Global & Disaster Medicine

Archive for the ‘Animals/Pets’ Category

Pet Disaster Preparedness Kit

CDC

Prepare a disaster kit for your pet(s) with these items. Ask your veterinarian for help putting it together.

Documents

  • Photocopied veterinary records
    • Rabies certificate
    • Vaccinations
    • Medical summary
    • Prescriptions for medications
    • Most recent heartworm test result (dogs)
    • Most recent FeLV/FIV test result (cats)
  • Photocopied registration information (ex: proof of ownership or adoption records)
  • Pet description(s) (ex: breed, sex, color, weight)
  • Recent photographs of each of your pets
  • Waterproof container for documents
  • Microchip information (ex: microchip number, name and number of the microchip company)
  • Your contact information (phone numbers and addresses for your family and friends or relatives you may be staying with)
  • Pet boarding instructions Cdc-pdf[PDF – 2 pages]

Water, Food, Medications

  • 2-week supply of food for each animal stored in waterproof containers
  • 2-week supply of water for each animal
  • Non-spill food and water dishes
  • Manual can opener
  • Feeding instructions for each animal
  • 2-week supply of any medications (if applicable)
  • Medication instructions (if applicable)
  • 1-month supply of flea, tick, and heartworm preventative

Other Supplies

  • Leash, collar with ID, and harness
  • Litter and litterbox (cats)
  • Toys
  • Appropriate-sized pet carrier with bedding, blanket, or towel
  • Pet first aid book and first aid kit
  • Cleaning supplies for accidents (paper towels, plastic bags, disinfectant)
Resources

Pet Project: 5 Ways to Prep Your Pet for Emergencies

CDC

 

Posted on June 24, 2019 by Casey Barton Behravesh, MS, DVM, DrPH, DACVPM, Director, One Health Office, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases

Your pet is family. Their safety and wellbeing is a priority for you every day, but have you thought about what you would do with your pet in an emergency?

Many people don’t think about being prepared until an emergency is at their doorstep. When disaster strikes, they may choose to ignore evacuation orders because they don’t know what to do with their pets. Try to imagine having to make the decision to leave your pet behind during a flood, fire, hurricane, or other emergency—this was a reality for many pet owners during recent emergencies including hurricanes Florence and Michael, the California wildfires, and the eruption of Hawaii’s Kīlauea volcano in 2018.

Although you can never completely control what will happen during an emergency, you can take steps to be as prepared as possible for advance-notice disasters, like hurricanes, and no-notice emergencies, like house fires. By taking some easy actions now, you can avoid having to make difficult and dangerous decisions during an emergency.

  1. Get your pet microchipped. It is relatively inexpensive to have a veterinarian implant a microchip that contains the owner’s contact information. Owners can be located if a shelter or veterinary clinic scans the chip. Finding a lost pet that hasn’t be microchipped can be extremely difficult and many times impossible. If your pet is already microchipped, make sure the registration info is up-to-date so you can be contacted if your pet is found.
  1. Prepare a disaster kit for your pet ahead of time, along with your family’s personal needs. Include everything your pet will need, from food and prescriptions to leashes and bedding. Although this may mean purchasing twice as much stuff, it will be faster and easier to gather your pet’s items if you have them all together and ready for an emergency.

Collect and protect your pet’s veterinary records, rabies vaccination certificates, microchip information, and any prescriptions. Make sure items are stored with your important paperwork in waterproof containers. And don’t forget the most basic, but important, information—your contact information and a photo of your pet; preferably one of you with your pet as further proof of ownership.

Visit CDC’s Healthy Pets, Healthy People website for a detailed checklist of items to include in your pet’s emergency kit.

  1. Plan where your pet will stay in case you need to evacuate. Pets are often not allowed in evacuation centers unless they are service animals. You can ask out-of-town friends or relatives about keeping your pet in an emergency ahead of time, or you can check a website that lists pet-friendly hotels (com or tripswithpets.com) so you have some locations ready to book.Locate veterinary clinics and boarding facilities in areas where you plan to evacuate just in case you need to temporarily house your pet. You can also contact your local emergency management office to ask if they offer accommodations for owners and pets during a disaster.
    1. Use a buddy system with friends, family, and neighbors in case you’re not home during an emergency. Have a trusted person you can call to check on pets and evacuate them if necessary. Having a kit ready to go will make it easier for them if you aren’t there.
    1. Practice evacuating or sheltering in place with your pet. This will help familiarize your pet with the process so when the time comes, it won’t be scary for them. Training pets to be in their carriers can make them more comfortable and reduce the stress of getting everyone out safely. Know exactly how and where you will place your pet’s carrier and supplies in a vehicle.

