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FEMA: CPG 101, Developing and Maintaining Emergency Operations Plans, Version 2

FEMA

Guide CPG 101 is designed to help both novice and experienced planners navigate the planning process. Used in its entirety, this Guide provides information and instruction on the fundamentals of planning and their application. Chapters 1 and 2 lay the foundation for planning efforts by providing information on the basics of planning (Chapter 1) and the environment within which planners function (Chapter 2). With an understanding of these fundamentals, the Guide then transitions from theory to practice by discussing the different plan formats and functions (Chapter 3) and moving into an explanation of the planning process (Chapter 4). A detailed checklist, building upon Chapters 3 and 4, is provided in Appendix C. Because Appendix C provides a set of detailed questions to consider throughout the planning process, users are encouraged to copy or remove this checklist and employ it as they work through the planning process in Chapter 4.

 


FEMA: An overview of the National Preparedness System.

FEMA

The National Preparedness System is intended to be used by the whole community. The intended audience for this page is individuals, families, communities, the private and nonprofit sectors, faith-based organizations, and local, state, tribal, territorial, insular area, and Federal governments. If you have any questions, please contact the National Integration Center at FEMA-NIC@fema.dhs.gov.

Introduction
Every day, we take steps to keep our nation safe and ensure that we thrive after disasters occur. Whether we face risks related to earthquakes, cyber attacks or chemical spills, our goal is shared: safety and resilience.

The National Preparedness System outlines an organized process for everyone in the whole community to move forward with their preparedness activities and achieve the National Preparedness Goal.

The National Preparedness System has six parts:

Identifying and Assessing Risk. This part involves collecting historical and recent data on existing, potential and perceived threats and hazards. The results of these risk assessments form the basis for the remaining steps.

Estimating Capability Requirements. Next, you can determine the specific capabilities and activities to best address those risks. Some capabilities may already exist and some may need to be built or improved. FEMA provides a list of core capabilities related to protection, prevention, mitigation, response and recovery, the five mission areas of preparedness. To see a full list of the core capabilities, including details about each one, visit our Core Capabilities page on this site.

Building and Sustaining Capabilities. This involves figuring out the best way to use limited resources to build capabilities. You can use the risk assessment to prioritize resources to address the highest probability or highest consequence threats.

Planning to Deliver Capabilities. Because preparedness efforts involve and affect the whole community, it’s important that you coordinate your plans with other organizations. This includes all parts of the whole community: individuals, businesses, nonprofits, community and faith-based groups, and all levels of government.

Validating Capabilities. Now it’s time to see if your activities are working as intended. Participating in exercises, simulations or other activities helps you identify gaps in your plans and capabilities. It also helps you see progress toward meeting preparedness goals. Please visit the National Exercise Division for more information.

Reviewing and Updating. It is important to regularly review and update all capabilities, resources and plans. Risks and resources evolve—and so should your preparedness efforts.

 

Specific Tools and Resources
Depending on your role in the community, you may be in need of specific tools and resources to help you through the cycle of the National Preparedness System. We’ve listed a few below, along with links for more information.

Threat and Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment (THIRA). Guidance for conducting a THIRA at all levels of government can be found in Comprehensive Preparedness Guide (CPG) 201: Second Edition.
Operations Plans. Guidance for creating these plans can be found in Comprehensive Preparedness Guide (CPG) 101: Second Edition.
National Incident Management System. The National Incident Management System (NIMS) provides a systematic, proactive approach to guide organizations in managing all types of incidents. Information about NIMS – including supporting tools and materials – can be found on the NIMS web page.
National Planning System. The National Planning System provides a unified approach and common terminology to support the implementation of the National Preparedness System through plans that support an all threats and hazards approach to preparedness. These plans—whether strategic, operational, or tactical—enable the whole community to build, sustain, and deliver the core capabilities identified in the National Preparedness Goal.
Download Materials
National Preparedness System full document
CPG 201: Second Edition
CPG 101: Second Edition
National Incident Management System
National Planning System
Last Updated:
12/20/2016 – 12:26

 


FEMA: An overview of the five mission areas.

