UT School of Visual & Performing Arts

UT exhibit features artists with special needs

The University of Toledo’s Center for Visual Arts is offering a collaborative exhibition of work from artists working in studio art programs facilitated for adults with special needs.

IMG-1742-jpg-1‘One Way or Another’ at the University of Toledo Center for Visual Arts showcases the works of five arists taking part in studio art programs for adults with special needs.

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The show, One Way or Another, opened last week in the CVA Gallery, and will close Nov. 8. The exhibition of work by five chosen artists will also include photos and videos that showcase each person’s artistic path to create his or her work.

It is curated by artist Brian Kavanaugh, who is….(Read more at ToledoBlade.com)

http://www.toledoblade.com/Art/2017/10/25/UT-exhibit-features-artists-with-special-needs-1.html


University of Toledo’s art foundry fires up imagination

Artist Chad Rimer remembers the electricity he felt working in the foundry at the University of Toledo’s art department like it was yesterday.

“I miss the rush, the excitement, the glowing metal, the heat,” he said recently from Brooklyn, where he works as production manager for internationally known sculptor Tom Otterness. “You don’t know how your casting is going to turn out. It was fascinating to see what happened; did you do everything right, did it turn out well? It’s like opening a Christmas present.”Photo of metal pouring at UT

(Read full article – Toledo Blade online)


Art by UT students in spotlight at juried exhibition

More than 30 works of art by UT students are on display in the 2017 Juried Student Exhibition in the Center for the Visual Arts Gallery on the University’s Toledo Museum of Art Campus.

An opening reception and award ceremony will take place Thursday, March 16, from 6 to 8 p.m. in the gallery.

“Girl With Meat” by Clairissa Martin, right, and “Political Balance” by Valerie White are included in the 2017 Juried Student Exhibition.

This year’s juror is Clara DeGalan, who was born and raised in Detroit. She attended the Detroit High School for the Fine and Performing Arts, earned a bachelor of fine arts degree at the University of Michigan, and a master of fine arts degree in painting at Wayne State University. She teaches drawing and painting at Wayne State University and Madonna University, and writes art criticism for Detroit Art Review and InfiniteMile Detroit.

The awards ceremony will coincide with the Arts Commission 3rd Thursday Loop as the Center for the Visual Arts is one of the galleries on the route.

The free, public exhibition will be on display through Friday, March 24. Gallery hours are Monday through Saturday from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.

For more information on the exhibition, contact Brian Carpenter, UT gallery director and lecturer in the Art Department, at brian.carpenter@utoledo.edu.


Review of the “Heterogeneous: States of American,” exhibition curated by Brian Carpenter

A recent review from the  exhibition,

“Heterogeneous: States of American,” Josh Byers, David Cuatlacuatl, and Faith Goodman @ River House Arts

 curated by Brian Carpenter and the Contemporary Art Toledo exhibition that is currently up at River House Arts (featuring UT Art Department alumna Faith Goodman).

https://loranitude.wordpress.com/tag/toledo-contemporary-art/


“Piece it Together” exhibition review article published in natbrut

Just wanted to share the release of the Nat.Brut article featuring Beryl Satter’s essay and art work from the CVA’s gallery exhibition Piece it Together.

http://www.natbrut.com


Fred Wilson Field Trip

© Mysoon Rizk, PhD / November 2016

On November 3, 2016, a colleague and I drove six students for an hour and a half to Oberlin, Ohio, to hear African-American artist Fred Wilson (b.1954) speak about his work on the occasion of two exhibitions he installed this past year at Oberlin College’s Allen Memorial Art Museum in this small college town (my alma mater). We were already familiar with the artist, each one of us having often admired his black glass sculpture Iago’s Mirror (2009), acquired by the Toledo Museum of Art (TMA) in 2010 — and currently on view in the TMA’s Gallery 6 for the temporary exhibition Shakespeare’s Characters: Playing the Part. Listening to a talk by the 1999 recipient of a John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation’s “genius” grant was inspiring and exciting. Getting to see his work in both a solo exhibition (Fred Wilson: Black to the Powers of Ten) and in the site-specific installation Wildfire Test Pit was amazing.

As a generous, instructive, insightful orator, Fred Wilson was spectacular, sharing slides as he described an artistic trajectory and longtime interest in understanding museums through their collections (“what’s there, what’s not there”). Starting out by invitation from the Maryland Historical Society, his attention began training on the Atlantic slave trade, the Indian slave trade, and movements of oil — or as he came to call such dynamics, Movement of Blackness. Giving form to institutional memory by “mining” museum collections, Wilson would feature decommissioned possessions, like slave shackles or a public whipping post, side by side with an institution’s finest silver and furniture. He spoke about installing over 50 portraits of Daniel Webster at the Hood Museum, in Dartmouth College, at the same time as a series of plaster cast busts identifying human specimens from around the world. In the case of the latter, Wilson hid racial inscriptions with sashes of mourning, to encourage viewers to see them as people, including a cast of Ota Benga, the Congolese youth exhibited at the World’s Fair in St. Louis, Missouri, in 1904 who would end up committing suicide in Virginia 12 years later.