    For sheltering in place, pick a room with few or no windows, no toxic chemicals or plants, and make sure to close off small areas where frightened pets could get stuck. Include your pet in your family’s plan—everyone should know who will grab the pet(s), supplies, and where you will meet during an emergency.

    Learn more about preparing your pet for emergencies on CDC’s Healthy Pets, Healthy People website.

Grey adult cat resting inside a pet carrier.


CDC: A multistate outbreak of Salmonella infections linked to contact with pet hedgehogs.

CDC

Photo of a hedgehog.

At A Glance

Map of United States - People infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella, by state of residence, as of May 30, 2019

“……

  • Since the last update on March 29, 2019, illnesses in an additional 10 people and six states have been added to this investigation.
  • Twenty-seven people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Typhimurium have been reported from 17 states.
    • Two people were hospitalized. No deaths have been reported.
    • Forty-two percent are children aged 12 or younger.
  • Epidemiologic and laboratory evidence indicate that contact with pet hedgehogs is the likely source of this outbreak.
    • In interviews, 18 (90%) of 20 ill people reported contact with a hedgehog.
    • A common source of hedgehogs has not been identified.
  • The outbreak strain making people sick was identified in samples collected from 10 hedgehogs in Minnesota, including 5 hedgehogs from the homes of five ill patients……”

Epidemiologic, laboratory, and traceback evidence indicates that puppies sold through the commercial dog industry, an uncommon source of Campylobacter outbreaks, were the source of a multistate outbreak of multidrug-resistant Campylobacter infections.

CDC

“….The outbreak, which began in January 2016, affected a total of 118 people in 18 states through Feb 4, including 29 pet store employees, with 26 hospitalizations and no deaths reported….”

 


North Carolina & Florence: Millions of chickens and thousands of pigs died

CNN

Flood Statement
National Weather Service Raleigh, NC
945 PM EDT Wed Sep 19 2018

…The Flood Warning continues for the following rivers in North
Carolina…

Little River At Manchester affecting Cumberland County

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS…

Safety message. If you encounter deep water while driving, do not
attempt to drive through. Turn around, dont drown.

&&

NCC051-201344-
/O.EXT.KRAH.FL.W.0011.000000T0000Z-180924T1648Z/
/MANN7.3.ER.180915T1619Z.180917T2200Z.180924T0448Z.NR/
945 PM EDT Wed Sep 19 2018

The Flood Warning continues for
the Little River At Manchester.
* At  9:30 PM Wednesday the stage was 28.0 feet.
* Flood stage is 18.0 feet.
* Major flooding is occurring and Major flooding is forecast.
* Forecast…The river will continue to fall to below flood stage by
early Monday morning.
* Impact…At 30.0 feet, Water reaches the base of the Bragg Blvd (Hwy
24/87) bridge across the Little River.
* Impact…At 28.0 feet, Flooding reaches the road surface of the
Manchester Road bridge.
* Impact…At 27.0 feet, Major flood stage. The Starlite motel is
flooded and Manchester Road is closed.
* Impact…At 25.0 feet, Water reaches the base of the Manchester Road
bridge and the foundation of the Starlite motel at the intersection
of Manchester Road and Bragg Blvd (Hwy 24/87).
* Impact…At 24.0 feet, Moderate flood stage. Manchester Road is
flooded.
* Impact…At 23.0 feet, Minor flooding begins on Manchester Road near
the Fort Bragg water treatment plant.
* Impact…At 18.0 feet, Flood stage. Minor flood problems begin in
Fort Bragg near the water treatment plant.

 


USDA: Safeguarding Food, Pets, Livestock before Hurricane Florence

USDA

USDA Urges Local Residents to Safeguard Food, Pets, Livestock before Hurricane Florence

You are subscribed to USDA Office of Communications.

