Judith Herb College of Education

Archive for September, 2018

UT Alumna Ms. Al-Hayani Named Ohio Teacher of the Year

For Immediate Release
Sept. 26, 2018

Toledo Public Schools’ Mona Al-Hayani Named
2019 Ohio Teacher of the Year

Her passion to nurture and expand the minds and hearts of students helped Mona Al-Hayani become a standout teacher at Toledo Early College High School — and now, she’s earned the title of Ohio’s 2019 Teacher of the Year. In an assembly today, State Superintendent Paolo DeMaria announced the award and surprised Toledo Early College High School students and staff.

“Mona challenges, prepares and empowers her students to become engaged and active members of society — and our cities, our state and our nation are better for it,” said Superintendent DeMaria. “I love the Ohio Teacher of the Year program because it recognizes exceptional teachers like Mona and emphasizes that Ohio is lucky to have so many talented individuals who work hard each day to support our students in their acquisition of knowledge and skills.”

Known by her students as “Ms. Al,” Al-Hayani not only teaches history, but she also advises the National Honor Society and Young Women for Change, a student-led group at her school. A two-time U.S. Department of Education Fulbright-Hays awardee, Al-Hayani traveled around the globe as a teacher leader and researcher.

As the daughter of parents from Iraq and Lebanon, Al-Hayani believes that being an active participant in the democratic process is a responsibility; one that ensures equal rights and an informed citizenry.

Dr. Romules Durant, Superintendent for Toledo Public  Schools respects the work that Ms. Al-Hayani has done to educate teachers about human trafficking. “Her training focuses on teaching school practitioners about human trafficking, while the curriculum focuses on the risk factors and teaches youth about human trafficking awareness, social media safety and positive body and mental image,” Durant explained. “Ms. Al-Hayani has trained more than 10,000 individuals on this important topic – a topic that is very relevant in today’s world. She is to be commended for her dedication,” Durant said.

In August, Al-Hayani received the State Board District 2 Teacher of the Year award. She will represent Ohio in the 2019 National Teacher of the Year selection sponsored by the Council of Chief State School Officers.

A native of Toledo, she earned a bachelor’s degree in sociology and a master’s degree in secondary education (and teaching license) from the University of Toledo. She also earned her National Board for Professional Teaching Standards certification.

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Editor’s Note: A photo of Al-Hayani can be downloaded here. More information about the Ohio Teacher of the Year program can be found by clicking here.

About the Ohio Department of Education
The Ohio Department of Education oversees the state’s public education system, which includes public school districts, joint vocational school districts and charter schools. The Department also monitors educational service centers, other regional education providers, early learning and child care programs, and private schools. The Department’s tasks include administering the school funding system, collecting school fiscal and performance data, developing academic standards and model curricula, administering the state achievement tests, issuing district and school report cards, administering Ohio’s voucher programs, providing professional development, and licensing teachers, administrators, treasurers, superintendents and other education personnel. The Department is governed by the State Board of Education with administration of the Department the responsibility of the superintendent of public instruction.

Media Contact:
Brittany Halpin
(614) 728-5959

Click here for a web version.


JHCOE TO DEDICATE NEW RESEARCH CENTER

The Judith Herb College of Education will dedicate a new center Thursday, Oct. 4.

The mission of the Herb Innovation Center is to evaluate and inspire peer-reviewed research in the college to improve and advance education and endow a great society.

UT alumna and benefactor Judith Herb will be at the ceremony.

“We are excited to unveil this new center that will empower faculty and students to conduct research with the ultimate goal of improving learning,” said Dr. Raymond Witte, dean of the Judith Herb College of Education. “We are grateful to Judith Herb for her generosity and dedication to her alma mater, and for her belief in the power of education.”

In 2006, Judith and Marvin Herb, and their sons, Thomas and Jon, contributed $15 million to fund numerous scholarships as well as educational assessment support and research initiatives in the College of Education. The Herbs designated $8 million of the gift for the Herb Scholars Fund, with another $4.25 million going to support the Herb Research Initiatives Fund, which bonded together researchers with a common interest in learning. The remaining $2.75 million funded the creation of a faculty development and electronic assessment support system fund. Additionally, to recognize the single largest donation in school history, the college was renamed in honor of Judith Herb.

The ceremony will be held at 4 p.m. in Gillham Hall third floor lobby. A short ceremony is scheduled for 4:15 p.m. with an open house to follow.

RSVPs are requested by Friday, Sept. 28; go to utoledo.edu/education/dedication.

By UT News Staff

Are You Student Ready? Crisis Training to Assist Students

Kovach

Dr. Lisa Pescara-Kovach, Associate Professor of Educational Psychology will be one of the presenters at this forum to help faculty and graduate students in teaching positions assess at-risk students and review sexual assault resources.

For more information and to RSVP, click the link below:
http://www.utoledo.edu/offices/provost/future-of-higher-education-forum/

 

 


UT PEACE EDUCATION SCHOLAR WINS FULBRIGHT GRANT TO COLOMBIA

UT PEACE EDUCATION SCHOLAR WINS FULBRIGHT GRANT TO COLOMBIA

By Christine Billau : Tuesday, September 4th, 2018

A peace education scholar at The University of Toledo is heading to Latin America to support the society-wide effort to realize a 2016 peace deal that ended a 52-year civil war in Colombia between the government and the Armed Revolutionary Forces of Colombia, or FARC, among other militants.

Dr. Dale Snauwaert, professor of educational theory and peace studies in the UT Department of Educational Foundations and Leadership, was awarded a Fulbright Specialist Award and is spending Sept. 4-18 at the Institute for Bioethics at the Pontifica Universidad Javeriana in Bogota to study and give lectures and workshops on moral theory, environmental ethics and peace education.

“It will take a generation or two to socially, economically and politically integrate generations of ex-militants into Colombian society,” Snauwaert said. “One of the keys to the success of the peace process, therefore, is peace education.”

The lectures and discussion forums are open to the public, including faculty and students at Pontifica Universidad Javeriana and government officials.

“At this critical stage in the Colombian peace process, an understanding of the philosophy and practice of justice and peace building among the citizenry is essential for its success,” Snauwaert said. “The project will open the institution to an ongoing dialogue regarding peace and justice as well as the recognition of the inclusion of peace and justice studies as a civic responsibility of the university.”

“This is an outstanding award, and Dale is certainly worthy of it. His work in peace education is well-known and respected,” Dr. Raymond Witte, dean of the UT Judith Herb College of Education, said. “A Fulbright recognition is at the highest level, and this speaks directly to the quality of Dale’s work as well as the support from the Judith Herb College of Education and the University at large.”

Peace studies is an interdisciplinary field of study and a learning process designed to develop the capacity of democratic citizens to critically understand and transform all forms of violence and the patterns of thought that justify them, and to envision and pursue a just and peaceful world.

“The primary elements of peace studies focus on the causes that give rise to and sustain violence, approaches to resolving violent conflict, and the articulation and defense of ethical and political principles and values that define the normative conditions of peace, including theories of justice, both ideal and non-ideal,” Snauwaert said.

UT offers an undergraduate minor in peace and justice studies and oversees the Betty A. Reardon Archives, which is housed in the University’s Canaday Center for Special Collections. The collection consists of Reardon’s extensive publications, unpublished manuscripts, curriculum, reports, scholarly presentations, and correspondence from the 1960s to the present about peace studies. The archives of the world-renowned champion of peace education and 2013 nominee for the Nobel Peace Prize have been in the Canaday Center since 2009.