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National Level Exercise (NLE) 2018 to examine the ability of all levels of government, private industry, and nongovernmental organizations to protect against, respond to, and recover from a major Mid-Atlantic hurricane.

FEMA

National Level Exercise

National Level Exercise (NLE) 2018

The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) leads national-level exercises every two years. National Level Exercise (NLE) 2018 will examine the ability of all levels of government, private industry, and nongovernmental organizations to protect against, respond to, and recover from a major Mid-Atlantic hurricane. The scenario involves a major hurricane that makes landfall near Hampton Roads, Virginia, causing severe damage to residences, businesses, and critical infrastructure throughout the Mid-Atlantic. Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria last fall reinforced our need to prepare for hurricanes, and NLE 2018 provides a well-timed opportunity to apply lessons from those storms in advance of the 2018 Atlantic hurricane season, which begins on June 1.

Get Involved

There are many ways for individuals, businesses, and community organizations to participate in NLE 2018 and get better prepared for hurricanes. If you live or do business in an area vulnerable to hurricanes, it is important that you understand your risk, develop a preparedness and mitigation plan, and take action. Find resources to prepare for hurricanes below. Fact Sheets can be downloaded from anywhere you see this icon   or by clicking on the hyperlink.

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseFor Individuals

Threats from hurricanes include high winds, heavy rainfall, storm surge, coastal and inland flooding, rip currents, and tornadoes. The heavy winds of hurricanes can cause damage or destroy homes, buildings, and roads, as well as cause power, water, and gas outages. Watch FEMA’s “When the Waves Swell” video to understand your hurricane risk, then learn how to take action below.

Get Alerts and WarningsGet Alerts and Warnings

Receiving timely information about weather conditions or other emergency events can make all the difference in knowing when to take action to be safe.

  • Download the FEMA App to learn what to do before, during, and after emergencies, and receive weather alerts from the National Weather Service for up to five different locations anywhere in the United States.
  • Read FEMA’s Know Your Alerts and Warnings guide.
  • Visit your local county emergency management website to learn more about what notifications are available in your community.

Create and Test a Family Communication PlanCreate and Test a Family Communication Plan

Make a plan today. Your family may not be together if a disaster strikes, so it is important to know which types of disasters could affect your area. Know how you’ll contact one another and reconnect if separated. Establish a family meeting place that’s familiar and easy to find.

Document and Insure Property

When a disaster strikes, having insurance for your home or business property is the best way to ensure you will have the necessary financial resources to help you repair, rebuild, or replace whatever is damaged.

  • Get started with FEMA’s Document and Insure Your Property guide.
  • Consider buying flood insurance. Individuals can purchase flood insurance through an insurance agent or an insurer participating in the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). If your insurance agent does not sell flood insurance, you can contact the NFIP Referral Call Center at 1-800-427-4661 to request an agent referral.
  • Visit www.FloodSmart.gov to learn more about purchasing flood insurance and the National Flood Insurance Program.

Strengthen Your Financial PreparednessStrengthen Your Financial Preparedness

Know your disaster costs. Taking the time now to collect and secure personal financial, insurance, medical, and other records will give you peace of mind and, in the event of an emergency, will ensure that you have the documentation needed to start the recovery process without delay.

Get Trained

Minutes matter in a disaster, and if emergency responders aren’t nearby, you can be the help until help arrives. There are many ways to get involved in your community.

  • Visit ready.gov/until-help-arrives for online training and to find out what your role can be during disasters.
  • Contact your local emergency management office to find upcoming training, discussions, and events in your community.

Download the Individuals Fact Sheet

 

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseFor Businesses

Preparing for hurricanes and developing a plan will increase the safety of employees and customers and help you remain in business after disaster strikes. Maintaining business continuity is important. When you are able to continue operations after a disaster, you also improve your community’s ability to recover.