Release No. 0182.18

Contact: USDA Press
Email: press@oc.usda.gov

USDA Urges Local Residents to Safeguard Food, Pets, Livestock before Hurricane Florence

WASHINGTON, Sept. 12, 2018 – The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) reminds rural communities, farmers and ranchers, families and small businesses in the path of Hurricane Florence that USDA has programs that provide assistance in the wake of disasters. USDA staff in the regional, state and county offices that stand ready and eager to help.

“If we know anything about American farmers, it’s that they can handle adversity. Even so, USDA is ready to help with the resources they need to be able to weather storms and recover from damages,” U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue said. “As hurricanes approach, we have USDA personnel in counties throughout the nation, standing by to assist in any way possible.”

Hurricane Florence currently is forecast to make landfall Saturday morning near the border between North Carolina and South Carolina, and then travel westward through South Carolina.

At the same time, Tropical Storm Isaac’s path may include Puerto Rico and the American Virgin Islands by Saturday morning. In the Pacific, Tropical Storm Olivia is forecast to move over the Hawaiian Islands late Tuesday into Wednesday, and Super Typhoon Mangkhut is moving away from Guam.

USDA encourages those in the path of the storms to take precautions to protect the safety of their food and animals.

Tips to best protect food safety before losing power:

  • Keep appliance thermometers in both the refrigerator and the freezer to ensure temperatures remain food safe during a power outage. Safe temperatures are 40°F or lower in the refrigerator, 0°F or lower in the freezer.
  • Freeze water in small plastic storage bags or containers prior to a storm. These containers are small enough to fit around the food in the refrigerator and freezer to help keep food cold.
  • Freeze refrigerated items, such as leftovers, milk and fresh meat and poultry that you may not need immediately—this helps keep them at a safe temperature longer.
  • Consider getting 50 pounds of dry or block ice if a lengthy power outage is possible. This amount of ice should keep a fully-stocked 18-cubic-feet freezer cold for two days.
  • Group foods together in the freezer—this ‘igloo’ effect helps the food stay cold longer.
  • Keep a few days’ worth of ready-to-eat foods that do not require cooking or cooling.

USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) is urging everyone in the potential path of the hurricane to prepare now – not just for yourselves, but also for your pets and your livestock.

Protecting livestock during a disaster:

  • Plan For Evacuation – Know how you will evacuate and where you will go.  If it is not feasible to evacuate your livestock, be sure to provide adequate food and water that will last them until you can return, and a strong shelter.
  • If you are planning to move livestock out of state, make sure to contact the State Veterinarian’s Office in the receiving state before you move any animals. You also may contact APHIS Veterinary Services state offices for information and assistance about protecting and moving livestock.
  • Listen to Emergency Officials – Evacuate if asked to do so.

When major disasters strike, USDA has an emergency loan program that provides eligible farmers low-interest loans to help them recover from production and physical losses. USDA’s emergency loan program is triggered when a natural disaster is designated by the Secretary of Agriculture or a natural disaster or emergency is declared by the President under the Stafford Act. USDA also offers additional programs tailored to the needs of specific agricultural sectors to help producers weather the financial impacts of major disasters and rebuild their operations.

Helping producers weather financial impacts of disasters:

Livestock owners and contract growers who experience above normal livestock deaths due to specific weather events, as well as to disease or animal attacks, may qualify for assistance under USDA’s Livestock Indemnity Program.

Livestock, honeybee and farm-raised fish producers who suffer animal, feed, grazing and associated transportation cost losses due to an extreme weather event may qualify for assistance through USDA’s emergency assistance program tailored for their agricultural sectors. Producers who suffer losses to or are preventing from planting agricultural commodities not covered by federal crop insurance may be eligible for assistance under USDA’s Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Programs if the losses were due to natural disasters.

Helping operations recover after disasters:

USDA also can provide financial resources through its Environmental Quality Incentives Program to help with immediate needs and long-term support to help recover from natural disasters and conserve water resources.

Farmers and ranchers needing to rehabilitate farmland damaged by natural disasters can apply for assistance through USDA’s Emergency Conservation Program. USDA also has assistance available for eligible private forest landowners who need to restore forestland damaged by natural disasters through the Emergency Forest Restoration Program. USDA’s Emergency Watershed Protection Program also can help relieve imminent threats to life and property caused by flood, fires and other natural disasters that impair a watershed.

Orchardists and nursery tree growers may be eligible for assistance through USDA’s Tree Assistance Program to help replant or rehabilitate eligible trees, bushes, and vines damaged by natural disasters.