FEMA

Mission Areas

The purpose of this page is to provide an overview of the five mission areas. The intended audience for this page is individuals, families, communities, the private and nonprofit sectors, faith-based organizations, and local, state, tribal, territorial, insular area, and Federal governments.

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseIntroduction

The National Preparedness Goal identified five mission areas, in which it groups the 32 core capabilities (the distinct critical elements needed to achieve the goal).

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapsePrevention

Description: The Prevention mission area comprises the capabilities necessary to avoid, prevent or stop a threatened or actual act of terrorism. It is focused on ensuring we are optimally prepared to prevent an imminent terrorist attack within the United States.

Prevention Core Capabilities:

  • Planning
  • Public Information and Warning
  • Operational Coordination
  • Forensics and Attribution
  • Intelligence and Information Sharing
  • Interdiction and Disruption
  • Screening, Search, and Detection

See the core capabilities page for further descriptions.

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseProtection

Description: The Protection Framework houses “the capabilities necessary to secure the homeland against acts of terrorism and manmade or natural disasters.”

Protection Core Capabilities:

  • Planning
  • Public Information and Warning
  • Operational Coordination
  • Access Control and Identity Verification
  • Cybersecurity
  • Intelligence and Information Sharing
  • Interdiction and Disruption
  • Physical Protective Measures
  • Risk Management for Protection Programs and Activities
  • Screening, Search, and Detection
  • Supply Chain Integrity and Security

See the core capabilities page for further descriptions.

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseMitigation

Description: Mitigation comprises “the capabilities necessary to reduce the loss of life and property by lessening the impact of disasters.”

Mitigation Core Capabilities:

  • Planning
  • Public Information and Warning
  • Operational Coordination
  • Community Resilience
  • Long-Term Vulnerability Reduction
  • Risk and Disaster Resilience Assessment
  • Threats and Hazards Identification

See the core capabilities page for further descriptions.

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseResponse

Description: Response comprises “the capabilities necessary to save lives, protect property and the environment, and meet basic human needs after an incident has occurred.”

Response Core Capabilities:

  • Planning
  • Public Information and Warning
  • Operational Coordination
  • Critical Transportation
  • Environmental Response/Health and Safety
  • Fatality Management Services
  • Fire Management and Suppression
  • Logistics and Supply Chain Management
  • Infrastructure Systems
  • Mass Care Services
  • Mass Search and Rescue Operations
  • On-Scene Security, Protection, and Law Enforcement
  • Operational Communications
  • Public Health, Healthcare, and Medical Services
  • Situational Assessment

See the core capabilities page for further descriptions.

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseRecovery

Description: Recovery comprises “the core capabilities necessary to assist communities affected by an incident to recover effectively.”

Recovery Core Capabilities:

  • Planning
  • Public Information and Warning
  • Operational Coordination
  • Economic Recovery
  • Health and Social Services
  • Housing
  • Infrastructure Systems
  • Natural and Cultural Resources

See the core capabilities page for further descriptions.

Last Updated:
07/05/2016 – 09:57

 


FEMA: 32 core capabilities identified in the National Preparedness Goal

FEMA

These capabilities are referenced in many national preparedness efforts, including the National Planning Frameworks. The Goal grouped the capabilities into five mission areas, based on where they most logically fit. Some fall into only one mission area, while some others apply to several mission areas.

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapsePlanning

  • Mission Areas: All
  • Description: Conduct a systematic process engaging the whole community as appropriate in the development of executable strategic, operational, and/or tactical-level approaches to meet defined objectives.

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapsePublic Information and Warning

  • Mission Areas: All
  • Description: Deliver coordinated, prompt, reliable, and actionable information to the whole community through the use of clear, consistent, accessible, and culturally and linguistically appropriate methods to effectively relay information regarding any threat or hazard, as well as the actions being taken and the assistance being made available, as appropriate.

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseOperational Coordination

  • Mission Areas: All
  • Description: Establish and maintain a unified and coordinated operational structure and process that appropriately integrates all critical stakeholders and supports the execution of core capabilities.

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseForensics and Attribution

  • Mission Area: Prevention
  • Description: Conduct forensic analysis and attribute terrorist acts (including the means and methods of terrorism) to their source, to include forensic analysis as well as attribution for an attack and for the preparation for an attack in an effort to prevent initial or follow-on acts and/or swiftly develop counter-options.