Participate in National Level Exercise 2018

Over 200 organizations, including all levels of government, private businesses, and nonprofit organizations, will participate in NLE 2018. Private sector participants should focus their play on May 3 and May 8-10, 2018. Participation options are available for all levels of play and businesses of all sizes. Businesses can also participate through National, Regional, and State Business Emergency Operations Centers.

The functional and full-scale portions of NLE 2018 will occur between April 30 and May 11, 2018.

Private sector participants should focus their play on NBEOC call dates (May 2-4 and May 7-9) and targeted private sector play (May 7-9). Participants from the infrastructure sector are encouraged to focus their play on May 8.

  • Contact nle@fema.dhs.gov to learn more about your options for participating in NLE 2018.

NLE 2018 Private Sector Capabilities and Objectives

Private and infrastructure sector participants will focus on testing the following capabilities during NLE 2018:

  • Information Sharing: Test the use of a benchmarking system to self-assess information sharing situational capabilities based on the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Incident Management Information Sharing (IMIS) Capability Maturity Model (CMM), as well as the ability to provide updates to the community regarding the status of operations.
  • Request, Acquisition, and Movement of Resources: Test the ability to identify and coordinate delivery of resources from private-to-government, government-to-private, and private-to-private requests, as well as the ability to transport resources through waivers and exemptions.
  • Business Emergency Operations Center (BEOC) Capabilities: NLE 2018 will test and evaluate the coordination capabilities of State, Regional, and National BEOCs.

Private sector participants are invited to set their own exercise objectives as they align to one of the following three categories:

  • Organization-Led: The objective is specific to what an individual company or organization wishes to achieve during the exercise.
  • Market-Segment: The objective is specific to a group of organizations or companies, such as small businesses, telecommunications companies, healthcare networks, or electric utilities.
  • Cross-Sector: The objective is specific to a group of market segments or sectors and aligned to interdependencies between those markets and/or sectors.

Conduct an Exercise Internal to Your BusinessConduct an Exercise Internal to Your Business

Conduct an exercise on your own using the NLE 2018 Exercise Starter Kit. This starter kit is an “exercise in a box,” and includes exercise templates, a detailed scenario, discussion questions, and scene-setting videos to help your business prepare for hurricanes.

Get Your Business Hurricane ReadyGet Your Business Hurricane Ready

Significant portions of the United States are at risk for the effects of tropical storms and hurricanes. It is important that organizations throughout the country, including associations, businesses, and community groups, understand the risks and potential impacts and prepare accordingly.

Join the National Business Emergency Operations CenterJoin the National Business Emergency Operations Center

The National Business Emergency Operations Center (NBEOC) is FEMA’s virtual clearinghouse for two-way information sharing between public and private sector stakeholders in preparing for, responding to, or recovering from disasters. Participation in the NBEOC is completely voluntary and open to all members of the private sector with a national footprint.

Spread the Preparedness Message with Your Employees and Customers

Help spread the word by sharing hurricane preparedness products with your employees and customers.

  • Share hurricane preparedness resources like our How to Get Involved fact sheet, which covers how to get alerts, insure property, strengthen your financial preparedness, and more.
  • Visit www.ready.gov/hurricanes for more information to share with your audience.

Download the Private Sector and Infrastructure Fact Sheet

 

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseFor Community Organizations

Preparing for hurricanes and developing a plan will increase the safety of your membership and help your organization remain open after disaster strikes.  When you are able to continue operations after a disaster, you also improve your community’s ability to recover.

Spread the Preparedness Message with Your Membership

Help spread the word to your membership, partners, and immediate community.

  • Share hurricane preparedness resources like our How to Get Involved fact sheet, which covers how to get alerts, insure property, strengthen your financial preparedness, and more.

Get Your Organization Hurricane Ready

Significant portions of the United States are at risk for the effects of tropical storms and hurricanes. It is important that organizations throughout the country understand the risks and potential impacts and prepare accordingly.

