Global & Disaster Medicine

Archive for the ‘Food-borne diseases’ Category

CDC: 92 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Infantis have been reported from 29 states after coming in contact with raw chicken products

CDC

Latest Outbreak Information

Illustration of a megaphone.

At A Glance

  • Ninety-two people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Infantis have been reported from 29 states.
    • Twenty-one people have been hospitalized, and no deaths have been reported.
  • Epidemiologic and laboratory evidence indicates that many types of raw chicken products from a variety of sources are contaminated with Salmonella Infantis and are making people sick.
    • In interviews, ill people report eating different types and brands of chicken products purchased from many different locations.
    • The outbreak strain has been identified in samples taken from raw chicken pet food, raw chicken products, and live chickens.
  • Antibiotic resistance testing conducted by CDC on Salmonella bacteria isolated from ill people shows that the outbreak strain is resistant to multiple antibiotics. Read the Advice to Clinicians.
  • A single, common supplier of raw chicken products or of live chickens has not been identified.
  • The outbreak strain of Salmonella Infantis is present in live chickens and in many types of raw chicken products, indicating it might be widespread in the chicken industry. CDC and USDA-FSIS have shared this information with representatives from the chicken industry and asked about steps that they may be taking to reduce Salmonella contamination.

Epi curve of people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella, by date of illness onset, as of October 15, 2018

Map of United States - People infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella, by state of residence, as of October 15, 2018


The Insect Allies program: A bioweapon?

DARPA

DARPA Enlists Insects to Protect Agricultural Food Supply

New program aims for insect delivery of protective genes to modify mature plants within a single growing season

outreach@darpa.mil
10/19/2016
PA Enlists Insects to Protect Agricultural Food Supply and Commodity Crops

It may not be obvious to humans, but the life of a plant is full of peril. Viruses, pests, fungi, herbicides, drought, pollution, salinity, flooding, and frost—the plants that we depend on for food, clean air, and materials are challenged by myriad threats, natural and man-made. By extension, human populations are put at risk when food security is challenged and the agricultural underpinnings of our economies are destabilized, especially when threats emerge rapidly or unexpectedly.

Farmers and others responsible for plant health use longstanding tools such as crop rotation, selective breeding, pesticides, slash-and-burn clearing, and quarantine to shelter plants and defend against the worst effects of pathogens, pests, and environmental insults, but these methods can be slow, inefficient, and damaging to the environment, and may require extensive and expensive infrastructure. And while scientists and farmers are increasingly turning to molecular techniques to improve resilience in plant varieties, today’s genomic tools generally do not allow for alteration of mature plants.

A new DARPA program is poised to provide an alternative to traditional agricultural threat response, using targeted gene therapy to protect mature plants within a single growing season. DARPA proposes to leverage a natural and very efficient two-step delivery system to transfer modified genes to plants: insect vectors and the plant viruses they transmit. In the process, DARPA aims to transform certain insect pests into “Insect Allies,” the name of the new effort.

“Insects eat plants and insects transmit the majority of plant viruses,” said Blake Bextine, the DARPA program manager for Insect Allies. “DARPA plans to harness the power of this natural system by engineering genes inside plant viruses that can be transmitted by insects to confer protective traits to the target plants they feed upon.”

Insect Allies’ three technical areas—trait design, insect vector optimization, and selective gene therapy in mature plants—layer together to support the goal of rapidly transforming mature plants to protect against natural or intentional agricultural disruption without the need for extensive infrastructure. The foundational knowledge and generalizable tools developed under the program could also support future agricultural innovation.

One of the most effective existing methods for protecting plants—selective breeding of disease resistance—typically involves five to seven years of work to identify the relevant protective genes and another 10 years or more to propagate the desired traits throughout plant populations. Insect Allies aims to effect the expression of desired traits within a single season. Performers will be challenged to develop compatible systems of naturally occurring plant viruses, herbivorous insects, and target crops, then genetically tune these systems to maximize transmission and uptake of traits across the entire target plant population with zero transmission to non-target plants.

“Genetic modification of plants has historically been done only to plant embryos inside of laboratories using tissue cultures,” Bextine said. “Transforming mature plants en masse would be an enormous achievement and pave the way for future breakthroughs in agriculture.”

Insect Allies will emphasize biosafety and biosecurity. All work will be conducted inside closed laboratories, greenhouses, or other secured facilities.