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseIntelligence and Information Sharing

  • Mission Areas: Prevention, Protection
  • Description: Provide timely, accurate, and actionable information resulting from the planning, direction, collection, exploitation, processing, analysis, production, dissemination, evaluation, and feedback of available information concerning physical and cyber threats to the United States, its people, property, or interests; the development, proliferation, or use of WMDs; or any other matter bearing on U.S. national or homeland security by local, state, tribal, territorial, Federal, and other stakeholders. Information sharing is the ability to exchange intelligence, information, data, or knowledge among government or private sector entities, as appropriate.

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseInterdiction and Disruption

  • Mission Areas: Prevention, Protection
  • Description: Delay, divert, intercept, halt, apprehend, or secure threats and/or hazards.

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseScreening, Search, and Detection

  • Mission Areas: Prevention, Protection
  • Description: Identify, discover, or locate threats and/or hazards through active and passive surveillance and search procedures. This may include the use of systematic examinations and assessments, biosurveillance, sensor technologies, or physical investigation and intelligence.

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseAccess Control and Identity Verification

  • Mission Area: Protection
  • Description: Apply and support necessary physical, technological, and cyber measures to control admittance to critical locations and systems.

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseCybersecurity

  • Mission Area: Protection
  • Description: Protect (and if needed, restore) electronic communications systems, information, and services from damage, unauthorized use, and exploitation.

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapsePhysical Protective Measures

  • Mission Area: Protection
  • Description: Implement and maintain risk-informed countermeasures, and policies protecting people, borders, structures, materials, products, and systems associated with key operational activities and critical infrastructure sectors.

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseRisk Management for Protection Programs and Activities

  • Mission Area: Protection
  • Description: Identify, assess, and prioritize risks to inform Protection activities, countermeasures, and investments.

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseSupply Chain Integrity and Security

  • Mission Area: Protection
  • Description: Strengthen the security and resilience of the supply chain.

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseCommunity Resilience

  • Mission Area: Mitigation
  • Description: Enable the recognition, understanding, communication of, and planning for risk and empower individuals and communities to make informed risk management decisions necessary to adapt to, withstand, and quickly recover from future incidents.

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseLong-term Vulnerability Reduction

  • Mission Area: Mitigation
  • Description: Build and sustain resilient systems, communities, and critical infrastructure and key resources lifelines so as to reduce their vulnerability to natural, technological, and human-caused threats and hazards by lessening the likelihood, severity, and duration of the adverse consequences.

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseRisk and Disaster Resilience Assessment

  • Mission Area: Mitigation
  • Description: Assess risk and disaster resilience so that decision makers, responders, and community members can take informed action to reduce their entity’s risk and increase their resilience.

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseThreats and Hazards Identification

  • Mission Area: Mitigation
  • Description: Identify the threats and hazards that occur in the geographic area; determine the frequency and magnitude; and incorporate this into analysis and planning processes so as to clearly understand the needs of a community or entity.

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseCritical Transportation

  • Mission Area: Response
  • Description: Provide transportation (including infrastructure access and accessible transportation services) for response priority objectives, including the evacuation of people and animals, and the delivery of vital response personnel, equipment, and services into the affected areas.

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseEnvironmental Response/Health and Safety

  • Mission Area: Response
  • Description: Conduct appropriate measures to ensure the protection of the health and safety of the public and workers, as well as the environment, from all-hazards  in support of responder operations and the affected communities.

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseFatality Management Services

  • Mission Area: Response
  • Description: Provide fatality management services, including decedent remains recovery and victim identification, working with local, state, tribal, territorial, insular area, and Federal authorities to provide mortuary processes, temporary storage or permanent internment solutions, sharing information with mass care services for the purpose of reunifying family members and caregivers with missing persons/remains, and providing counseling to the bereaved.

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseFire Management and Suppression

  • Mission Area: Response
  • Description: Provide structural, wildland, and specialized firefighting capabilities to manage and suppress fires of all types, kinds, and complexities while protecting the lives, property, and the environment in the affected area.

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseInfrastructure Systems

  • Mission Area: Response, Recovery
  • Description: Stabilize critical infrastructure functions, minimize health and safety threats, and efficiently restore and revitalize systems and services to support a viable, resilient community.

