UT College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences News

Posts Tagged ‘faculty recognition’

Dr. Martin Ohlinger receives national recognition

Dr. Ohlinger delivers his talk: “Shock in Atrial Fibrillation: Which Pharmacologic Agent Should I Use?”

Dr. Martin Ohlinger, a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice and director of both the College Honors Program and the Critical Care Residency in the Department of Pharmacy Practice, was recognized at the Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) Annual Congress. More than 6,000 physicians, nurses, pharmacists, and other critical care professionals attended the meeting, held Jan 21-25 in Honolulu this year.

Dr. Ohlinger was invited to speak about “Shock in Atrial Fibrillation: Which Pharmacologic Agent Should I Use?”. At the meeting, he was awarded the Presidential Citation for contributions to SCCM, including serving on the American College of Critical Care Medicine Credentials Committee, which selects new fellows each year; he was also recognized at the meeting during the Convocation of Fellows & Society of Critical Care Medicine Awards and Grants Presentation for “SCCM members who have made extraordinary contributions of time, energy, and resources to SCCM during the previous year.”

In addition, Dr. Ohlinger, who is a board certified critical care pharmacist (BCCCP), was selected as one of 15 critical care specialists from across the US to serve on the Board of Pharmacy Specialties’ (BPS) national working group to complete a Role Delineation Study that outlines the standards for being a Board Certified Critical Care Pharmacist.


State of the College 2016

Since 2013, Dean Early has delivered a State of the College address each fall at the Honors and Awards Convocation, a ceremony that recognizes student achievement and honors the donors and friends of the college. This year’s address focused on the return on investment seen by donors, new academic programs, the uniqueness of the college’s programs, and research.

Slideshow of presentation


Research Excellence Award for Dr. Tiwari

Dr. Amit Tiwari, assistant professor in the Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, recently spent some time in India as a visiting scientist and professor at Rajiv Gandhi Prodyogik Vishwavidyalaya (RGPV). RGPV is the world’s 28th largest university, with a student population of over 260,000. Dr. Tiwari’s visit was part of a research collaboration in the area of oncology drug discovery, which attracted the attention of the national media and several university and government officials, including the president of the university and the Governor of State, Chief Secretary, Principal Secretary of the State, Education Minister and former Home Minister of the State.

During his time at RGPV, Dr. Tiwari received an Outstanding Scientist award for Excellence in Innovative Research.


Rising in the Ranks

Recently, the U.S. News and World Report updated its rankings of pharmacy schools. Always highly regarded, the College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences was first ranked by this publication in 2012 as a result of concerted efforts by the college to expand external communications and spread the word about our programs and people.

The newest rankings show an improvement for the college, from number 62 among over 80 ranked colleges to number 60 of over 100 ranked schools, indicating the persistently high regard for the program, even in a time of fiscal austerity.

The College continues to engage in the activities that moved it onto the lists of ranked colleges through its learners, faculty and staff and their efforts in academics and service in key roles in state and national pharmacy organizations.  The college’s complex and comprehensive program of twelve curricula pioneered the Pharmacy Summer Camp as a recruitment tool for pharmacy and the pharmaceutical sciences.  An added offering is the teaching certificate for pharmacy residents.

The College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences attracts high achieving learners to its BS in Pharmaceutical Sciences majors in cosmetic science and formulation design, pharmacology and toxicology, pharmaceutics, medicinal chemistry, and pharmacy administration (with a minor in business).  Future practitioners enroll in the college’s highly competitive PharmD program and study in the clinics and pharmacies of the University of Toledo Medical Center.  Learners who are focused on research continue in the MS and PhD programs, the latter of which include medicinal chemistry and experimental therapeutics.  Students have the opportunity to earn dual-degrees, including the BSPS/MS degree in medicinal chemistry, the PharmD/MS in health outcomes and socioeconomic sciences or the PharmD/PhD in medicinal chemistry.  The PharmD/MBA is the college’s newest dual-degree program. Learners also enhance their clinical skills in the PGY1, PGY2, or Kroger Community Pharmacy residency programs.


Dean Early leads in Leadership Fellows program

Dean Early is currently serving as a Leadership Facilitator for the Academic Leadership Fellows Program (ALFP). He was selected by the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy as a result of his highly successful leadership career and his experience and insight into leadership. The role of the Leadership Facilitator is to provide guidance and feedback on the Fellows’ individual personal and professional goals, as well as team projects.

The Academic Leadership Fellows Program is focused on the development of leaders in academic pharmacy and higher education. Fellows build relationships with colleagues from other institutions and from within the college and university. Each ALFP cohort has 30 Fellows, most of whom are mid-level faculty in pharmaceutical science, pharmacy practice, or Social and Administrative Sciences and have some type of current or projected leadership role in their college/school of pharmacy.

This year’s cohort of Fellows includes one UT faculty member, Dr. Amanda Bryant-Friedrich, an associate professor of medicinal chemistry and director of the newly established Shimadzu Laboratory for Pharmaceutical Research Excellence. A UT alumnus, Oscar Garza, is also a fellow this year. Dr. Garza earned a BS in Pharmaceutical Sciences at The University of Toledo and is now an assistant professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Care and Health Systems at University of Minnesota College of Pharmacy.


April 2015 Refill e-newsletter

The April 2015 issue of Refill, the e-newsletter of The University of Toledo College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, is now available online.