DARPA will host a Proposers Day on November 18, 2016, at the Executive Conference Center in Arlington, Va., to further clarify the program vision and answer questions from potential proposers. There is a webcast option for the Proposers Day. Advance registration is required: http://www.sa-meetings.com/InsectAlliesProposersDay. Additional details are provided in a Special Notice: https://www.fbo.gov/spg/ODA/DARPA/CMO/DARPA-SN-16-73/listing.html. Full program details, including instructions for submitting a proposal, are available in the Broad Agency Announcement: https://www.fbo.gov/spg/ODA/DARPA/CMO/HR001117S0002/listing.html.


Canada: Public Health Notice – Outbreaks of Salmonella infections linked to raw chicken, including frozen raw breaded chicken products

Public Health Agency of Canada

Why you should take note

The Public Health Agency of Canada is collaborating with provincial and territorial public health partners, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency and Health Canada to investigate outbreaks of Salmonella infections across Canada linked to raw chicken, including frozen raw breaded chicken products.

On September 13, 2018, Canada’s Council of Chief Medical Officers of Health issued a statement advising Canadians to follow proper food safety practices when handling, preparing or consuming frozen raw breaded chicken products such as chicken nuggets, chicken strips, chicken burgers, popcorn chicken and chicken fries.

When not thoroughly cooked, frozen breaded chicken products containing raw chicken pose an increased health risk to individuals who handle, prepare or consume them. These products may appear to be pre-cooked or browned, but they should be handled and prepared with caution. Illnesses can be avoided by following cooking instructions carefully and verifying the internal temperature after cooking, as recommended, before consuming these products. Frozen raw breaded chicken products and raw chicken pieces must be cooked to an internal temperature of at least 74°C (165°F) to ensure that they are safe to eat. Whole chicken needs to be cooked to an internal temperature of 82°C (180°F).

Summary of investigations

In May 2017, Government of Canada scientists began using a new technology called “whole genome sequencing” to help identify and respond to outbreaks. Over the past year and a half, federal, provincial and territorial health and food safety partners have investigated 12 national outbreaks linked to raw chicken, including frozen raw breaded chicken products. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency has issued food recall warnings for seven products linked to some of these outbreak investigations.

As of September 13, 2018, there have been 419 laboratory-confirmed cases of Salmonella illness investigated as part of the illness outbreaks across the country: British Columbia (36), Alberta (60), Saskatchewan (13), Manitoba (19), Ontario (146), Quebec (98), New Brunswick (23), Nova Scotia (9), Prince Edward Island (1), Newfoundland and Labrador (10), Northwest Territories (1), Yukon (1), and Nunavut (2). There have been 86 individuals hospitalized as part of these outbreaks. Three individuals have died; however, Salmonella was not the cause of death for two of those individuals, and it was not determined whether Salmonella contributed to the cause of death for the third individual. Infections have occurred in Canadians of all ages and genders.

All current and future Salmonella outbreak investigations linked to raw chicken, including frozen raw breaded chicken products, and related food recall warnings will be listed in the next section of the public health notice to remind Canadians of the ongoing risk associated with these types of food products.

Active investigations

Active national Salmonella outbreak investigations linked to raw chicken including frozen raw breaded chicken products, coordinated by the Public Health Agency of Canada:

 

 

September 13, 2018 (update) – Salmonella Enteritidis
September 13, 2018 (update) – Salmonella Enteritidis

 

 

Canadians are advised not to consume the recalled products, and retailers and restaurants are advised to not sell or serve the recalled products.

Information about previously investigated and currently closed national Salmonella outbreak investigations linked to raw chicken including frozen raw breaded chicken products, coordinated by the Public Health Agency of Canada since May 2017 is available at the end of this notice.

Who is most at risk

Anyone can become sick with a Salmonella infection, but infants, children, seniors and those with weakened immune systems are at higher risk of serious illness because their immune systems are more fragile.

Most people who become ill from a Salmonella infection will recover fully after a few days. It is possible for some people to be infected with the bacteria and to not get sick or show any symptoms, but to still be able to spread the infection to others.

What you should do to protect your health

Check to see whether you have the recalled frozen raw breaded chicken products in your home or place of business. If you do:

  • Do not use or eat the recalled products. Secure the recalled products in a plastic bag and then either throw them out or return them to the store where they were purchased.
  • If you do not have the original packaging of a frozen raw breaded chicken product and you are unsure of whether it is included in the food recall warnings, throw it out just to be safe.

Wash your hands with soap and warm water immediately following any contact with a recalled product.

Beyond recalled food items, frozen raw breaded chicken products may appear to be pre-cooked or browned, but they may contain raw chicken and should be handled and prepared no differently from other raw chicken products.