In mining the Allen Memorial Art Museum at Oberlin, Mr. Wilson found himself magnetized by Edmonia Lewis whose story “remains obscured by rumor and mystery” as one scholar puts it. An orphan of African-American and Native-American heritage from New York, Lewis began to study art at Oberlin College in 1859. A few months after the Civil War had begun, she was accused of poisoning two (white) friends, beaten by a mob, arrested, and tried. Although acquitted, she remained a target and eventually left without graduating. Heading to Boston, she secured further artistic training, before taking up residency in Rome, Italy for a few years, where Lewis enjoyed success for her marble statuary. After returning to the States she disappears from the historical record. Wilson called the nineteenth-century sculptor a “guiding light” for his site-specific installation at the Oberlin museum, which he entitled Wildfire Test Pit for the Indian name given to Edmonia Lewis and the “archaeological term for a site you dig to see what’s there.”

Our field trip to Oberlin proved intensely rewarding, inspiring reflection long afterward: on the creative process, erasure and exclusion, the construct of race as well as concepts of time or memory, the roles of museums in compressing histories, individuals recorded and those forgotten, objects acknowledged and those to be buried. In the coming weeks, students will be sharing their own thoughts about the opportunity to hear from a practicing contemporary artist and to experience the work firsthand. Please stay tuned! Fred Wilson’s work remains on view at the Allen Memorial Art Museum until June 2017.


UT Art faculty member work accepted to international juried exhibition

deborloffwinner
Deborah Orloff, Professor of Art and Associate Chair of the Department of Art at The University of Toledo, has just been chosen to exhibit her new work in “Macro” an internationally juried exhibition at New York City’s Jadite Gallery. She also won a second place award from the New York Center for Photographic Art for the piece, and will have the work published in the exhibition catalog. The competitively selected exhibition was curated from an international pool of over 500 entries and will open April 21st. The attached diptych is from her current body of work, “Elusive Memory.”
In addition, 6 of Orloff’s large-scale photographs from this series were recently selected for a curated exhibition at the Riffe Gallery in Columbus, Ohio, opposite the State House at Capitol Square. The group show, “Earthly Delights,” will feature 10 artists’ photographic work and run August 4 – October 8. Five other large-scale pieces from “Elusive Memory” are currently on view at the Toledo Museum of Art Library in UT’s Center for Visual Arts through the end of the semester.
Samples of Orloff’s work can be seen on the web at DeborahOrloff.com  and Deborah Orloff: Elusive Memory http://www.deborahorloff.com/ElusGal.html
Artist’s Statement:
Elusive Memory
“In America, the photographer is not simply the person who records the past, but the one who invents it.” – Susan Sontag
Do you really remember your past, or have you simply seen the photographs so many times, you believe you retain those memories? The relationship between photography and memory is complicated; it is dubious at best. I have always been fascinated with family photos and have collected them most of my life. Recently, I’ve been drawn to the abandoned pictures that were relegated to my parents’ basement. These once precious objects have been neglected and forgotten. Inadvertently exposed to water, heat, and humidity, they have undergone a powerful transformation. This new work utilizes these severely damaged pictures as subject matter. Elusive Memory explores the significance of vernacular photographs as aesthetic objects and cultural artifacts. The resulting large-scale photographs make commonplace objects monumental and emphasize their unique details. In their final representation, these banal objects become simulacra of loss and speak eloquently to the ephemeral nature of memory.
Bio
Deborah Orloff has run the Photography area at the University of Toledo‘s Center for Visual Arts and exhibited her artwork internationally for more than 20 years. She has won numerous awards for both her artwork as well as her teaching. She received her MFA in Photography from Syracuse University and her BFA from Clark University. Her work has been included in over 100 exhibitions at national and international venues that include: the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York City, and the Royal Scottish Academy in Edinburgh, Scotland. Orloff’s new work, Elusive Memory, was recently selected for inclusion in the Museum of Contemporary Photography’s collection as part of their Midwest Photographers Project.
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Contact:
Deborah Orloff
419-530-8314 (office) or 419-882-7631 (home)

 


UT STUDENT ARTWORK ON LOCAL DIGITAL BILLBOARDS

The University of Toledo student artwork to appear on area digital billboards January – February, 2016

 

In collaboration with Lamar Outdoor Advertising, University of Toledo Department of Art students have been invited to display their work on digital billboards throughout the Toledo area. Many students submitted entries. The works chosen will be on display until the end of February 2016.

Assistant professor of art, Barry Whittaker, who coordinated the project, says this is the fourth year UT art students have been invited to have their work displayed. To see the images in this year’s exhibition, visit the online photos album “UT Art Student Billboards 2016” on Facebook.

