Global & Disaster Medicine

Archive for the ‘CDC’ Category

CDC: Hurricane education


CDC: Preventing waterborne outbreaks in refugee camps

CDC

Hundreds of thousands of ethnic Rohingyas crossed the border into Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh to escape violence in Rakhine State in Myanmar. More than 900,000 forcibly displaced Myanmar nationals live in refugee camps in Bangladesh. Because conditions are crowded and the area is prone to flooding, the risk of Acute Watery Diarrhea (AWD) and other waterborne disease outbreaks had to be reduced during the 2018 monsoon season. Humanitarian partners distributed household water treatment products throughout the camps and combined this with messages to promote good hygiene. However, a recent water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) survey estimated that only 13% of households treat household water. Of the 182 households that reported to treat water using chlorine tablets, only 53 (21%) had detectable chlorine in their stored water, an indicator of whether water was treated and was protected from recontamination during storage in households. Bucket chlorination, where an attendant sitting by the well directly chlorinates each bucket of water as it is collected was also implemented, but only at a small number of wells. Because of low levels of household water treatment in the camps, the water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) team recommended to scale-up bucket chlorination to ensure households were using chlorinated water during the monsoon season.

World Water Day 2019 - Flood

The WASH team within CDC’s Emergency Response and Recovery Branch (ERRB) worked with UNICEF and non-governmental partners to increase bucket chlorination from June to September 2018. In July, ERRB WASH specialists measured chlorine levels in one camp to provide a snapshot of current levels of chlorine in the water. After this, the WASH team started a program to monitor bucket chlorination, using mobile phone surveys to ensure chlorinators were present and that chlorine was in water in nearby households. In addition, they piloted guidelines to help identify which drinking water wells should receive bucket chlorination first. Finally, the WASH team provided guidance to implementing partners on how to scale-up and improve bucket chlorination based on assessment and monitoring results.
In addition, CDC supported the WASH Sector in Cox’s Bazar and UNICEF by training local staff on how to conduct water quality testing and drafting guidance on water quality monitoring, including a system to monitor E. coli levels in wells through the dry and monsoon seasons.
The Rohingya face extremely challenging circumstances as they seek refuge in makeshift camps. The 2019 UN World Water Day theme is “leaving no one behind” and CDC seeks to assist partners in providing safe, treated drinking water to the world’s most vulnerable communities.


CDC: On earthquakes


CDC and its fight against EBV in Rwanda

PROTECTING RWANDA’S BORDER AGAINST EBOLA


CDC video on Candida auris-2019

 

Candida auris (C. auris) is an emerging fungus that presents a serious global health threat. CDC is concerned about C. auris for 3 main reasons:

  1. It is often multidrug-resistant, meaning multiple antifungal drugs are less or not at all effective in treating C. auris.
  2. It is difficult to identify with standard laboratory methods, and it can be misidentified in labs without specific technology. Misidentification may lead to inappropriate management.
  3. It has caused outbreaks in healthcare settings. It is important to quickly identify C. auris in a hospitalized patient so that healthcare facilities can take special precautions to stop its spread.

Most C. auris cases in the United States have been detected in the New York City area, New Jersey, and the Chicago area. Clusters of cases have also recently been described in Florida, Texas, and California. C. auris cases in the United States are originally a result of inadvertent introduction into the United States from a patient who had received healthcare in a country where C. auris has been reported.  Most cases now are a result of local spread after such an introduction.


CDC: Personal provisions, supplies, and equipment necessary to protect the health and safety of your family in an emergency.