Engage with National Level Exercise 2018

Over 200 organizations, including all levels of government, private businesses, and nonprofit organizations, will participate in NLE 2018 between April 30 and May 11, 2018. Organizations of all sizes can participate by attending a national webinar on Hurricane Preparedness on Tuesday, May  8, 2018 from 2:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. EDT.

  • To RSVP for the webinar, e-mail Partnerships@fema.dhs.gov with “Hurricane Webinar” in the subject line.
  • You can also get involved by conducting an exercise on your own using the NLE 2018 Exercise Starter Kit. This starter kit is an “exercise in a box,” and includes exercise templates, a detailed scenario, discussion questions, and scene-setting videos to help your organization prepare for hurricane season.

Join the National Voluntary Organizations Active in Disasters (NVOAD)

National VOAD is an association of organizations that mitigate and alleviate the impact of disasters; provide a forum promoting cooperation, communication, coordination, and collaboration; and foster more effective delivery of services to communities affected by disaster.

Download the Community Organizations Fact Sheet

 

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseFor Government

If your department or agency is not yet participating in NLE 2018 and is interested in joining, please contact nle@fema.dhs.gov to learn more about your options for participation.

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseAbout the National Level Exercise

The functional and full-scale portions of NLE 2018 will occur in the first two weeks of May 2018, focused on thematic areas identified from ongoing real-world continuous improvement efforts. This provides a well-timed opportunity to apply lessons observed in advance of the 2018 hurricane season. The NLE as a whole should be viewed as a large exercise series running from January through the summer, which will include seminars, workshops, and tabletop exercises, as well as the functional exercise in May.

A number of local, state, and federal exercises have been integrated into NLE 2018 which include: Atlantic Fury FEMA Region III (DC, VA, MD, PA, DE, WV), Vigilant Guard 18-3 (Virginia National Guard Bureau), Vigilant Guard 18-4 (Maryland National Guard Bureau), Eagle Horizon (FEMA National Continuity Programs), Clear Path (U.S. Department of Energy), Ardent Sentry (U.S. Northern Command), Citadel Gale/HURREX (U.S. Navy), Fifth District Hurricane Exercise (U.S. Coast Guard), and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Hurricane Exercise.

A common exercise scenario and control environment will bring together each of these components into one unified exercise.

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseNLE 2018 Objectives

NLE 2018 consists of four overarching exercise objectives:

1. Pre-landfall Protective Actions:

Examine and validate the capabilities of federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial governments, as well as private industry, nongovernmental organizations, community organizations, and members of the public, to take coordinated and inclusive protective actions prior to a projected major hurricane landfall in accordance with applicable plans, policies, and procedures.

2. Sustained Response in Parallel with Recovery Planning: 

Demonstrate and assess the ability of federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial governments, in coordination with private sector, philanthropic, and nongovernmental partners, to conduct inclusive post-hurricane landfall response operations and simultaneously conduct inclusive recovery planning activities.

3. Continuity in a Natural Disaster: 

Demonstrate and assess the ability of federal and non-federal government organizations to implement continuity plans and perform essential functions appropriate for incident conditions to sustain National Essential Function (NEF) 6.

4. Power Outages and Critical Interdependencies: 

Examine and validate the capabilities of federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial governments to support the energy sector and synchronize efforts to manage the consequences of long-duration power outages and critical interdependencies.

Scenario

The NLE 2018 scenario will include a major hurricane that makes landfall near Hampton Roads, Virginia, causing severe damage to residences, businesses, and critical infrastructure throughout the Mid-Atlantic region. The scenario will include power outages and cascading effects to critical infrastructure systems, including impacts to communications, transportation, water, wastewater, and hospital systems.

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapsePromoting National Level Exercise 2018

NLE 2018 is helping to Build a Culture of Preparedness and to Ready the Nation for Catastrophic Disasters. All organizations are welcome to promote NLE 2018 and the National Flood Insurance Program by using customizable templates and information developed to assist in communicating the preparedness message to the community or your organization.

