Global & Disaster Medicine

Archive for the ‘Food-borne diseases’ Category

Salmonella Kiambu Infections Linked to Yellow Maradol Papayas: 47 ill in 12 States & 1 Death

CDC

People infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Kiambu, by state of residence, as of July 21, 2017

What are the signs and symptoms of Salmonella infection?

Most people infected with Salmonella develop the following signs and symptoms 12-72 hours after being exposed to the bacteria:

  • Diarrhea
  • Fever
  • Abdominal cramps

How long does the illness last?

  • The illness usually lasts 4 to 7 days, and most people recover without treatment.
  • In some people, the diarrhea may be so severe that the patient needs to be hospitalized. Salmonella infection may spread from the intestines to the bloodstream and then to other places in the body.
  • In rare cases, Salmonella infection can cause death unless the person is treated promptly with antibiotics.

Who is more likely to have a severe illness?

  • Children younger than 5 years
  • Adults older than 65
  • People with weakened immune systems

More information about Salmonella and steps people can take to reduce their risk of infection with Salmonella in general can be found on the CDCSalmonella(https://www.cdc.gov/salmonella/general/index.html) website.

Advice to Consumers, Restaurants, and Retailers

Photo of a papaya cut open

Yellow Maradol Papaya: Maradol papayas are a large, oval fruit that weighs 3 or more pounds, with green skins that turn yellow when the fruit is ripe. The flesh inside the fruit is salmon-colored.

CDC recommends that consumers not eat, restaurants not serve, and retailers not sell yellow Maradol papayas until we learn more.

  • If you aren’t sure if the papaya you bought is a yellow Maradol papaya, you can ask the place of purchase. Restaurants and retailers can ask their supplier.
  • When in doubt, don’t eat, sell, or serve them and throw them out.
  • Wash and sanitize countertops as well as drawers or shelves in refrigerators where papayas were stored.

Contact a healthcare provider if you think you got sick from eating contaminated papaya.

  • Most people infected with Salmonella develop the following signs and symptoms 12-72 hours after being exposed to the bacteria:
    • Diarrhea
    • Fever
    • Abdominal cramps

 

 


Grilling safely: CDC

 

Get Ready to Grill Safely

important to keep meat, fish and poultry separated from other food in the grocery cart and shopping bags.keep meat, poultry, and seafood refrigerated until ready to grill wash hands with soap before and after handling raw meat, poultry, and seafood. Also, wash work surfaces, utensils, and the grill before and after cooking. Cook to correct temperature 145 for beef, pork, lamb, veal, fish. 160 F for hamburgers and other ground meat. 165 F for poultry throw out marinades and sauces that have touches raw meat juices, and put cooked meat on a clean plate.

Food poisoning peaks in the summer months when warmer temperatures cause foodborne germs to flourish. Follow these steps for a safe and enjoyable grilling season.

Separate

When shopping, pick up meat, poultry, and seafood last, right before checkout. Separate them from other food in your shopping cart and grocery bags. To guard against cross-contamination, put packages of raw meat and poultry into individual plastic bags.

Chill

Keep meat, poultry, and seafood refrigerated until ready to grill. When transporting, keep below 40°F in an insulated cooler.

Clean

Wash your hands with soap before and after handling raw meat, poultry, and seafood. Wash work surfaces, utensils, and the grill before and after cooking.

Check your grill and tools

Use a moist cloth or paper towel to clean the grill surface before cooking. If you use a wire bristle brush, thoroughly inspect the grill’s surface before cooking. Wire bristles from grill cleaning brushes may dislodge and stick into food on the grill.

Don’t cross-contaminate

Throw out marinades and sauces that have touched raw meat juices, which can spread germs to cooked foods. Use clean utensils and a clean plate to remove cooked meat from the grill.

Cook

Use a food thermometer to ensure meat is cooked hot enough to kill harmful germs. When smoking, keep temperatures inside the smoker at 225°F to 300°F to keep meat a safe temperature while it cooks.

  • 145°F – whole cuts of beef, pork, lamb, and veal (stand-time of 3 minutes at this temperature)
  • 145°F – fish
  • 160°F – hamburgers and other ground beef
  • 165°F – all poultry and pre-cooked meats, like hot dogs

Smoking:

After Grilling:

  • 140°F or warmer – until it’s served

Refrigerate

Divide leftovers into small portions and place in covered, shallow containers. Put in freezer or fridge within two hours of cooking (one hour if above 90°F outside).