Student artists participating in this year’s exhibition:

Nikka Geiermann

Katelyn Greenhill

Crystal Hand

Isabel Isaza

Kayla Kirk

Mike Miller

Joseph Okoyomo

Emily Rose

Abbey Ruppel

Brandy Save

Chelsea Thompson

Michelle Trivisonno

Mark Yappueying

Visit the UT Department of Art at http://www.utoledo.edu/comm-arts/art/index.html

The billboards can be found at: Reynolds Road/Corner of Glendale, The Anthony Wayne Trail at City Park, The corner of Alexis and Lewis, Monroe Street/Corner of Laskey, Byrne Road/Airport Highway, Monroe Street/West corner of Douglas, and Erie at Monroe

Mike Miller- UT student art

Source: UT Department of Art – Facebook


UT Presents Play – No Exit

University of Toledo to present Sartre’s NO EXIT

The University of Toledo Department of Theatre & Film, will present its production of philosopher Jean-Paul Sartre’s existentialist play, NO EXIT, in February. The play will be directed by UT Theatre student, Andrés Medina.

Performances are Friday, February 19 through Sunday, February 21, and Friday, February 26 through Sunday, February 28. All performances will start at 7:30 p.m., except for Sundays which are at 2 p.m.

NO EXIT written by Jean-Paul Sartre, takes place in hell where three souls are mysteriously placed in the same room. There they are trapped together for eternity, where they begin to realize the binding force keeping them there, is one from within. During the course of the play the characters reflect on their past, and share all of the unforgivable things they have done throughout their lives. The classic theme, “Hell is other people,” is presented as the story begins to unfold.

Medina says he is excited to explore the play’s theme of life after death and intrigued by Sartre’s philosophy. “Everybody wonders about death and the meaning of life. I was also interested in Sartre’s philosophy that human beings supply meaning to the big questions of life and death out of their own experience of each.”

The set will be minimalist says, Medina. “Especially with this kind of play, I prefer to rely on movement, on the actors and their characters, to captivate the audience and hold their interest.”

Medina is a UT senior majoring in Theatre. While NO EXIT is his directorial debut, he assistant directed the UT productions of “Cabaret” and “The Adding Machine.” “The Adding Machine” was invited to be performed at the 2015 Kennedy Center American College Theatre Festival, Region 2. He was also the Assistant Stage Manager for UT’s production of “Orpheus.” Professionally, he served as the Stage manager for the Glacity Theatre Collective’s production of  “House of Vinyl.”

On stage, Medina has played roles in various UT-produced plays such as “Twelfth Night,” “Miss Julie,” “Cabaret,” “Out to Lunch,” “Ghost Light,” “Three Sisters,” “Metamorphoses,” and “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” His professional acting credits include a role in Glacity Theatre Collective’s “Nightmares Come in Threes.”

Prices for performances of NO EXIT are: $8 – Students, Children; $10 – Seniors (60+), Military, UT Faculty/Staff/Alumni; $15 General Public. To purchase tickets or for more information on this event, visit www.utoledo.tix.com or call 419.530.ARTS (2787)

Cast

·       “Garcin”  Davion T. Brown (double-majoring in Theatre and Communication at UT, senior)

·       “Inez” Olivia M. Pierce (majoring in Theatre and minoring in Art at UT, junior)

·       “Estelle” Christina M. Pinciotti (majoring in Theatre and minoring in Communication at UT, junior)

·       “Valet” Reshi Phillips (double majoring in Theatre & Film at UT, sophomore)

For more information about other events presented by the UT College of Communication and the Arts and its programs, visit www.utoledo.edu/cocaevents.

 

 

Twelfth Night Center for Performing Arts Center Theatre

Twelfth Night – Center for Performing Arts Center Theatre


UT to present two concerts on the TMA Great Performances in the Great Gallery Series – February 14 and 21

UT to present two concerts on the Toledo Museum of Art Great Performances in the Great Gallery Series – February 14 and 21

 

The Toledo Museum of Art Great Performances in the Great Gallery series will include two performances – one featuring University of Toledo students and another featuring UT faculty and internationally-acclaimed baritone, Ryan De Ryke.

Sunday, February 14 at 3 p.m. voice and piano students from the UT Department of Music will perform a range of selections from operas and favorite vocal music. The following Sunday, February 21 at 3 p.m., UT professor of piano, Dr. Michael Boyd and De Ryke will perform a program of art song. Highlights from the program include Schumann’s “Dichterliebe” and a cycle of songs by The Smiths arranged by Ryan. Admission to both concerts is free and open to the public.

Current professor of piano at UT – Dr. Boyd received his undergraduate degree from the Wisconsin Conservatory of Music, and his master’s and doctoral degrees from Eastman School of Music. Over the years he has given many solo recitals across the country and internationally.

Baritone Ryan De Ryke has studied at the Peabody Conservatory, the RAM, and the National Conservatory of Luxemburg. Aside from his recital career De Ryke is also a regularly traveling soloist in various oratorios. He has worked numerous operatic roles, and has had the opportunity to work with a variety of different groups such as the Haymarket Opera, El Paso Symphony Orchestra, and the Chamber of Chicago.

For more information on these events, visit the museum’s website at http://www.toledomuseum.org/calendar/

For information on other UT arts events, visit http://www.utoledo.edu/cocaevents/index.html

Source: Michael Boyd

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Source: UT Department of Music