If you are preparing breaded chicken products, such as nuggets, strips, burgers or fries, the following precautions should be taken to protect your health:

  • Do not eat raw or undercooked frozen breaded chicken products. Cook all frozen raw breaded chicken products to an internal temperature of at least 74°C (165°F) to ensure that they are safe to eat. Use a digital food thermometer to verify the temperature. Insert the digital food thermometer through the side of the product, all the way to the middle. Oven-safe meat thermometers that are designed for testing whole chicken and roasts during cooking are not suitable for testing nuggets, strips or burgers.
  • Microwave cooking of frozen raw breaded chicken products—including chicken nuggets, strips, burgers, popcorn chicken or chicken fries—is not recommended because of the possibility of uneven heating.
  • Always follow the cooking instructions on the package, including for products labelled Uncooked, Cook and Serve, Ready to Cook, and Oven Ready.
  • Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and warm water before and after handling frozen raw breaded chicken products.
  • Use a separate plate, cutting board and utensils when handling frozen raw breaded chicken products to prevent the spread of harmful bacteria.
  • Do not re-use plates, cutting boards or utensils that have come in contact with frozen raw breaded chicken products to serve the cooked product unless they have been thoroughly washed.

Foods carrying Salmonella may look, smell and taste normal, so it’s important to follow safe food-handling tips for buying, chilling, thawing, cleaning, cooking, and storing any chicken products:

  • Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and warm water before and after handling all types of raw chicken.
  • Always follow the cooking instructions provided on the package. Cook chicken to a safe internal temperature that has been checked using a digital thermometer. Raw chicken pieces should be cooked to an internal temperature of 74°C (165°F). Whole chicken should be cooked to an internal temperature of 82°C (180°F).
  • Keep raw chicken away from other food while shopping, storing, repackaging, cooking and serving foods.
  • Never rinse chicken before using it because the bacteria can spread everywhere the water splashes, creating more of a hazard.
  • Use warm, soapy water to clean knives, cutting boards, utensils, your hands, and any surfaces that have come in contact with food, especially meat, chicken and fish.
  • If you have been diagnosed with a Salmonella infection or any other gastrointestinal illness, do not cook food for other people.
  • For more information, read our poultry safety fact sheet.

Symptoms

Symptoms of a Salmonella infection, called salmonellosis, typically start 6 to 72 hours after exposure to Salmonella bacteria from an infected animal or contaminated product.

Symptoms include:

  • fever
  • chills
  • diarrhea
  • abdominal cramps
  • headache
  • nausea
  • vomiting

These symptoms usually last for four to seven days. In healthy people, salmonellosis often clears up without treatment. In some cases, severe illness and hospitalization may occur. In some cases, antibiotics may be required. People who are infected with Salmonella bacteria can be infectious from several days to several weeks. People who experience symptoms, or who have underlying medical conditions, should contact their health care provider if they suspect they have a Salmonella infection.

What the Government of Canada is doing

The Government of Canada is committed to food safety. The Public Health Agency of Canada leads the human health investigation into an outbreak and is in regular contact with its federal, provincial and territorial partners to monitor the situation and to collaborate on steps to address an outbreak.

Health Canada provides food-related health risk assessments to determine whether the presence of a certain substance or microorganism poses a health risk to consumers.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency conducts food safety investigations into the possible food source of an outbreak.

The Government of Canada will continue to update Canadians as new information related to these investigations becomes available.

Additional information

Media Contact

Public Health Agency of Canada
Media Relations
(613) 957-2983
hc.media.sc@canada.ca

Public Inquiries

Call toll-free: 1-866-225-0709
Email: info@hc-sc.gc.ca

 


The Publix supermarket chain voluntarily recalls ground chuck shipped to stores in two dozen Florida counties.

Florida Health

On August 30, 2018, Publix Super Markets Inc. issued a voluntary recall on an undetermined amount of ground beef products made from chuck that may be contaminated with Escherichia coli, according to a U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) release. To date, there are 15 E. coli cases in Florida associated with the recalled ground beef product.….”


CDC: 40 more cases in a Cyclospora outbreak linked to McDonald’s salads, pushing the illness total to 476.

CDC

  • Case Count: 476
  • States: 15
  • Deaths: 0
  • Hospitalizations: 21


At least 350 people including women and children have been poisoned after eating food in a funeral reception.

MenaFN

“…..Gulab Shah, a resident of the area, said the people fallen ill were in critical situation as there were no transportation facilities to shift the poisoned people to healthcare centers.….”


