Global & Disaster Medicine

Archive for the ‘Fires/Wildfires’ Category

National Fire SitRep

NIFC

National Interagency Coordination Center Incident Management Situation Report Saturday, August 11, 2018 – 0530 MT National Preparedness Level 5

National Fire Activity Initial Attack Activity: Light (84 fires)

New large incidents: 6

Large fires contained: 3

Uncontained large fires:** 52

Area Command teams committed: 0 NIMOs committed: 1 Type 1 IMTs committed: 14 Type 2 IMTs committed: 18 Nationally, there are 52 large fires being managed under a strategy other than full suppression. **Uncontained large fires include only fires being managed under a full suppression strategy. Link to Geographic Area daily reports.

On August 9th a firefighter with CAL FIRE Butte Unit was fatally injured in a vehicle accident while assigned to the Carr fire near Redding, CA. The firefighting community extends condolences to the friends and family of the deceased.
One hundred thirty-eight fireline management personnel from Australia and New Zealand are assigned to support large fires in the California and Northwest Areas.

Two MAFFS C-130 airtankers and support personnel from the 152nd Airlift Wing (Nevada Air National Guard), one from the 146th Airlift Wing (California Air National Guard) and one from the 302nd Airlift Wing (Colorado Springs, Air Force Reserve) have been deployed to McClellan Airfield, CA in support of wildland fire operations.

One RC-26 aircraft with Distributed Real-Time Infrared (DRTI) capability and support personnel from the 141st Air Refueling Wing (Washington Air National Guard) has been deployed to Spokane, WA in support of wildland fire operations in the West.


Holy fire, 10% contained, has injured three firefighters and displaced more than 20,000 people.

LA Times

 


National Significant Wildland Fire Potential Outlook

National Significant Wildland Fire Potential Outlook

OUTLOOKS


The National Multi-Agency Coordination Group (NMAC): Preparedness Levels

National Preparedness Levels

The National Multi-Agency Coordination Group (NMAC) establishes Preparedness Levels throughout the calendar year to help assure that firefighting resources are ready to respond to new incidents. Preparedness Levels are dictated by fuel and weather conditions, fire activity, and resource availability.

The five Preparedness Levels range from 1 to 5, with 5 being the highest level. Each Preparedness Level has specific management directions. As the Preparedness Levels rise, more federal and state employees become available for fire mobilization if needed.

Large Incident: A wildfire of 100 acres or more occuring in timber, or a wildfire of 300 acres or more occuring in grass/sage.
Wildland Fire: Any nonstructure fire, other than prescribed fire, that occurs in the wildland.
Wildland Fire – IMT1: Wildland fire; Type 1 Incident Management Team Assigned.
Wildland Fire – IMT2: Wildland fire; Type 2 Incident Management Team Assigned.
Wildland Fire – Other: Wildland fire; Other Incident Management Team Assigned besides a Type 1 or Type 2 team (e.g. Type 3).

Preparedness Level 1

Geographic Areas accomplish incident management objectives utilizing local resources with little or no national support.
– Conditions are not favorable to support significant wildland fire activity in most geographic areas.
– Resource capability is adequate with little or no mobilization of resources occurring through the National Interagency Coordination Center.
– Potential for emerging significant wildland fires is expected to remain minimal.

Preparedness Level 2

Active Geographic Areas (GA’s) are unable to independently accomplish incident management objectives. Resource capability remains stable enough nationally to sustain incident operations and meet objectives in active GA’s.
– Significant wildland fire activity is increasing in a few geographic areas.
– Resources within most geographic areas are adequate to manage the current situation, with light to moderate mobilization of resources occurring through the National Interagency Coordination Center.
– Potential for emerging significant wildland fires is normal to below normal for the time of year.

Preparedness Level 3

Mobilization of resources nationally is required to sustain incident management operations in the active Geographic Areas (GA’s). National priorities established as a necessary measure to address the heavy and persistent demand for shared resources among active GA’s.
– Significant wildland fire activity is occurring in multiple geographic areas, with Incident Management Teams (IMTs) actively engaged.
– Mobilization of resources through the National Interagency Coordination Center is moderate to heavy.
– Potential for emerging significant wildland fires is normal for the time of year.

Preparedness Level 4

Shared resources are heavily committed. National mobilization trends affect all Geographic Areas (GA’s) and regularly occur over larger and larger distances. National priorities govern resources of all types. Heavy demand on inactive/low activity GA’s with low levels of activity for available resources.
– Significant wildland fire activity is occurring in multiple geographic areas; significant commitment of Incident Management Teams.
– NICC increasingly engages GACCs in an effort to coordinate and fill orders for available resources.
– Potential for significant incidents emerging in multiple GA’s indicates that resource demands will continue or increase.