  • The National Flood Insurance Program Outreach Toolkit can be used to educate residents about the importance of preparing for a hurricane with flood insurance. The toolkit consists of key messages and templates that can be customized for specific communities or media markets.

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapseBackground

The National Preparedness Goal calls for a secure and resilient nation with the capabilities required across the whole community to prevent, protect against, mitigate, respond to, and recover from the threats and hazards that pose the greatest risk. To achieve the National Preparedness Goal, the National Preparedness System organizes actions to build, sustain, and deliver the core capabilities in greatest need of sustainment and improvement. As a key component of the National Preparedness System, the National Exercise Program (NEP) is the principal mechanism for examining and validating core capabilities nationwide across all preparedness mission areas. The NEP consists of a two-year, progressive cycle of selected exercises across the whole community anchored to a common set of strategic objectives that culminates in a biennial National Level Exercise. The National Level Exercise serves as the capstone event of the two-year NEP cycle.

The National Level Exercise is congressionally mandated in the Post-Katrina Emergency Management Reform Act of 2006, which states that “the Administrator [of FEMA] shall periodically, but not less than biennially, perform national exercises . . . to test and evaluate the capability of Federal, State, Local, and Tribal governments to detect, disrupt, and prevent threatened or actual catastrophic acts of terrorism, especially those involving weapons of mass destruction,” and “to test and evaluate the readiness of Federal, State, local, and tribal governments to respond and recover in a coordinated and unified manner to catastrophic incidents.” (United States Code, Title 6, Chapter 2, Subchapter II, Part A, Section 748(b)(3).)

This section is Expanded. Click to CollapsePast National Level Exercises

Capstone 2016

Capstone Exercise 2016 examined authorities and capabilities needed to ensure our nation’s ability to prevent terrorist acts against the homeland, coordinate the response to a catastrophic incident, communicate to the American people, and continue performing essential government functions during a disaster. Capstone 2016 involved a series of five events. The exercise began with an analysis of threats originating abroad and then transitioned into a domestic crisis management and emergency response exercise. (Read the press release)

Capstone 2014

Capstone Exercise 2014 was a complex emergency preparedness exercise comprised of five distinct, but linked, component events. The Alaska Shield 2014 exercise, sponsored by the State of Alaska to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the 1964 Great Alaskan Earthquake, provided the central scenario elements: significant damage from both the quake and the tsunami it triggers affect the greater Pacific Northwest. Capstone Exercise 2014 included several preparedness activities sponsored by other departments and agencies and was designed to educate and prepare the whole community for complex, large-scale disasters and emergencies.

National Level Exercise 2012

NLE 2012 was a series of exercise events that examined the ability of the United States to execute a coordinated response to a series of significant cyber incidents. NLE 2012 emphasized the shared responsibility among all levels of government, the private sector, and the international community to secure cyber networks and coordinate response and recovery actions. NLE 2012 was focused on examining four major themes: planning and implementation of the draft National Cyber Incident Response Plan (NCIRP), coordination among governmental entities, information sharing, and decision making.

 

Last Updated:
04/24/2018 – 13:41

FEMA’s report on the Kilauea eruption in Hawaii (May 8, 2018)

Situation On May 3, a lava flow broke to the surface in lower Puna on the Big Island of HI.

Since the onset of this eruption, a total of 12 fissures have emerged.

Multiple earthquakes/aftershocks of magnitude 2.5 or higher recorded in the past week; but earthquake activity has diminished by approximately 33% from May 6

Impacts

• Evacuations: 1,650 residents of Leilani Estates & Lanipuna Gardens (775 homes) under mandatory evacuation; Leilani Estates allowed limited, short-term reentry

• Shelters: 2 shelters open / 147 occupants (Region IX Update #5 as of 6:37 p.m. EDT May 7)

• Damage: 35 homes destroyed; no major damage to critical infrastructure (CIKR)

• Temporary Flight Restrictions for non-relief aircraft operations extended to May 15

