UToledo School of Visual and Performing Arts

Posts Tagged ‘art’

Inside the Panorama: Q&A with Natalie Lanese

Lanese photo instagram

An outside view of the installation in progress. Photo by Natalie Lanese

PANORAMA, an installation by Natalie Lanese, combines collage and pop patterns to set up narratives that address, oftentimes humorously, the more serious realities of American culture. Lanese’s massive scale patterns transform into a geometric landscape in which the collaged elements create conceptual spaces and confront ideas of image vs. reality, depth, and depthlessness.

On Friday night, August 23, from 6-8 p.m., join us for the opening of “PANORAMA,” an eye-popping installation of pulsating stripes and pastries. Meet the artist, Natalie Lanese, and experience the CVA Gallery as you’ve never seen it before.

Natalie was kind enough to tell us a bit about her art, her work process, and her inspirations.

For folks who haven’t had the benefit of watching this installation unfold over the past few weeks, what is your process for developing and creating an installation like this? How long does it take to create? Do you have help?

I usually have a general idea of the shape of the piece before I begin, but I do all of the decision-making in the gallery. Since these installations are site-specific, I have to respond to the space and design the work in the gallery. The dark gray walls in the CVA Gallery required that I paint the area white before adding color. Then I draw the pattern on the wall and start painting. For this piece, painting took almost 2 full weeks. I had the help of some very generous students in the second week. The final few days are spent working on the collage: printing, cutting out the shapes, and adhering them to the wall.

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UT Students, Professor Featured in Wolfe Gallery Exhibit; Reception Held August 30

An upcoming exhibition of prints at the Wolfe Gallery at Maumee Valley Country Day School, titled 2013 Impression Printmaking Exhibition will feature the work of college art students and their professors. The University of Toledo will be represented by works from Associate Professor of Art Arturo Rodriguez, BFA student Eric Broz, and recent BFA graduates Lisa Franko, David Folck, Kevin Leiter and Hannah Lehmann.

Other participants in the show include selected students and faculty from Bowling Green State University, Columbus College of Art & Design and Florida State University. The exhibition is directed and curated by Joseph Van Kerkhove, Adjunct Instructor of Art at Tiffin University.

The show will be on display from August 19 through October 11. A reception with the artists will be held in Wolfe Gallery on Friday, August 30, from 6-8 p.m. The gallery is located at Maumee Valley Country Day School, at 1715 S. Reynolds Road, Toledo, Ohio, 43614. For more information, contact Van Kerkhove at vankerkhovejm@tiffin.edu or LouAnn Glover at lglover@mvcds.org


PANORAMA on display at CVA Gallery through September 28

brightly colored mural/installation by Natalie Lanese

An installation by Natalie Lanese, whose “PANORAMA” will be on display in the CVA Gallery through September 28.

PANORAMA, an installation by Natalie Lanese, combines collage and pop patterns to set up narratives that address, oftentimes humorously, the more serious realities of American culture.  Lanese’s massive scale patterns transform into a geometric landscape in which the collaged elements create conceptual spaces and confront ideas of image vs. reality, depth, and depthlessness.

PANORAMA will be on display at the Center for Visual Arts Gallery. The opening reception will be held on Friday, August 23 from 6-8 p.m. at the Center for Visual Arts Gallery. The installation will remain on display through September.

Natalie Lanese has recently exhibited at Jack the Pelican Presents in Brooklyn, the deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum in Lincoln, MA, Montserrat College of Art in Beverly, MA, and Scope International Art Fair in Basel, Switzerland.  Lanese is Assistant Professor of Art and Gallery Director at Siena Heights University in Adrian, MI and resides in Toledo, Ohio.

The Center for Visual Arts is located at 620 Grove Place in Toledo, adjacent to the Toledo Museum of Art. For more information, contact CVA Gallery Director Ben Pond.


Gross Anatomy – UT student works – on display at Imagination Station through September 2

UT student works on display in "Gross Anatomy" at Imagination Station

UT student works on display in “Gross Anatomy” at Imagination Station

“More Eyeballs,” “Section of the Neck,” and “Relax” are a few of the 11 works of art by University of Toledo students currently on display at the Imagination Station. Using the book Gray’s Anatomy as inspiration, students in Arturo Rodriguez’s Lithography class and Ben Pond’s Anatomy class collaborated on a large bound book project called Gross Anatomy. Students used lithography as the basis for their initial drawing and then embellished the pages with additional drawing media. Two copies of the large book were created and another series of prints was made for display. One book was donated to the library at the UT Medical Center, and the other to the Toledo Museum of Art library, where it is currently on view. The project was made during fall semester, 2012.

Works on display at the Imagination Station were created by Alyssa Brown, Stacey Cruzado, Sarah Emch, David Folck, Lisa Franko & Wes Rucker, Dylan Gallagher, Katie Heft, Dingzhong Hu, Josh Klein, and Shirley Mei.

This exhibition, like Grossology, runs through September 2. For more information about admission and hours of operation, visit the Imagination Station website at www.imaginationstationtoledo.org


The Soul of Seoul

Cornel Gabara and I arrived at Incheon Airport in S. Korea yesterday afternoon after a fourteen hour flight. To give you some background: We have been invited to spend six weeks directing an MFA Master’s Thesis production of Shakespeare’s “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” (in Korean!) at Kookmin University.

We opted to take the subway into Seoul (a cheaper and more interesting way to observe local culture). Among my first observations: Infrastructure!
In addition to being beautiful and cosmopolitan, Incheon Airport is extremely practical, clean and everything works! They have some great touches, such as bathroom stalls equipped with special high chairs to hold your toddler still–something I appreciated deeply, since we had our jet-lagged eight and two-year olds in tow.

The subway system is very new, clean and air conditioned. The edge is completely enclosed with a glass wall and glass doors, making falling onto the track virtually impossible. I have lived in New York and Paris and these trains put both their subways, which I always admired, to shame! Granted, those systems are much older, having pioneered service around the turn of the twentieth century. South Korea built its first line in 1974. In fact, South Korea, began really modernizing itself in the 1960’s and has completely transformed its economy and infrastructure at breakneck speed. It has become a world class economy and a democracy. Some estimates put its per capita income on par with that of the European Union.

We are staying in a skyrise in the Insadong district, a vibrant, artistic center at the heart of the city of Seoul. This sprawling metropolis boasts a population of eleven million in the city proper, and as many as twenty five million, if you include all the suburbs.

Insadong is full of streets and alleys plastered with all manner of cafes, restaurants, and everything in between. This is clearly a gastronomical city and in addition to traditional fare, there are international restaurants and American food chains all around. Shops containing fashionable clothing, art supplies, musical instruments and art galleries fill the spaces in between and skyscrapers tower over our heads. I wish I could tell you more about the city, but unfortunately we have had little chance to explore thus far.

In the evening, I gazed out at the alternating skylines and bright lights which were reminiscent of Times Square. We went to bed very early, but got little sleep. I don’t suffer from jetlag, but our sleepless daughters kept us all awake. As they tossed and turned, my attention was caught by a lonely police siren which wailed momentarily and then stopped, almost shyly. It made me aware of the silence.
I continued to listen…
No cars honking, no sirens, no shouts, no music.
None of the familiar big city sounds that I have become accustomed to in my travels…
This was a Thursday night, in the heart of downtown–and I know Koreans like to party–yet unlike any other large city I have been in, there was no sound to be heard.
A curious observation, perhaps indicative of the combination of hard work, discipline and passion that it has taken to build up this country almost overnight–or perhaps not.
It is after all, Friday today.
I guess we will find out tonight!