Learn More:

 


People infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella, by state of residence, as of May 25, 2017 (n=372)

CDC

People infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella, by state of residence, as of May 25, 2017 (n=372)

Posted June 1, 2017 2:45PM ET

Outbreak Advisory

8
Outbreaks
372
Cases
47
States
71
Hospitalizations
  • CDC, many state departments of health and agriculture, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service are investigating eight multistate outbreaks of human Salmonella infections linked to contact with live poultry in backyard flocks.
    • These outbreaks are caused by several kinds of Salmonella bacteria: Salmonella Braenderup, Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Hadar, Salmonella I 4,[5],12:i-, Salmonella Indiana, Salmonella Infantis, Salmonella Mbandaka, and Salmonella Typhimurium.
  • As of May 25, 2017, 372 people infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella have been reported from 47 states.
    • Illnesses started on dates ranging from January 4, 2017 to May 13, 2017.
    • 71 ill people have been hospitalized, and no deaths have been reported.
    • 36% of ill people are children younger than 5 years.
  • Epidemiologic, traceback, and laboratory findings link the eight outbreaks to contact with live poultry, such as chicks and ducklings, which come from several hatcheries.
    • In interviews, 190 (83%) of 228 ill people reported contact with live poultry in the week before illness started.
    • People reported purchasing live baby poultry from several sources, including feed supply stores, websites, hatcheries, and from relatives.
  • Contact with live poultry and the areas where they live and roam can make people sick with Salmonella infections. Chicks, ducklings, and other live poultry that look healthy and clean can still carry Salmonella bacteria.
  • Outbreaks(https://www.cdc.gov/eid/article/22/10/15-0765_article) linked to contact with live poultry have increased in recent years as more people keep backyard flocks. In 2016(https://www.cdc.gov/salmonella/live-poultry-05-16/), a record number of illnesses were linked to contact with backyard poultry.

CDC: Unpasteurized milk, consumed by only 3.2% of the population, and cheese, consumed by only 1.6% of the population, caused 96% of illnesses caused by contaminated dairy products.

CDC

Costard S, Espejo L, Groenendaal H, Zagmutt FJ. Outbreak-related disease burden associated with consumption of unpasteurized cow’s milk and cheese, United States, 2009–2014. Emerg Infect Dis. 2017 Jun [date cited]. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2306.151603

DOI: 10.3201/eid2306.151603


A dodgy batch of smelly French cheese has been blamed for a 300-student mass food poisoning outbreak at schools in Normandy.

The Independent

“…..The children began to suffer headaches, vomiting and stomach aches after eating the cheese at 54 different primary schools and nurseries on 27 April…..”

 


Multistate Outbreak of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 Infections Linked to I.M. Healthy Brand SoyNut Butter

CDC

image of bowl of flour

At A Glance

  • Case Count: 29
  • States: 12
  • Deaths: 0
  • Hospitalizations: 12

Case Count Map: People infected with the outbreak strain of E. coli O157:H7, by state of residence, as of March 28, 2017


At least 435 students fell ill of suspected food poisoning in public schools across Egypt on Tuesday and Wednesday after consuming government-issued school meals.

CTV News

“…..Egypt’s Health Ministry announced on Wednesday that 312 students in schools in Cairo, Suez and Aswan were hospitalized with symptoms of food poisoning, in a succession of mass food poisoning incidents that started earlier this month caused by the school meals, produced by a military-owned company. Some 2,200 students were treated last week for the same symptoms in the southern province of Sohag.

The manager of Beni Suef’s central hospital, Mohamed el-Gebaly, told The Associated Press that 25 students from the province south of Cairo are in stable condition and being treated for vomiting and stomach pain……”

 


Egypt saw 4,650 suspected food poisoning cases in schools nationwide in March alone.

KDWN

“…..In a single incident last week in the southern city of Sohag, at least 3,353 students were affected. Similar outbreaks have taken place this week in other governorates, though on a much smaller scale, including in the canal city of Suez, Menoufiya in the Nile Delta and the southern city of Aswan…..Health Ministry official Amr Kandil said an investigation of school meals had detected no microbes linked to food poisoning…….”

 


Two people have died in a Danish outbreak of Salmonella that has infected at least 19 people.

Food Safety News

“….Several of the outbreak victims reported having eaten a commercial frozen, microwaveable dinner consisting of meatloaf, potatoes and sauce….”

 


More than 3,300 children were hospitalized in Egypt on Tuesday after an outbreak of food poisoning at several state-run primary schools

NY Times

“…..A total of 3,353 children became ill, and at least 50 ambulances were sent to the schools, state news media said. Since then, all but 17 of the students have recovered and been discharged. No deaths or serious complications were reported…..”

 


Categories

Recent Posts

Archives

Admin