Cyclospora outbreak tied to McDonald’s salads: 395 cases

CDC

At a Glance

  • Case Count: 395
  • States: 15
  • Deaths: 0
  • Hospitalizations: 16
  • Recall: No

outbreak_map


Multistate Outbreak of Cyclospora Illnesses Likely Linked to Salads from McDonald’s

FDA

The FDA confirms the presence of Cyclospora in Fresh Express salad mix through new laboratory method; Fresh Express recalls expired products containing romaine lettuce.

July 31, 2018 Update

The FDA has confirmed the presence of Cyclospora in an expired salad mix, containing romaine lettuce and carrots, that was produced by the processor Fresh Express in Streamwood, Illinois.

On July 26, 2018, the FDA completed final analysis of an unused package of Fresh Express salad mix containing romaine lettuce and carrots, which had been distributed to McDonald’s. The analysis confirmed the presence of Cyclospora in that sample, though the expiration date for that product, July 19, had already passed. On July 27, the FDA informed Fresh Express of the results, and instructed Fresh Express to determine whether potentially contaminated product may still be on the market.

Fresh Express reported to FDA that the romaine from the same lot as the positive sample was not packaged for direct retail sale by Fresh Express and had already expired. Fresh Express committed to using recall procedures to inform companies that received additional products of concern about the sample result. Fresh Express also reported that the carrots in the sampled salad mix only went to McDonald’s.

On July 30, 2018, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) issued a public health alert on beef, pork and poultry salad and wrap products potentially contaminated with Cyclospora that was distributed by Caito Foods LLC, of Indianapolis, Ind. The products were produced between July 15 and 18, 2018, with either “Best By,” “Enjoy by,” “Best if Sold By” or “Sell By” dates ranging from July 18 through July 23, 2018. Caito Foods had received notification from Fresh Express that the chopped romaine in these products was being recalled.

McDonald’s reports that they stopped using the Fresh Express salad mix at impacted restaurants in IL, IA, IN, WI, MI, OH, MN, NE, SD, MT, ND, KY, WV, and MO on July 13, 2018. The company has since reported that it has replaced the supplier of salads in those states. More information can be found in McDonald’s Statement.

In 2015, FDA set up a multidisciplinary workgroup to prioritize the development, validation and implementation of a method for detecting Cyclospora in fresh produce. In 2018, FDA began using the newly validated Cyclospora method. The availability of this method is a significant advancement in FDA’s ability to investigate outbreaks of cyclosporiasis and identify the parasite in foods.

The investigation is ongoing and the FDA is currently reviewing distribution and supplier information for romaine and carrots.

Fast Facts

  • The FDA, CDC, along with state and local officials are investigating a multi-state outbreak of cyclosporiasis illnesses likely linked to salads from McDonald’s restaurants.
  • On July 26, 2018, the FDA completed final analysis of an unused package of Fresh Express salad mix containing romaine lettuce and carrots, which had been distributed to McDonald’s. The analysis confirmed the presence of Cyclospora in that sample, though the expiration date for that product, July 19, had already passed. On July 27, the FDA informed Fresh Express of the results.
  • FDA instructed Fresh Express to determine whether potentially contaminated product may still be on the market. Fresh Express reported to FDA that the romaine from the same lot as the positive sample was not packaged for direct retail sale by Fresh Express and had already expired. Fresh Express committed to using recall procedures to inform those companies that received this romaine about the sample result. Fresh Express also reported that carrots used in the mix were only sent to McDonald’s locations.
  • On July 30, 2018, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) issued a public health alert on beef, pork and poultry salad and wrap products potentially contaminated with Cyclospora that were distributed by Caito Foods LLC, of Indianapolis, IN. The products were produced between July 15 and 18, 2018, with either “Best By,” “Enjoy by,” “Best if Sold By” or “Sell By” dates ranging from July 18 through July 23, 2018. Caito Foods had received notification from Fresh Express that the chopped romaine in these products was being recalled.
  • The CDC reports that 286 people in 15 states have become ill. There have been 11 hospitalizations and no deaths.
  • The investigation is ongoing and the FDA is currently reviewing distribution and supplier information for romaine and carrots.
  • As of July 13, 2018, McDonald’s decided to voluntarily stop selling salads at impacted restaurants in IL, IA, IN, WI, MI, OH, MN, NE, SD, MT, ND, KY, WV, and MO. The company has since reported that it has replaced the supplier of salads in those states. More information can be found in McDonald’s Statement.
  • Consumers who have symptoms of cyclosporiasis should contact their health care provider to report their symptoms and receive care. Most people infected with Cyclospora develop diarrhea, with frequent, sometimes explosive, bowel movements. Other common symptoms include loss of appetite, weight loss, stomach cramps/pain, bloating, increased gas, nausea, and fatigue. Vomiting, body aches, headache, fever, and other flu-like symptoms may be noted. Some people who are infected with Cyclospora do not have any symptoms. If not treated, the illness may last from a few days to a month or longer. Symptoms may seem to go away and then return one or more times (relapse).
  • At this time, we do not have evidence to suggest that this cluster of illnesses is related to the ongoing Cyclospora outbreak linked to Del Monte vegetable trays.