In this issue:

  • RADM Helena Mishoe to receive honorary doctorate
  • Visit from Steven W. Schierholt, Esq., Executive Director of the Ohio State Board of Pharmacy
  • Patient education saves a life by Hanin Chouman
  • Alumnus Alex Adams, PharmD ’09, receives national leadership award
  • Alice H. Skeens Award for Dr. Amanda Bryant-Friedrich
  • Alumna Alison Wery, BSPS ’14, embarks on a career in cosmetic formulation
  • Student awards and presentations
  • OPA Student Legislative Day
  • Meet Dr. Amit K. Tiwari and Angela Lopez, M.Ed.
  • Thank you to donors
  • Calendar of events

March 2015 Refill e-newsletter

The March 2015 issue of Refill, the e-newsletter of The University of Toledo College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, is now available online.

In this Women’s History Month issue:

  • Dr. Sharrel Pinto leads national medication adherence study
  • Bess G. Emch, the college’s first female dean, paved the way for women
  • Dr. McInerney’s type 1 diabetes research
  • Dr. Sawsan Abuhamdah’s Fulbright research
  • Tips for Women in Science, Dr. Amanda Bryant-Friedrich
  • A warm welcome: Audra Wilson
  • Special thanks to pharmacy donors
  • Grandmother’s tea: Dr. Early’s introduction to pharmacy
  • Equipment funds support research and learning
  • Cosmetic science symposium review (part II), Hillary Phillis
  • Calendar of events: Law CE, Preceptor Forum, Golf Outing

Type 1 Diabetes: Following the Cells

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Dr. Marcia McInerney, pictured above with students in her lab, describes her new R15 NIH grant that explores the cellular mechanisms behind type I diabetes.

DIABETES IN AMERICA

Type 1 insulin-dependent diabetes affects some 15 million people worldwide, with three million in the US. More than 15,000 children and 15,000 adults are diagnosed with type 1 diabetes each year in the US. Furthermore, the incidence of type 1 diabetes for children under fourteen years of age is estimated to increase by 3% annually worldwide. In type 1 diabetes, pancreatic beta cells, the only cells in the body that secrete insulin, are destroyed. Because insulin controls the usage of sugar in the body, which allows cells to be fed, glucose levels in the blood and urine rise when insulin is not present, leading to the clinical symptoms of diabetes. Diabetes is controlled by insulin injection; however, secondary complications of diabetes include heart disease, blindness, kidney failure, poor circulation and wound healing, and increased risk of infection. The healthcare cost for type 1 diabetes in the US is close to $15 billion each year.

IMMUNE RESPONSE IN T1D

The immune system, which includes white blood cells or lymphocytes, is responsible for recognizing and destroying foreign invaders such as bacteria and viruses. While the immune system does not normally respond to any self-components, in autoimmune disease, the immune system recognizes some self-tissue as “foreign” and destroys it; this is what happens in type 1 diabetes. In a process called insulitis, lymphocytes enter the islets of Langerhans in the pancreas, where the beta cells, the only cells in the body that produce insulin, live. The lymphocytes destroy the beta cells. Once they are destroyed, the body can no longer make insulin and it must be provided by injections.

Why do lymphocytes move into the pancreas? Insulin binds the insulin receptor, and a signal is given to transport glucose so that cells can be fed, and this overall operation maintains homeostasis. Along with binding insulin and signaling for glucose transport, the insulin receptor also moves in response to chemical stimuli. Therefore, cells that have many insulin receptors on their cell surface can physically move toward insulin. If lymphocytes have receptors for insulin on their surface, insulin secretion might draw lymphocytes to the pancreas and into the islets.

STUDENT INVOLVEMENT

Dr. McInerney has worked on research projects in her laboratory with 11 honor thesis students, 3 students who obtained the summer undergraduate research fellowship, 1 research apprenticeship in science student, 14 undergraduate students with independent research projects or full time internship research, and a high school student whose work in the laboratory won her the Regional and State competition at the Ohio Science Fair. Additionally, Dr. McInerney has been involved with research/teaching of 21 PhD students, including 6 as the major advisor, and 12 master’s students, including 8 as the major advisor. She has also published a number of papers with undergraduate and graduate student authors, with several as first authors.

Students have worked in Dr. McInerney’s laboratory on research supported by NIH, USDA, American Diabetes Association, Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, and Diabetes Action Research and Education Foundation. Her new award will directly support and enhance undergraduate and graduate research in her laboratory.


Dr. Bryant-Friedrich receives American Chemistry Society award

Dr. Amanda Bryant-Friedrich was honored by the American Chemistry Society’s Committee on Minority Affairs with the Stanley C. Israel Regional Award for Advancing Diversity in the Chemical Sciences.

The Stanley C. Israel Regional Award recognizes individuals and/or institutions who have advanced diversity in the chemical sciences and significantly stimulated or fostered activities that promote inclusiveness within the region.

The award included travel accommodations and registration for the Central Regional Meeting and recognized Dr. Bryant-Friedrich’s mentorship and dedication. She was nominated by Dr. Isabel Escobar, professor of chemical and environmental engineering and associate dean for research development and outreach in The University of Toledo College of Engineering.


Addiction researcher joins Department of Pharmacology

The research of Dr. F. Scott Hall, the newest faculty member in the Department of Pharmacology, is focused on psychiatric disorders and addiction. After earning his bachelor’s degree in psychology from Harvard College, he completed a doctorate in neurobiology at Cambridge University. As a post-doctoral fellow with the National Institute on Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse, Dr. Hall studied gene-environment interactions on psychobehavioral characteristics. The author of over 100 scientific articles, Dr. Hall has expertise in developmental influences on sensitivity to addictive substances.