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseLogistics and Supply Chain Management

  • Mission Area: Response
  • Description: Deliver essential commodities, equipment, and services in support of impacted communities and survivors, to include emergency power and fuel support, as well as the coordination of access to community staples. Synchronize logistics capabilities and enable the restoration of impacted supply chains.

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseMass Care Services

  • Mission Area: Response
  • Description: Provide life-sustaining and human services to the affected population, to include hydration, feeding, sheltering, temporary housing, evacuee support, reunification, and distribution of emergency supplies.

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseMass Search and Rescue Operations

  • Mission Area: Response
  • Description: Deliver traditional and atypical search and rescue capabilities, including personnel, services, animals, and assets to survivors in need, with the goal of saving the greatest number of endangered lives in the shortest time possible.

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseOn-scene Security, Protection, and Law Enforcement

  • Mission Area: Response
  • Description: Ensure a safe and secure environment through law enforcement and related security and protection operations for people and communities located within affected areas and also for response personnel engaged in lifesaving and life-sustaining operations.

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseOperational Communications

  • Mission Area: Response
  • Description: Ensure the capacity for timely communications in support of security, situational awareness, and operations by any and all means available, among and between affected communities in the impact area and all response forces.

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapsePublic Health, Healthcare, and Emergency Medical Services

  • Mission Area: Response
  • Description:  Provide lifesaving medical treatment via Emergency Medical Services and related operations and avoid additional disease and injury by providing targeted public health, medical, and behavioral health support, and products to all affected populations.

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseSituational Assessment

  • Mission Area: Response
  • Description: Provide all decision makers with decision-relevant information regarding the nature and extent of the hazard, any cascading effects, and the status of the response.

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseEconomic Recovery

  • Mission Area: Recovery
  • Description: Return economic and business activities (including food and agriculture) to a healthy state and develop new business and employment opportunities that result in an economically viable community.

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseHealth and Social Services

  • Mission Area: Recovery
  • Description: Restore and improve health and social services capabilities and networks to promote the resilience, independence, health (including behavioral health), and well-being of the whole community.

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseHousing

  • Mission Area: Recovery
  • Description: Implement housing solutions that effectively support the needs of the whole community and contribute to its sustainability and resilience.

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseNatural and Cultural Resources

  • Mission Area: Recovery
  • Description: Protect natural and cultural resources and historic properties through appropriate planning, mitigation, response, and recovery actions to preserve, conserve, rehabilitate, and restore them consistent with post-disaster community priorities and best practices and in compliance with applicable environmental and historic preservation laws and executive orders.

Wilson County, NC & Hurricane Matthew: The Aftermath

Image result for noaa hurricane matthew


By Olivia Neeley
The Wilson Daily Times

  • More than 530 Wilson County residents registered with the Federal Emergency Management Agency for assistance after Hurricane Matthew
  • The 530-plus individuals FEMA assisted received more than $640,000 disbursement in funds countywide.
  • The 911 Communications Center received 2,500 calls for service over the three-day period during and after Hurricane Matthew.
  • There were roughly 230 water rescues performed during the height of the storm, most of which were vehicles rescues and getting people out of houses that were threatened by water.
  • Two people were also killed in Wilson County as a result of moving water in the roadways. Their vehicles were swept away.

 


“The poorest of the poor in North Carolina are the ones who are being hurt the most by these floods,” Gov. Pat McCrory.

NY Times

“…..By Thursday, $2.6 million in aid from the Federal Emergency Management Agency had been disbursed and 14,000 people had applied for aid.

Individual assistance from FEMA, which has averaged about $2,000 a family in recent years, is designed to help with immediate needs — like temporary rental housing, repairs not covered by insurance, and the replacement of critical personal items — but those grants are somewhat limited…..”


September is National Preparedness Month: Don’t Wait. Communicate. Make Your Emergency Plan Today.

FEMA

Release date:
September 1, 2016
Release Number:
RV-NR-2016-10

CHICAGO –September is National Preparedness Month, and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) encourages everyone to make disaster preparedness a priority.