What is the Problem and What is Being Done About It?

FDA, CDC, state, and local partners are currently investigating several Cyclospora illnesses associated with McDonald’s locations in IA, IL, IN, KY, MN, MO, NE, OH, SD, and WI.

CDC has reported 286 laboratory-confirmed cases of cyclosporiasis in persons from CT, FL, IA, IL, IN, KY, MI, MN, MO, NE, OH, SD, TN, VA and WI who reportedly consumed salad products from several McDonald’s locations. The Florida case-patient purchased a salad while traveling in Kentucky and the Connecticut, Michigan, Tennessee, and Virginia case-patients purchased salads while traveling in Illinois.

On July 26, 2018, the FDA completed final analysis of an unused package of Fresh Express salad mix containing romaine lettuce and carrots, which had been distributed to McDonald’s. The analysis confirmed the presence of Cyclospora in that sample, though the expiration date for that product, July 19, had already passed. On July 27, the FDA informed Fresh Express of the results.

Fresh Express reported to FDA that the romaine from the same lot as the positive sample was not packaged for direct retail sale by Fresh Express and had already expired. Fresh Express committed to using recall procedures to inform those companies that received this romaine about the sample result.

On July 30, 2018, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) issued a public health alert on beef, pork and poultry salad and wrap products potentially contaminated with Cyclospora that were distributed by Caito Foods LLC, of Indianapolis, Ind. The products were produced between July 15 to 18, 2018, with either “Best By,” “Enjoy by,” Best if Sold By” or “Sell By” dates ranging from July 18 through July 23, 2018. Caito Foods had received notification from Fresh Express that the chopped romaine in these products was being recalled.

Fresh Express reported that the carrots in the mix only went to McDonald’s.

McDonald’s reports that they stopped using the Fresh Express salad mix at impacted restaurants in IL, IA, IN, WI, MI, OH, MN, NE, SD, MT, ND, KY, WV, and MO on July 13, 2018. The company has since reported that it has replaced the supplier of salads in those states. More information can be found in McDonald’s Statement.

The investigation is ongoing and the FDA is currently reviewing distribution and supplier information for romaine and carrots.

Consumers who have symptoms of cyclosporiasis should contact their health care provider to report their symptoms and receive care. Most people infected with Cyclospora develop diarrhea, with frequent, sometimes explosive, bowel movements.

Other common symptoms include loss of appetite, weight loss, stomach cramps/pain, bloating, increased gas, nausea, and fatigue. Vomiting, body aches, headache, fever, and other flu-like symptoms may be noted. Some people who are infected with Cyclospora do not have any symptoms. If not treated, the illness may last from a few days to a month or longer. Symptoms may seem to go away and then return one or more times (relapse).

In 2015, FDA set up a multidisciplinary workgroup to prioritize the development, validation and implementation of a method for detecting Cyclospora in fresh produce. In 2018, FDA began using the newly validated Cyclospora method. The availability of this method is a significant advancement in FDA’s ability to investigate outbreaks of cyclosporiasis and identify the parasite in foods.

At this time, we do not have evidence to suggest that this cluster of illnesses is related to the ongoing Cyclospora outbreak linked to Del Monte vegetable trays.

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What is Cyclospora?

Cyclospora cayetanensis is a microscopic parasite of humans. This parasite, when it contaminates food or water and is then ingested, can cause an intestinal illness called cyclosporiasis.

The Cyclospora parasite needs time (days to weeks) after being passed in a bowel movement to become infectious for another person. Therefore, it is unlikely that cyclosporiasis is passed directly from one person to another.

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What are the Symptoms of Cyclosporiasis

Most people infected with Cyclospora develop diarrhea, with frequent, sometimes explosive, bowel movements. Other common symptoms include loss of appetite, weight loss, stomach cramps/pain, bloating, increased gas, nausea, and fatigue. Vomiting, body aches, headache, fever, and other flu-like symptoms may be noted. Some people who are infected with Cyclospora do not have any symptoms. If not treated, the illness may last from a few days to a month or longer. Symptoms may seem to go away and then return one or more times (relapse).