CDC

The Basics

  • Water
    • Store at least 1 gallon of water per day for each person and each pet. You should consider storing more water than this for hot climates, for pregnant women, and for persons who are sick.
    • Store at least a 3-day supply of water for each person and each pet. Try to store a 2-week supply, if possible.
    • Observe the expiration date for store-bought water. Replace non-store bought water every 6 months.
    • Store a bottle of unscented liquid household chlorine bleach (label should say it contains between 5-6% and 8.25% of sodium hypochlorite) to disinfect your water, if necessary, and to use for general cleaning and sanitizing.
  • Nonperishable and ready-to-eat food, including special foods—such as nutrition drinks and ready-to-feed formula—for infants, people with dietary restrictions, food sensitivities and allergies, and medical conditions such as diabetes.
  • Prescription eyeglasses, contact lenses, and contact lens solution.
  • Assistive technologies, such as hearing aids and picture boards.
  • Medical alert identification bracelet or necklace
  • Health protection supplies, including insect repellentExternal, water purification tablets, and sunscreen.
  • A change of clothes
  • Medical equipment including:
    • Canes, crutches, walkers, and wheelchairs
    • Nebulizers
    • Oxygen equipment
    • Blood sugar monitors
  • Medical supplies, including:
    • Antibacterial wipes
    • Catheters
    • Syringes
    • Nasal cannulas
    • Blood test strips
  • First aid supplies, including:
  • Sanitation and hygiene items, including:
    • Soap
    • Hand sanitizer
    • Sanitizing wipes
    • Garbage bags and plastic ties
    • Toilet paper
    • Feminine hygiene supplies
  • Pet supplies
  • Childcare supplies
  • Baby supplies

 


CDC: How to prepare for and respond to a smallpox emergency with smallpox vaccination how-to videos.

 


Where will the US public go for antivirals in a pandemic?

Public Views on Alternative Methods for Antiviral Distribution and Dispensing During an Influenza Pandemic
Gillian K. SteelFisher, Hannah Caporello, Anita Patel, Lisa M. Koonin, Ericka McGowan, Eran Ben-Porath, and Robert J. Blendon
Published Online: https://doi.org/10.1089/hs.2018.0073
“…..The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in coordination with state health departments, has plans to distribute antiviral drugs from federal stockpiles in the case of a pandemic. These plans are currently under review and include evaluation of the benefits of pharmaceutical supply chain distribution and dispensing of antivirals through community pharmacies. ……
Overall, there was widespread support for the proposed system, and a majority predicted they would be likely to get antivirals in pharmacies compared to public health clinics. However, preference for using pharmacies dropped substantially when even modest fees were introduced. Those without insurance were less likely to say they would get antivirals and, along with those in lower income groups, were more likely than others to use public health clinics at all cost points. Further, sizable proportions expressed concerns about side effects, a desire to wait until symptoms got worse, and hesitation about using drugs beyond the labeled expiration dates. …..”

CDC: Prepare Your Vehicle for Winter Weather

Drive safe this winter.

 Is Your Vehicle Winter Ready? - A bird character near the back of a vehicle with a water bottle, flash light, ice scraper, jumper cables, cell phone, shovel, first aid kit, and blankets.

Prepare for extremely cold weather every winter—it’s always a possibility. You can avoid many dangerous winter travel problems by planning ahead.

 Be Ready! Winter Weather Infographic

Take Action
  • Avoid dangerous winter travel problems by planning ahead.
  • Have maintenance service on your vehicle as recommended.
  • Check the antifreeze level.
  • Keep the gas tank near full to help avoid ice in the tank and fuel lines.

 Automobile in Icy and Snowy Conditions

There are steps you can take in advance for greater wintertime safety in your car.

Have maintenance service on your vehicle as often as the manufacturer recommends. In addition, every fall, do the following:

  • Have the radiator system serviced or check the antifreeze level yourself with an antifreeze tester. Add antifreeze as needed.
  • Replace windshield-wiper fluid with a wintertime mixture.
  • Replace any worn tires, make sure the tires have adequate tread, and check the air pressure in the tires.

During winter, keep the gas tank near full to help avoid ice in the tank and fuel lines.

Checklist

Keep your car fueled and in good working order. Be sure to check the following:

  • Antifreeze
  • Windshield wiper fluid (wintertime mixture)
  • Heater
  • Defroster
  • Brakes
  • Brake fluid
  • Ignition
  • Emergency flashers
  • Exhaust
  • Tires (air pressure and wear)
  • Fuel
  • Oil
  • Battery
  • Radiator

 


CDC: 6 Domains of Preparedness


Categories

Recent Posts

Archives

Admin