• Pahoa-Pahoiki road closed from Highway 132 to Highway 137

State / Local Response

• HI EOC at Partial Activation

• Governor declared State of Emergency & activated HI National Guard

• State is working to restore water service to neighborhoods near the fissures

FEMA Response

• FEMA Region IX RWC & Pacific Area Watch at Steady State; continue to monitor

• Four FEMA Region IX LNOs deployed to HI EOC & Hawai‘i County Civil Defense

• N-IMAT East 1 at Region IX; deploying to Hawai‘i County over the next two days

• FEMA NWC is monitoring


After Maria, FEMA awarded Tiffany Brown, an Atlanta entrepreneur with no experience in large-scale disaster relief and at least five canceled government contracts in her past, $156 million for 30 million meals for Puerto Ricans. 50,000 were delivered.

NY Times

“…..In November, The Associated Press found that after Hurricane Maria, FEMA awarded more than $30 million in contracts for emergency tarps and plastic sheeting to a company that never delivered the needed supplies…..”

 


America’s Survival Food King: 300 calorie, Mylar-packed meals like Savory Stroganoff cost less than $1 and can last for decades, with 90% of nutrients intact.

Bloomberg

“…..FEMA was running low on food rations. In the previous four weeks, the agency had supplied millions of meals to the Texans and South Floridians displaced by hurricanes Harvey and Irma. Maria had created a third disaster zone with more complex logistics, having knocked out Puerto Rico’s electricity, gutted its roads, and destroyed its markets and ports. Restoring food security on the island could take months. Lee had to procure millions of servings of just-add-water meals to sustain the victims. Could Jackson provide at least 2 million and begin deliveries immediately?….”

  • Mylar pouches of freeze-dried meals such as Savory Stroganoff and Loaded Baked Potato Casserole
  • Designed to remain edible on shelves for a quarter century.

Wise Company


FEMA: 3,000 residents of Puerto Rico still living in shelters to be sheltered in New York and Florida

NY Times

“…..The Federal Emergency Management Agency said that it was finalizing extraordinary plans to fly about 3,000 residents of Puerto Rico still living in shelters to New York and Florida.

“Transportation assistance is something that I don’t think we have done previously,” Will Booher, a FEMA spokesman, said. “But this is unique to what’s going on in Puerto Rico.” The agency said the relief effort was being undertaken at the request of Gov. Ricardo Rosselló.

FEMA regularly finds housing for hurricane victims, often at hotels or motels nearby. But because there is so little available lodging on the island, and no easy way to get people from shelters to safe housing, the agency is arranging charter flights for residents, beginning with those still in shelters…..”


Texas & Florida: Still waiting for FEMA

NY Times

“…..one of the busiest hurricane seasons in years has overwhelmed federal disaster officials. As a result, the government’s response in the two biggest affected states — Texas and Florida — has been scattershot: effective in dealing with immediate needs, but unreliable and at times inadequate in handling the aftermath, as thousands of people face unusually long delays in getting basic disaster assistance…..One of the most significant problems FEMA has had in Texas and Florida is the backlog in getting damaged properties inspected. Contract inspectors paid by the agency must first inspect and verify the damage in order for residents to be approved for thousands of dollars in aid. FEMA does not have enough inspectors to reduce the backlog, and the average wait for an inspection is 45 days in Texas and about a month in Florida, agency officials said…….”