Who is at Risk?

Anyone who consumed salads from McDonald’s in IA, IL, IN, KY, MN, MO, NE, OH, SD, and WI after May 20, 2018, could have been exposed to the pathogen. People can become infected with Cyclospora by consuming food or water contaminated with the parasite.

Also, at possible risk is anyone who consumed beef, pork and poultry salad and wrap products named in the July 30, 2018, public health alert issued by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) after May 20, 2018.

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What Do Restaurants and Retailers Need To Do?

  • Retailers, restaurants, and other food service operators should always practice safe food handling and preparation measures. It is recommended that they wash hands, utensils, and surfaces with hot, soapy water before and after handling food. Wash and sanitize display cases and refrigerators where potentially contaminated products were stored.
  • Wash and sanitize cutting boards, surfaces, and utensils used to prepare, serve, or store potentially contaminated products.
  • Wash hands with hot water and soap following the cleaning and sanitation process.
  • Regular frequent cleaning and sanitizing of food contact surfaces and utensils used in food preparation may help to minimize the likelihood of cross-contamination.

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What Do Consumers Need To Do?

Consumers who have symptoms of cyclosporiasis should contact their health care provider to report their symptoms and receive care. Most people infected with Cyclospora develop diarrhea, with frequent, sometimes explosive, bowel movements. Other common symptoms include loss of appetite, weight loss, stomach cramps/pain, bloating, increased gas, nausea, and fatigue. Vomiting, body aches, headache, fever, and other flu-like symptoms (relapse).

Who Should be Contacted?

Contact your healthcare provider if you have diarrhea that lasts for more than three days. The FDA encourages consumers with questions about food safety to Submit An Inquiry, or to visit www.fda.gov/fcic for additional information.


People infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella, by state of residence, as of July 30, 2018 (n=79)

Map of United States - People infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella, by state of residence, as of July 30, 2018

CDC, public health and regulatory officials in several states, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration are investigating a multistate outbreak of Salmonella infections linked to Spring Pasta Salad purchased at Hy-Vee grocery stores.

Advice to Consumers, Restaurants, and Retailers

Illustration of a clipboard with check marks on it.

At A Glance

Photo of Hy-Vee Spril Pasta Salad with label. Photo of Hy-Vee Spril Pasta Salad without label.

  • On July 17, 2018, Hy-Vee, Inc. recalled its Spring Pasta Salad because it might be contaminated with Salmonella.
  • Do not eat recalled Hy-Vee Spring Pasta Salad.
    • The Spring Pasta Salad includes shell pasta, carrots, celery, cucumbers, green pepper, onion, and mayonnaise.
    • The recalled pasta salad was sold in 1-pound (16 oz.) and 3-pound (48 oz.) plastic containers or may have been scooped at the deli counter into clear plastic containers.
    • The recalled pasta salad was sold in all Hy-Vee grocery stores in Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, South Dakota, and Wisconsin.
    • The expiration dates for the recalled pasta salad range from June 22, 2018 to August 3, 2018.
  • Return the recalled Spring Pasta Salad to the store for a refund or throw it away. Even if some of it was eaten and no one got sick, do not eat it.
    • If you stored recalled pasta salad in another container, throw the pasta salad away. Thoroughly wash the container with warm, soapy water before using it again, to remove harmful germs that could contaminate other food.
  • Contact a healthcare provider if you think you got sick from eating recalled Hy-Vee Spring Pasta Salad.
  • Restaurants and retailers should not serve or sell recalled Hy-Vee Spring Pasta Salad.

Latest Outbreak Information

Illustration of a megaphone.
  • Fifty-eight more ill people from nine states were added to this outbreak since the last update on July 18, 2018. Four more states reported ill people: Illinois, Kansas, North Dakota, and Tennessee.
  • Salmonella enterica subspecies IIIb has been added to this investigation because two people were infected with this strain of Salmonella and with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Sandiego at the same time. A search of the CDC PulseNet database found six additional people infected with the strain of Salmonella enterica subspecies IIIb and these cases have also been added to the outbreak.
  • A total of 79 people infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella have been reported from nine states.
  • Illnesses started on dates ranging from June 21, 2018, to July 15, 2018.
  • Epidemiologic evidence indicates that Spring Pasta Salad purchased at Hy-Vee grocery stores is a likely source of the outbreak.
  • This investigation is ongoing, and CDC will provide updates when more information is available.