Producers with coverage through the Risk Management Agency (RMA) administered Federal crop insurance program should contact their crop insurance agent for issues regarding filing claims. Those who purchased crop insurance will be paid for covered losses. Producers should report crop damage within 72 hours of damage discovery and follow up in writing within 15 days. The Approved Insurance Providers (AIP), loss adjusters and agents are experienced and well trained in handling these types of events. As part of its commitment to delivering excellent customer service, RMA is working closely with AIPs that sell and service crop insurance policies to ensure enough loss adjusters will be available to process claims in the affected areas as quickly as possible. Please visit the RMA website – www.rma.usda.gov for more details.


UN: The Korean peninsular and Southeast Asia may be next to report outbreaks of African swine fever after the rapid onset of the deadly pig disease in China

Bloomberg

 


A United States-FAO partnership working to strengthen the capacity of developing countries to manage outbreaks of diseases in farm animals has in just 12 months succeeded in training over 4,700 veterinary health professionals in 25 countries in Africa, Asia and the Middle East.

FAO

March 2018, Rome – A United States-FAO partnership working to strengthen the capacity of developing countries to manage outbreaks of diseases in farm animals has in just 12 months succeeded in training over 4,700 veterinary health professionals in 25 countries in Africa, Asia and the Middle East.

The FAO-provided technical trainings covered a gamut of key competencies, including disease surveillance and forecasting, laboratory operations, biosafety and biosecurity, prevention and control methods and outbreak response strategies.

All told, 3,266 vets in Asia, 619 in West Africa, 459 in East Africa, and 363 in the Middle East benefitted. They are on the front line of the effort to stop new diseases at their source. (Full list below)

“Over the course of this relationship we’ve learned that there are many mutually beneficial areas of interest between the food and agricultural community and the human health community,” said Dennis Carroll, Director of USAID’s Global Health Security and Development Unit.

“A partnership with FAO not only enables us to protect human populations from future viral threats, but also to protect animal populations from viruses that could decimate food supplies. It’s not just a global health, infectious disease issue, but also a food security, food safety, and economic growth issue,” Carroll added.

“Some 75 percent of new infectious diseases that have emerged in recent decades originated in animals before jumping to us Homo sapiens, a terrestrial mammal. This is why improving adequately discovering and tackling animal disease threats at source represents a strategic high-ground in pre-empting future pandemics,” said Juan Lubroth, FAO Chief Veterinary Officer

“A proactive approach is absolutely critical, and for that, the world needs well-trained, up-to-speed professionals — biologists, ecologists, microbiologists, modellers, physicians and veterinarians — which is why the United States’ consistent support for building up that kind of capacity has been invaluable,” Lubroth said.

Viral risks

Population growth, agricultural expansion and environmental encroachment, and the rise of inter-continental food supply chains in recent decades have dramatically altered how diseases emerge, jump species boundaries, and spread, FAO studies have shown.

A new study just published by USAID’s Dennis Carroll and experts from several institutions including FAO suggests that just  0.01 percent of the viruses behind zoonotic disease outbreaks are known to science.  The authors have proposed an international partnership, The Global Virome Project, aimed at characterizing the most risky of these. Doing so would allow more proactive responses to disease threats, with benefits not only for public health but also for the livelihoods of poor, livestock-depending farming communities.

Partnering for global health security

The close FAO-USAID partnership on animal health goes back over a decade.

Experts from the two organizations are meeting in Rome this week to review progress achieved in the past year and how to respond to threats like species-jumping zoonotic illnesses and the growing trends of antimicrobial resistance and options for intervention measures in food production and protection of public health.

In addition to trainings, via the USAID- Emerging Pandemic Threats (EPT) programme, FAO conducts research and advises on policy in order to help countries increase their resilience to disease emergence and protect animal and human health.

And to enable rapid responses by governments to disease events FAO has leveraged USAID support to work with the United Nations Humanitarian Response Depots to establish a series of emergency equipment and gear stockpiles in 15 countries that facilitate rapid and adequate responses to outbreaks.

FAO is also key player and advisor to the Global Health Security Agenda (GHSA), a growing partnership of over 60 countries, NGOs and international organizations working to improve early detection of and responses to infectious disease threats. USAID support under the GHSA umbrella is helping FAO engage with 17 countries in Africa and Asia to strengthen capabilities to detect and respond to zoonotic diseases.