Preparedness Level 5

National mobilization is heavily committed and measures need to be taken to support GA’s. Active GA’s must take emergency measures to sustain incident operations.
– Full commitment of national resources is ongoing.
– Resource orders filled at NICC by specifically coordinating requests with GACCs as resources become available.
– Potential for emerging significant wildland fires is high and expected to remain high in multiple geographic areas.


Drones and Wildfires


At more than 443 sq. miles, the Mendocino Complex fire becomes largest wildfire in California history

NBC


The Mendocino Complex Fire has charred more than 254,000 acres, making it the fifth largest blaze in California’s history.

Accuweather


NASA: Wildfires Blanket Western States With Smoke

Wildfires Blanket Western States With Smoke

The 2018 wildfire season in North America is well under way, with blazes having burned more acres than average through the end of July. Earlier in the summer, satellite images showed smoke and burn scars from fires in western states including California and Colorado. As the calendar turns to August, smoke is now streaming from fires in nearly every western state.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra and Aqua satellites acquired these natural-color images on July 28 and 29. The animation shows how winds can make smoke plumes vary daily in direction and distance from their source.

A notable amount of the smoke stems from the Carr Fire, which is burning in Shasta County near Redding, California. The fire ignited on July 23 amid warm, dry conditions. By July 30, it had burned 98,724 acres and was just 20 percent contained, according to Cal Fire. News reports noted that shifting, gusty winds and a lack of rain in the forecast could worsen the situation.

Other states also contributed to the smoke pall over the West. According to the National Interagency Fire Center, 98 large active fires were burning across the United States on July 30, having consumed 1.2 million acres. States with the largest fires counts included Oregon (16), Alaska (15), Arizona (10), Colorado (13), and California (9).

Most areas of burning land are not directly visible in satellite imagery, obscured from view by smoke and clouds. The Perry Fire in Nevada is an exception; check out these Landsat images to see how the fire advanced over the span of a day.

NASA Earth Observatory images by Lauren Dauphin, using MODIS data from LANCE/EOSDIS Rapid Response. Story by Kathryn Hansen.


Carr Fire: One hospital evacuated; neonatal patients evacuated from another & 8 intermediate care facilities fully evacuated

FEMA Document

Carr Fire – Shasta County, CA
Current Situation

• Fire continues to spread in the north and south; progression into the city of Redding has slowed. Shifting winds in timber fuels combine with steep drainages below control lines are contributing to spot fires crossing lines.

• Fatalities / Injuries: 6 confirmed / 0

• Acres burned: 104k (+8,632); Containment: 23% (+6) • Structures / Homes: o Threatened: 4,012 homes (-966), 22 multiple residences, 12 commercial o Damaged: 209 structures (+44); 165 homes (+22) o Destroyed: 1,132 structures (+258); 818 homes (+161)

• Evacuations: Mandatory for approximately 35k (-4k) people

• Hospitals: o One hospital evacuated; neo-natal patients evacuated from another o Eight intermediate care facilities fully evacuated

• Shelters / Occupants: 5 open / 281 (-156)  occupants (ARC Midnight Shelter Count)

• Infrastructure: o Power outages: 3k customers*; Gas outages: 250 customers o Power grid is stable with excess capacity  o Trinity power plant continues operation; full grid restoration pending inspection
Carr Fire – Shasta County, CA

State / Local Response

• CA EOC at Full Activation; Southern REOC at Partial Activation (day shift only)

• Governor declared a State of Emergency for six counties
FEMA Response

• Emergency Declaration FEMA-3398-EM-CA approved July 28, 2018

• FMAG FEMA-5259-FM-CA approved July 23, 2018

• Region IX: o RWC at Steady State, continues to monitor o IMAT-2 deployed to CA EOC (supported by ESFs 1, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 12, & DCO) o LNOs deployed to CA EOC and Shasta County EOC • Staging Area established at Redding Municipal Airport o ISB Team and Cache deployed o Commodities prepositioned: Cots, blankets, meals, and water


The Carr Fire rampaging in the area of Redding has destroyed 818 homes, 311 outbuildings, killed 2 firefightera and 4 civilians.

SF Gate

  • Now the ninth most destructive in the state’s history.
  • More than 27,000 people remain evacuated because of the blaze, which has burned for more than a week.


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