Today’s FEMA SitRep on Puerto Rico and USVI after the hurricanes

FEMA Sit Rep

Puerto Rico

• Shelters: 92 shelters open with 4,154 (-102) occupants
• Disaster Assistance Registrations: 792k Power Outages / Restoration
• 21.6% (+5%) of customers with power restored
• 25.4% of transmission lines energized; 36.5% substations energized
• Generator failure reported in Centro Medico; emergency generators to be installed
• PREPA estimating 95% to be restored by December 15
Communications:
• 85% (+24) of population live in areas where wireless coverage is available for voice and text messages
Health & Medical
• 61 (-2) of 67 hospitals open
• 2 Federal Medical Stations operational Water Restoration
• 72% of PRASA customers have potable water service
• 65 water filter plants are operating
Guajataca Dam
• Water has stopped flowing over spillway; reservoir pool is 4 feet below spillway; there is no longer any seepage noted under spillway slabs
U.S. Virgin Islands
• Shelters: 5 shelters open with 290 (-17) occupants
• Disaster Assistance Registrations: 14.9k
Power Outages / Restoration
Customers receiving power from grid: St. Thomas: 29% St. Croix: 1.6%; St. John: no grid power, restoration expected in 2-3 weeks Communications:
• 88% of population lives in area where wireless coverage is available for voice and text
Health & Medical
St. Thomas: Schneider Medical Center sustained damage; established mobile medical facility
• St. Croix: Charles Harwood Facility closed; Governor Juan Luis Hospital partially open despite damage
FEMA Response
• NRCC: Modified Level III (day shift, 8:00 am – 6:00 pm EDT)
National IMAT East-1 & 2, & Region III IMAT deployed to PR
• FEMA Region II & X IMATs: deployed to USVI • MERS teams deployed to both USVI & PR

Puerto Rico and U.S. Virgin Islands Need Urgent Aid Now to Avert Public Health Crises

ISDA

“…..Infectious disease risks in the wake of these hurricanes include exposures to waterborne pathogens, the spread of infections in crowded shelters, food-borne illnesses, mosquito-borne infections and mold-related illnesses. Reliable access to medicines for patients with HIV and tuberculosis is also critical to preventing treatment disruptions that increase patients’ risks of serious illness, disease progression, and to avoid the emergence of drug-resistance or transmission of these infections.  Health workers in the affected areas struggle with shortages of antibiotics and hydration solutions, and they are bracing for potential infectious disease outbreaks.  Ensuring that basic needs are met including access to clean water, safe food and sanitation as essential for infection control. …..”

Pinpointing Where the Lights Went Out in Puerto Rico

The images above show lighting around San Juan, capital of the commonwealth; the images below show the entire island. One image in each pair shows a typical night before Maria made landfall, based upon cloud-free and low moonlight conditions; the second image is a composite that shows light detected by VIIRS on the nights of September 27 and 28, 2017. By compositing two nights, the image has fewer clouds blocking the view. (Note: some clouds still blocked light emissions during the two nights, especially across southeastern and western Puerto Rico.) The images above show widespread outages around San Juan, including key hospital and transportation infrastructure.

 

 


EPA is continuing to coordinate with local governments in Puerto Rico and the USVI to assess the conditions of drinking water.

EPA

EPA Hurricane Maria Update for Wednesday, October 11th

10/11/2017
Contact Information: 

WASHINGTON (October 11, 2017) — The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) continues to coordinate closely with federal, commonwealth, territory, and local partners as the Agency responds to the impact of Hurricane Maria. EPA is focused on environmental impacts and potential threats to human health as well as the safety of those in the affected areas.  EPA is continuing to coordinate with local governments in Puerto Rico and the USVI to assess the conditions of drinking water, which includes sampling, analysis and lab support, and getting wastewater treatment systems up and running. EPA’s missions also include oil and chemical spill response, oil and chemical facility assessments and debris management.

There are reports of residents obtaining, or trying to obtain, drinking water from wells at hazardous waste “Superfund” sites in Puerto Rico.  EPA advises against tampering with sealed and locked wells or drinking from these wells, as it may be dangerous to people’s health.

EPA has collaborated with FEMA and the Department of Defense on a video documenting our drinking water assessment teams’ work. The video shows EPA teams at sites in Caguas and Yabucoa, Puerto Rico that are without power and need generators to get up and running. EPA is working with FEMA and local municipalities to get the drinking water wells functioning.