Thanks to USAID support for the EPT and GSHA, FAO is actively tackling disease issues and building national capacities in over 30 countries

Economic impacts as well as health consequences

Beyond the risks posed to human health, animal diseases can cost billions of dollars and hamstringing economic growth.

The most damaging outbreaks of high impact disease in recent decades all had an animal source, including H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza, H1N1 pandemic influenza, Ebola, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS).

For example, the H5N1 outbreak of the mid-2000s caused an estimated $30 billion in economic losses, globally; a few years later, H1N1 racked up as much as $55 billion in damages.

Not to mention that for millions of the world’s poorest people, animals are their primary capital assets — “equity on four legs”. Losing them can push these families out of self-reliance and into destitution.

Note to editors.  The countries where the trainings took place were: Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Cameroon, China, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Egypt, Ghana, Guinea, Indonesia, Jordan, Kenya, Laos People’s Democratic Republic , Liberia, Mali, Myanmar, Nepal, Senegal, Sierra Leone, United Republic of Tanzania, Uganda and Viet Nam.


Multistate Outbreak of Salmonella Agbeni Infections Linked to Pet Turtles, 2017

CDC

People infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Agbeni, by state of residence, as of November 2, 2017


Multistate Outbreak of Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella Heidelberg Infections Linked to Contact with Dairy Calves

CDC

Since the last update on August 2, 2017, eight more ill people have been reported from six states.

People infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Heidelberg, by state of residence, as of October 30, 2017

  • CDC, several states, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (USDA-APHIS) are investigating a multistate outbreak of multidrug-resistant Salmonella Heidelberg infections.
  • A total of 54 people infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella Heidelberg have been reported from 15 states.
    • Seventeen (35%) people have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported.
    • Illnesses started on dates ranging from January 27, 2015 to October 15, 2017.
    • Eighteen (33%) people in this outbreak are children under the age of 5.
  • Epidemiologic and laboratory investigations linked ill people in this outbreak to contact with calves, including dairy calves.
    • In interviews, ill people answered questions about contact with animals and foods eaten in the week before becoming ill. Of the 54 people interviewed, 34 (63%) reported contact with dairy calves or other cattle. Some of the ill people interviewed reported that they became sick after their dairy calves became sick or died.
    • Ongoing surveillance in veterinary diagnostic laboratories showed that calves in several states continue to get sick with the outbreak strains of multidrug resistant Salmonella Heidelberg. ‎
    • Information collected earlier in the outbreak indicated that most of the calves came from Wisconsin. Regulatory officials in several states are now tracing the origin of the calves that are linked to the newer illnesses.
  • Antibiotic resistance testing(https://www.cdc.gov/narms/resources/glossary.html) conducted by CDC on clinical isolates from ill people shows that the isolates were resistant to multiple types of antibiotics.
    • Antibiotic resistance may be associated with increased risk of hospitalization, development of a bloodstream infection, or treatment failure in patients.
    • Whole genome sequencing has identified multiple antimicrobial resistance genes in outbreak-associated isolates from 43 ill people, 87 isolates from cattle, and 11 isolates from animal environments.
    • These findings match results from standard antibiotic resistance testing(https://www.cdc.gov/narms/resources/glossary.html) methods used by CDC’s National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS)(https://www.cdc.gov/narms/index.html) laboratory on clinical isolates from eight ill people in this outbreak.
    • All eight isolates from ill people were resistant to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, ampicillin, cefoxitin, ceftriaxone, streptomycin, sulfisoxazole, and tetracycline, and had reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin. Seven isolates were also resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Five were also resistant to nalidixic acid. Three were also resistant to chloramphenicol. All eight isolates tested were susceptible to azithromycin and meropenem.
  • Follow these steps to prevent illness when working with any livestock:
    • Always wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water right after touching livestock, equipment, or anything in the area where animals live and roam. Use dedicated clothes, shoes, and work gloves when working with livestock. Keep and store these items outside of your home.
    • It is especially important to follow these steps if there are children under age 5 in your household. Young children are more likely to get a Salmonella infection because their immune systems are still developing.
    • Work with your veterinarian to keep your animals healthy and prevent diseases.
  • This investigation is ongoing and we will provide updates as more information becomes available. Livestock owners should continue to watch for increased sicknesses in dairy calves and consult their veterinarian if needed.

 


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