“National Preparedness Month serves as a reminder that we all need to prepare for disasters and emergencies,” said Andrew Velasquez III, FEMA Region V Administrator.  “Plan in advance so your family knows what to do if a disaster strikes: how you will get to a safe place; how you will contact one another; how you will get back together; and what you will do in different emergency situations.”

Severe weather and other emergencies can strike with little or no warning and can have disastrous impacts. Already this year, the Midwest has experienced several waves of destructive storms, tornadoes and flooding. Whether at home or on the go, be aware of emergency plans in place wherever your family spends their time: work, daycare and school, houses of worship, sports events and commuting. Be disaster ready, wherever you may be.

It’s simple to start planning for emergencies: download the Family Communication Plan for Parents and Kids onReady.gov/make-a-plan and fill out the sections before printing it or emailing it to your family and friends.  Consider also downloading the free FEMA app, available for your Android, Apple or Blackberry device, so you have the information at your fingertips to prepare for severe weather.

Throughout the month, FEMA will offer tips to help you be better prepared, including steps you can take to protect yourself and your family. Follow FEMA Region V online at twitter.com/femaregion5 and www.facebook.com/fema, to receive the latest preparedness updates.

For detailed information about how to be ready for severe weather in your area, including a list of items you will want to have in your emergency kit, visit www.ready.gov, or our Spanish site at www.listo.gov.

Follow FEMA online at twitter.com/femaregion5, www.facebook.com/fema, and www.youtube.com/fema.  Also, follow Administrator Craig Fugate’s activities at twitter.com/craigatfema. The social media links provided are for reference only. FEMA does not endorse any non-government websites, companies or applications.

 

FEMA’s mission is to support our citizens and first responders to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.

###


FEMA Daily Operations Briefing for Thursday, December 3, 2015

 Significant Events: None

Significant Weather:

Heavy snow and freezing rain possible – Northwestern U.S.

Rain and snow – Northern Maine

Heavy rain – South Florida

Red Flag Warnings: None

Critical/Elevated Fire Weather Areas: None

Space weather: Past 24 hours – None;

Next 24 hours – None predicted

Declaration Activity: None


FEMA Daily Operations Briefing for Friday, November 27, 2015

 

Significant Events: None

Tropical Activity:
Atlantic: Tropical cyclone activity is not expected during the next 48 hours
Eastern Pacific: Hurricane Sandra (Cat 2)
Central Pacific: Tropical cyclone activity not expected through Saturday evening
Western Pacific: Tropical Storm 03F

Significant Weather:
Snow – the Cascades, Central Plains, Central Rockies & Upper Mississippi Valley
Freezing rain – Central/Southern Plains
Flash Flooding – Southern/Central Plains
Rain – Southern Plains to the Middle Mississippi Valley and into the Great Lakes
Red Flag Warnings: None
Critical/Elevated Fire Weather Areas: NM & TX
Space weather: Past 24 hours – none, Next 24 hours – none

Declaration Activity:
Amendment No. 1 for American Samoa (FEMA-4192-DR)
Major Disaster Declaration (FEMA-4245-DR) for Texas

  • FEMA Daily Ops Briefing 11-27-2015:  http://content.govdelivery.com/attachments/USDHSFEMA/2015/11/27/file_attachments/453939/FEMA%2BDaily%2BOps%2BBriefing%2B11-27-2015.pdf

FEMA: Daily Operations Briefing for Monday, November 23, 2015

 

Significant Activity: Nov 22 – 23

Tropical Activity:

  • Atlantic: Tropical cyclone activity is not expected during the next 48 hours
  • Eastern Pacific: Disturbance 1(90%)
  • Central Pacific: Tropical cyclone activity not expected through Tuesday evening
  • Western Pacific: No activity affecting U.S. territories

Significant Weather:

  • Unseasonably cold – Southern Plains, Lower Mississippi Valley & Pacific Northwest
  • Wintery mix/Snow – Pacific Northwest, Central Great Basin, Great Lakes & Maine
  • Rain – Coastal Pacific Northwest, Southern Florida and portions of New England
  • Red Flag Warnings: None
  • Critical/Elevated Fire Weather Areas: None
  • Space weather: Past 24 hours – none, Next 24 hours – none

Declaration Activity:

  • Major Disaster Declaration Request – Texas

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