Global & Disaster Medicine

Archive for the ‘Conflict’ Category

9/1/1983: Soviet jet fighters intercept a Korean Airlines passenger flight in Russian airspace and shoot the plane down, killing 269 passengers and crewmembers.

HxC


1,300 or more children of European fighters and followers of the self-professed caliphate remain trapped in Syria and Iraq. What to do?

NYT

“….The issue is politically charged across Europe. ISIS survivors, even children, are seen as a threat, no matter how reformed they appear……”


A roadside bomb tore through a bus in western Afghanistan on Wednesday, killing at least 32 people, including women and children

FOX


Hong Kong: What next?

CNBC

“…..Key Points
  • Protests continue to roil Hong Kong as demonstrators clash with police and call for full democracy and autonomy in the city.
  • According to one think tank expert, the most likely outcome of the demonstrations will be for authorities to wait out the protests, arrest rally leaders and “slowly bring the city back to order.”
  • It’s also possible, although less likely, that Beijing could send in its military — or that it could acquiesce to some protester demands……”


7/17/2014: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 was shot down over the Ukraine-Russia border killing all 298 on board

HxC


The humanitarian crisis in Yemen continues

MEMO

“The United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) said….that essential services in Yemen are on the verge of total collapse as the war enters its fifth year. It added that only 51 per cent of the country’s health facilities are still working in full, although they suffer from a severe shortage of medicines, equipment and staff.

“As the conflict in Yemen enters its fifth year, the salaries of more than 1.25 million government employees, including doctors, social workers and other public sector workers, have been suspended for more than two and a half years” the organization said in a report, explaining that the suspension has led to the closure or reduction of working hours of vital facilities such as health facilities, schools, water and sanitation facilities and other essential social services…..”


A record 70.8 million people had been forcibly displaced by war, persecution and other violence worldwide at the end of 2018

NPR

 


The humanitarian crisis in Yemen continues…..Yemen Snapshots: 2015-2019

ReliefWeb

Crisis In Yemen : Document 2019

preview

 

“…….The Scale of the Conflict:

  • ACLED (Armed Conflict Location & Event Data) records over 91,600 total reported fatalities from the start of 2015 to the present
    • Approximately 17,100 were reported in 2015; 15,100 in 2016; 16,800 in 2017; 30,800 in 2018; and 11,900 in 2019 thus far
  • More than 39,700 conflict events have been reported since the start of 2015
    • Approximately 7,700 in 2015; 8,700 in 2016; 7,900 in 2017; 10,200 in 2018; and 4,900 in 2019 thus far
  • Overall, 2018 is the war’s deadliest and most violent year on record

Impact on Civilians:

  • ACLED records nearly 4,500 direct civilian targeting events resulting in approximately 11,700 reported civilian fatalities since 2015
    • Approximately 4,500 reported fatalities in 2015; 2,200 in 2016; 1,900 in 2017; 2,400 in 2018; and 600 in 2019 thus far
  • 2015 is the deadliest year for direct anti-civilian violence on record, with almost twice the number of reported fatalities recorded during 2018, the second-most lethal year
  • The Saudi-led coalition and its allies remain responsible for the highest number of reported civilian fatalities from direct targeting, with over 8,000 since 2015…..”

6/6/1944: 155,000 Allied troops–Americans, British and Canadians–had successfully stormed Normandy’s beaches. Over 4,400 Allied soldiers died, as did between 4,000 and 9,000 German soldiers..


Charting an Ethical Course in Providing care Within Global Areas of Conflict

Ethical Challenges in Humanitarianism during Violent Situations

Reality Makes Our Decisions: Ethical Challenges in Humanitarian Health in Situations of Extreme Violence

Report and recommendations: a collaboration among Center for Public Health and Human Rights, Center for Humanitarian Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health | International Rescue Committee | Syrian American Medical Society

 

“…….The ethical principles include respect for persons (i.e., respect for human dignity and for individuals’ autonomous choices), beneficence (the promotion of others’ well-being), non-maleficence “do no harm”, and justice (in both fair distribution of resources and fair processes for decision-making). These four principles, can be adapted to the provision of health care to communities, though how the principles are weighed and applied might differ…..”


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