Symptoms of Salmonella Infection

Illustration of a person with stomach pain.
  • Most people infected with Salmonella develop diarrhea, fever, and stomach cramps 12 to 72 hours after being exposed to the bacteria.
  • The illness usually lasts 4 to 7 days, and most people recover without treatment.
  • In some people, the diarrhea may be so severe that the patient needs to be hospitalized. Salmonella infection may spread from the intestines to the bloodstream and then to other places in the body.
  • Children younger than 5 years, adults older than 65 years, and people with weakened immune systems are more likely to have a severe illness.

Investigation Details

August 1, 2018

Since the last update on July 18, 2018, 58 ill people have been added to this investigation. This includes six people who have been infected with a strain of Salmonella enterica subspecies IIIb, and two people infected with this strain and with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Sandiego at the same time.

As of July 30, 2018, 79 people infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella Sandiego (71 people), Salmonella enterica subspecies IIIb (6 people), or both (2 people) have been reported from nine states. A list of the states and the number of cases in each can be found on the Map of Reported Cases page.

Illnesses started on dates ranging from June 21, 2018, to July 15, 2018. Ill people range in age from 1 year to 89, with a median age of 47. Among ill people, 67% are female. Out of 74 people with information available, 18 (24%) have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported.

Illnesses that occurred after July 8, 2018, might not yet be reported due to the time it takes between when a person becomes ill and when the illness is reported. This takes an average of 2 to 4 weeks. Please see the Timeline for Reporting Cases of Salmonella Infection for more details.

State and local health officials continue to interview ill people and ask questions about the foods they ate and other exposures in the week before they became ill. Forty-seven (80%) of 59 people interviewed reported eating Spring Pasta Salad from Hy-Vee grocery stores in Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Nebraska, and South Dakota. The ill people in North Dakota and Tennessee traveled to states where Hy-Vee grocery stores are located.

This investigation is ongoing, and CDC will provide updates when more information is available.


A multistate outbreak of multidrug-resistant Salmonella Reading infections linked to raw turkey products

CDC

Posted July 19, 2018 at 12:00 PM EDT

CDC and public health and regulatory officials in several states are investigating a multistate outbreak of multidrug-resistant Salmonella Reading infections linked to raw turkey products. The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (USDA-FSIS) is monitoring the outbreak.

Latest Outbreak Information

At A Glance

  • Ninety people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Reading have been reported from 26 states.
    • Forty people have been hospitalized, and no deaths have been reported.
  • Epidemiologic and laboratory evidence indicates that raw turkey products from a variety of sources are contaminated with Salmonella Reading and are making people sick.
  • In interviews, ill people report eating different types and brands of turkey products purchased from many different locations. Two ill people lived in a household where raw turkey pet food was fed to pets.
  • The outbreak strain has been identified in samples taken from raw turkey pet food, raw turkey products, and live turkeys.
  • A single, common supplier of raw turkey products or of live turkeys has not been identified.
  • The outbreak strain of Salmonella Reading is present in live turkeys and in many types of raw turkey products, indicating it might be widespread in the turkey industry. CDC and USDA-FSIS have shared this information with representatives from the turkey industry and asked about steps that they may be taking to reduce Salmonella contamination.

Advice to Consumers and Retailers

Always handle raw turkey carefully and cook it thoroughly to prevent food poisoning. This outbreak is a reminder that raw turkey products can have germs that spread around food preparation areas and can make you sick.

CDC is not advising that consumers avoid eating properly cooked turkey products, or that retailers stop selling raw turkey products.

CDC advises consumers to follow these steps to help prevent Salmonella infection from raw turkey:

  • Wash your hands. Salmonella infections can spread from one person to another. Wash hands before and after preparing or eating food, after contact with animals, and after using the restroom or changing diapers.
  • Cook raw turkey thoroughly to kill harmful germs. Turkey breasts, whole turkeys, and ground poultry, including turkey burgers, casseroles, and sausage, should always be cooked to an internal temperature of 165°F to kill harmful germs. Leftovers should be reheated to 165°F. Use a food thermometer to check, and place it in the thickest part of the food.
  • Don’t spread germs from raw turkey around food preparation areas. Washing raw poultry before cooking is not recommended. Germs in raw poultry juices can spread to other areas and foods. Thoroughly wash hands, counters, cutting boards, and utensils with warm, soapy water after they touch raw turkey. Use a separate cutting board for raw turkey and other raw meats if possible.
  • CDC does not recommend feeding raw diets to pets. Germs like Salmonella in raw pet food can make your pets sick. Your family also can get sick by handling the raw food or by taking care of your pet.

