retreat weekends, campus visits and guidance through the admission process, students increase their self-esteem, cultural awareness and civic involvement.


State renews grant to support UT Minority Business Assistance Center Program operations

The state awarded The University of Toledo a $330,000, two-year grant to continue to host the Minority Business Assistance Center Program that serves the 17-county region.

The program, which supports economic development in northwest Ohio by providing resources for minority-owned, early stage businesses, is housed in the UT Minority Business Development Center (MBDC) on Scott Park Campus and funded through the Ohio Development Services Agency Minority Business Development Division.

“The University of Toledo Minority Business Development Center is once again glad to be selected an award site for this important grant,” said Dr. Shanda Gore, associate vice president of the Minority Business Development Center and the Catharine S. Eberly Center for Women. “We are one of the few incubators in the country that focuses on minority businesses. This award supports our commitment to the community, our students and research to support business growth and economic development.”

The program offers no-cost counseling, state certification support and trainings focused on creating jobs and increasing sales.

“Through our partnerships across the state, minority-owned businesses will be better supported in their growth and development,” said Jeffrey L. Johnson, chief of the Minority Business Development Division at the Ohio Development Services Agency.

The grant will be used in Toledo to hire a regional director and an operations manager.

Last year the MBDC’s 11 member companies and 11 affiliate companies supported 97 jobs and generated $15.5 million in sales.

Since receiving the state grant in 2015, the Minority Business Assistance Center Program in Toledo engaged 211 new clients. It helped 33 companies earn minority business certification and helped 37 earn EDGE certification, which recognizes workplace gender equality.

In two years, $2.3 million in capital was awarded in approved state bonds to minority-owned businesses that grew with the help of the program. The companies also were awarded 649 public sector contracts valued at $22.3 million. In the first grant-cycle period, 2,400 jobs were retained and 110 jobs were created.


UTMC to celebrate cancer survivors with reception June 8

In honor of June being National Cancer Survivor Month, the Eleanor N. Dana Cancer Center at The University of Toledo is honoring cancer survivors with a celebration reception on Thursday, June 8.

Registration begins at 5:30 p.m., and the free program starts at 6:10 p.m. Each cancer survivor can bring a guest.

“Every year of survivorship is a reason for joy,” said Renee Schick, manager of the UTMC Survivor Shop and cancer survivor. “We believe it is important to celebrate all cancer survivors and their unique experiences, as well as provide continued support and connect them to community resources available as they continue their journey.”

The celebration will bring together survivors to share their stories and introduce various community services and organizations. The event features door prizes and music. Food and beverages will be served.

Guests will also have the opportunity to have their photo taken with Porshia, UTMC’s therapy dog.

Register by calling 419.383.5243 or email EleanorNDanaCancerCenter@utoledo.edu.


UT professor, students part of team selected to participate in $5 million national solar competition

A University of Toledo physics professor and students are members of a Toledo team awarded $60,000 from the U.S. Department of Energy to participate in a $5 million prize competition called the Solar in Your Community Challenge.

The team, which is named Glass City Community Solar, aims to expand solar electricity access to low- and moderate-income residents. It’s comprised of community partners, including UT, Vistula Management Co., Toledo-Lucas County Port Authority and City of Toledo.

The Glass City Community Solar team is one of 35 teams nationally to be selected to receive seed funds from the U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative to support project planning and to raise awareness. All teams will compete for $1 million in prizes, which will be awarded by judges based on each project or program’s innovation, impact and replicability.

Over the next 18 months, Glass City Community Solar will demonstrate innovative financing for commercial solar installations.

“It is extremely exciting for us to be able to have a hand in a project that has so much potential to benefit families by reducing electric bills, as well as educating the Toledo community about the use of renewable energy,” said UT student Blaine Luszcak, who is co-president of the UT student group called Building Ohio’s Sustainable Energy Future.

Glass City Community Solar will develop 300 to 750 kW of photovoltaic systems on rooftops and vacant lots to serve low- and moderate-income housing across the metro Toledo area. The cost savings will reduce electricity expenses and also will support residents interested in pursuing education and training in the solar energy field.

“Our students will benefit tremendously from these real-world photovoltaic projects, as they create an extended learning lab that will result in several large, operational photovoltaic power systems,” Dr. Randy Ellingson, UT professor of physics, said.

“We are thrilled that our team was selected to join the challenge,” said John Kiely, president of Vistula Management Co. and the team leader of Glass City Community Solar. “Our projects will benefit the people of Lucas County, and bring The University of Toledo’s leadership and passion for photovoltaic technology to real-world applications that benefit the people in our community that need it most.”

Find more information about the competition at solarinyourcommunity.org.


New dean selected to lead UT College of Engineering

A civil and environmental engineer with a focus on design and construction innovation and safety will join The University of Toledo as the leader of the College of Engineering effective Aug. 1.

Dr. Michael Toole comes to UT from Bucknell University in Pennsylvania. Over his 18 years at Bucknell, he served as professor of civil and environmental engineering, associate dean of engineering, director of the Grand Challenge Scholars Program and director of the Institute for Leadership in Technology and Management. During the current academic year, Toole has been a faculty fellow associated with the Partnership for Achieving Construction Excellence at Pennsylvania State University’s Department of Architectural Engineering.

“We are excited to welcome Dr. Michael Toole to The University of Toledo,” Dr. Andrew Hsu, provost and executive vice president for academic affairs, said. “His robust experience in higher education, the private sector and the U.S. Navy Civil Engineering Corps will enhance and strengthen our commitment to research and training in the College of Engineering.”

Dr. Michael Toole

“I can’t wait to begin working with the excellent faculty and staff at UT to help provide quality engineering education that strengthens the Toledo region, as well as our nation,” Toole said. “The commitment on campus to achieve excellence in both teaching and research is inspiring. The strong co-op program, extensive research facilities and wonderful ties with regional industry partners make this opportunity very compelling.”

Prior to Bucknell University, Toole worked at Packer Engineering as director of construction systems and vice president of HomeCAD; Ryland Homes as purchasing and construction services manager; Tonyan Composites Corporation as president and co-founder; Massachusetts Institute of Technology as an instructor of business and technology strategy; Brown and Root Services Corporation as project manager; and the U.S. Navy Civil Engineer Corps as assistant resident officer in charge of construction and company commander in a SEABEE battalion.

Toole earned a PhD in technology strategy and a master’s in civil engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He has a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering from Bucknell University.

Toole is a fellow of the American Society of Civil Engineers and a member of the National Academy of Engineering Grand Challenge Scholars Program Steering Committee, the American Society of Safety Engineers and the American Society of Engineering Education. Toole won teaching awards at MIT and Bucknell and received two best paper awards from ASCE.

“My primary goal for the foreseeable future is to strengthen the scholarly profile for UT’s College of Engineering,” Toole said. “Securing funded research is an integral part of our mission because acquiring new knowledge leads to vibrancy within classrooms and throughout campus.”

“I would like to take this opportunity to thank Dr. Steve LeBlanc for his leadership as interim dean of the College of Engineering since January,” Hsu said. “Dr. LeBlanc and the engineering faculty have made tremendous progress in moving the college forward.”