EPA and partners assessing non-PRASA drinking water system, Cañabón, Puerto Rico. EPA and partners assessing non-PRASA drinking water system, Cañabón, Puerto Rico. Photo courtesy of EPA.

EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt, at the request of Puerto Rico Governor Ricardo Rosselló and in consultation with U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Rick Perry, today waived certain parts of the Clean Air Act to allow for the continued use of heating oil and marine fuel designated for use in Emission Control Areas that exceed the 15 parts per million sulfur standard for mobile non-road generators and pumps used for emergency purposes in Puerto Rico. This waiver is effective immediately and will continue through October 30, 2017. Any non-ultra low sulfur diesel fuel authorized under this waiver and remaining in a mobile non-road generator or pump after October 30, 2017, may continue to be used until the fuel has been consumed

Personnel
EPA continues to deploy personnel to Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands as conditions allow. As of October 10, 2017:

  • About 236 personnel are currently involved in hurricane response efforts.
  • About 48 personnel are on the ground in USVI to assist with response efforts.
  • About 89 personnel are on the ground in Puerto Rico to assist with response efforts.

Debris Management
EPA continues to work with FEMA, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Puerto Rico and USVI governments on debris management. EPA will assist with the handling and disposal of orphan containers, household hazardous waste, medical waste and e-waste. EPA plans to conduct air monitoring at collection areas and during all hazardous materials operations.

Marine Operations
EPA is working with the US Coast Guard on marine operations to assess sunken vessels on the eastern coast of Puerto Rico and USVI. Teams will locate and evaluate the condition of sunken vessels and assist with the disposal of recovered oil and hazardous materials.

Assessment of Superfund Sites, Oil Sites and Regulated Facilities
EPA continues to re-assess Superfund sites, oil sites, and chemical facilities in both Puerto Rico and the USVI to determine if the sites were affected by Hurricane Maria and if there is a potential for contamination to cause off-site impacts.

Drinking Water and Wastewater Management
In USVI, EPA continues to coordinate drinking water sampling with the U.S. Virgin Islands Department of Natural Resources. In Puerto Rico, the EPA continues to focus on assessing both drinking water and wastewater systems and continues to work closely with the government of Puerto Rico.

Water Safety
Raw sewage continues to be released into waterways and is expected to continue until repairs can be made and power is restored. Water contaminated with livestock waste, human sewage, chemicals, and other contaminants can lead to illness when used for drinking, bathing, and other hygiene activities. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), people should not use the water from rivers, streams and coastal water to drink, bathe, wash, or to cook with unless first boiling this water for a minimum of one minute. If boiling the water is not possible, water may be disinfected with bleach. To learn more about making water safe in an emergency, go to CDC’s Making Water Safe in an Emergency web page.

For information and updates, visit: https://www.epa.gov/hurricane-maria.


FEMA SitRep: California Wildfires (10/12/17)

FEMA

Current Situation 18 large fires burning (FMAGs issued for 10) across 150k acres of state and private land.

Impacts: • 24 confirmed fatalities (CalOES law enforcement) • Approximately 106k people under Mandatory Evacuations • 36,513 (+3,100) homes threatened; 94 (+44) damaged / 1,313 (+168) destroyed •

Within existing fire perimeters: Population 26,270, 2 mobile home parks, 12 schools, 10 emergency medical services, 10 fire stations, 5 NSS shelters, 13 nursing homes, 3 cell towers •

50k customers without power and 36k without gas

(FEMA Reg IX) State/Local Response: • Governor declared a state of emergency in Napa, Sonoma, Butte, Lake, Solano, Mendocino, Nevada, Orange, and Yuba counties • CA EOC at Partial Activation • 59 Red Cross and independent shelters open with 5,117 (+2.8k) occupants (ESF-6 as of 3:30 a.m. EDT) FEMA Response: • DR-4344-CA and 10 FMAGs approved • Region IX IMAT-1 & LNO deployed to CA EOC • Staging Area established at Travis AFB


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