CDC will update the advice to consumers and retailers if more information comes available, such as a supplier or type of raw turkey product linked to illness.

Symptoms of Salmonella Infection

  • Most people infected with Salmonella develop diarrhea, fever, and stomach cramps 12 to 72 hours after being exposed to the bacteria.
  • The illness usually lasts 4 to 7 days, and most people recover without treatment.
  • In some people, the diarrhea may be so severe that the patient needs to be hospitalized. Salmonella infection may spread from the intestines to the bloodstream and then to other places in the body.
  • In rare cases, Salmonella infection can cause death unless the person is treated promptly with antibiotics.
  • Children younger than 5 years of age, adults older than 65 years of age, and people with weakened immune systems are more likely to have severe illness.
  • For more information, see the CDCSalmonella website.

Investigation Details

July 18, 2018

CDC and public health and regulatory officials in several states are investigating a multistate outbreak of Salmonella Reading infections linked to raw turkey products. The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety Inspection Service (USDA-FSIS) is monitoring the outbreak.

Public health investigators are using the PulseNet system to identify illnesses that may be part of this outbreak. PulseNet is the national subtyping network of public health and food regulatory agency laboratories coordinated by CDC. DNA fingerprinting is performed on Salmonella bacteria isolated from ill people by using techniques called pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and whole genome sequencing (WGS). CDC PulseNet manages a national database of these DNA fingerprints to identify possible outbreaks. WGS gives a more detailed DNA fingerprint than PFGE. WGS performed on Salmonella from ill people in this outbreak showed that they are closely related genetically. This means that the ill people are more likely to share a common source of infection.

As of July 11, 2018, 90 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Reading have been reported from 26 states. A list of the states and the number of cases in each can be found on the Map of Reported Cases page.

Illnesses started on dates from November 20, 2017, to June 29, 2018. Ill people range in age from less than 1 year to 91, with a median age of 41. Sixty-one percent are female. Of 78 people with information available, 40 (51%) have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported.

Investigation of the Outbreak

In interviews, ill people answered questions about the foods they ate and other exposures in the week before they became ill. Of 61 people interviewed, 37 (61%) people interviewed reported preparing or eating turkey products that were purchased raw, including ground turkey, turkey pieces, and whole turkey. Ill people reported buying many different brands of raw turkey products from multiple stores. Also, two of the 61 ill people interviewed became sick after pets in their home ate raw ground turkey pet food. Three of the 61 ill people interviewed worked in a facility that raises or processes turkeys, or lived with someone who did.

The outbreak strain of Salmonella Reading has been identified in samples from raw turkey pet food in Minnesota, from raw turkey products from 19 slaughter and 6 processing establishments, and from live turkeys from several states.  The samples collected by FSIS at these slaughter and processing establishments were part of FSIS’ routine testing under the Salmonella performance standards. Furthermore, WGS showed that the Salmonella strain from these samples is closely related genetically to the Salmonella strain from ill people.  This result provides more evidence that people in this outbreak got sick from preparing raw turkey products.

WGS analysis did not identify predicted antibiotic resistance in 68 isolates from 28 ill people and 40 food and animal samples. However, 33 isolates from ill people and 49 isolates from food and animal samples contained genes for resistance to all or some of the following antibiotics: ampicillin, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline, gentamicin, and kanamycin. Testing of four outbreak isolates using standard antibiotic susceptibility testing by CDC’s National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS) laboratory confirmed these results. This resistance likely will not affect the choice of antibiotic used to treat most people since these antibiotics are not normally used to treat Salmonella infections.

Available data indicate that this strain of Salmonella Reading may be present in live turkeys and in raw turkey products. A single, common supplier of raw turkey products or of live turkeys has not been identified.

CDC and USDA-FSIS shared the results of the investigation with representatives from the turkey industry to make them aware of the outbreak and resulting illnesses, and to ask them about steps they may be taking to reduce Salmonella contamination. Because investigation results suggest this strain of Salmonella Reading is present in both live turkeys and in raw turkey products, further investigation and interventions to reduce the prevalence of this strain should target both the live turkey industry and turkey processing facilities. Consumers should be aware that raw turkey may be contaminated with germs and consumers should always follow steps to prevent Salmonella infection from these products.

Map of United States - People infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella, by state of residence, as of July 11, 2018

Epi curve of people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella, by date of illness onset, as of July 11, 2018


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