Global & Disaster Medicine

Archive for the ‘Candida auris’ Category

The United States: 126 confirmed cases of Candida auris as of Aug 31.

September 18, 2017: Case Count Updated as of August 31, 2017

Candida auris is an emerging fungus that presents a serious global health threat. C. auris causes severe illness in hospitalized patients in several countries, including the United States. Patients can remain colonized with C. auris for a long time and C. auris can persist on surfaces in healthcare environments. This can result in spread of C. auris between patients in healthcare facilities.

Most C. auris cases in the United States have been detected in the New York City area and New Jersey. Strains of C. auris in the United States have been linked to other parts of the world. U.S. C. auris cases are a result of inadvertent introduction into the United States from a patient who recently received healthcare in a country where C. auris has been reported or a result of local spread after such an introduction.

Please note that as of September 18, 2017, the total case counts reported include both probable and confirmed clinical cases; previously reported case counts included only confirmed cases. Case counts for some states are quite a bit higher than those listed before September 18, 2017 because of the change in reporting, and not because of a large increase in new cases. Read more below about how cases are defined.

U.S. Map: Clinical cases of Candida auris reported by state, United States, as of August 31, 2017

Clinical cases of C. auris reported in the United States as of August 31, 2017. States counts are listed in the below table.Cases are categorized by the state where the specimen was collected. Most probable cases were identified when laboratories with current cases of C. auris reviewed past microbiology records for C. auris. Isolates were not available for confirmation. Early detection of C. auris is essential for containing its spread in healthcare facilities.

Table: Clinical cases of Candida auris reported by state, United States, as of August 31, 2017

State Number and type of clinical Candida auris cases reported
Confirmed Probable
California 1 0
Connecticut 1 0
Florida 2 0
Illinois 4 0
Indiana 1 0
Maryland 1 0
Massachusetts 3 0
New Jersey 26 23
New York 86 4
Oklahoma 1 0
TOTAL 126 27

Beyond the clinical case counts reported above, an additional 143 patients have been found to be colonized with C. auris by targeted screening in four states with clinical cases.

CDC will update case counts monthly.

Single cases of C. auris have been reported from Canada, Germany, Japan, Kuwait, and Norway. Multiple cases of C. auris have been reported from Colombia, India, Israel, Kenya, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, South Korea, South Africa, Spain, the United Kingdom, the United States (primarily from New York City Metropolitan Area and New Jersey) and Venezuela; in some of these countries, extensive transmission of C. auris has been documented in more than one hospital. U.S. cases of C. auris have been found in patients who had recent stays in healthcare facilities in India, Pakistan, South Africa and Venezuela, which also have documented transmission.


Candida auris is an emerging fungus that presents a serious global health threat.

CDC

August 21, 2017: Case Count Updated as of July 31, 2017

Candida auris is an emerging fungus that presents a serious global health threat. Healthcare facilities in several countries have reported that C. auris has caused severe illness in hospitalized patients. Some strains of C. auris are resistant to all three major classes of antifungal drugs. This type of multidrug resistance has not been seen before in other species of Candida. Also of concern, C. auris can persist on surfaces in healthcare environments and spread between patients in healthcare facilities. CDC has developed identification(https://www.cdc.gov/fungal/diseases/candidiasis/recommendations.html), treatment(https://www.cdc.gov/fungal/diseases/candidiasis/c-auris-treatment.html), and infection control(https://www.cdc.gov/fungal/diseases/candidiasis/c-auris-infection-control.html) recommendations to help prevent the spread of C. auris.

CDC encourages all U.S. laboratory staff who identify C. auris to notify their state or local public health authorities and CDC at candidaauris@cdc.gov.

Candida auris cases in the United States

Location represents the state of C. auris specimen collection. The case counts displayed reflect clinical cases of C. auris (i.e., based on specimens collected in the normal course of care). They do not include patients who screened for presence of C. auris colonization. C. auris has been isolated from an additional 120 patients from healthcare facilities in 4 states where clinical cases were detected.  This map will be updated monthly.

Publications

CDC Publications:
Candida auris reported from other countries:

India

Israel

Japan

Kuwait

South Afria

South Korea

Spain

United Kingdom

Venezuela

Recommendations from other countries
Laboratory aspects of Candida auris
Other publications

Candida auris: 61 cases of the fungus have been reported in the U.S. since 2013

CDC

Candida auris is an emerging fungus that presents a serious global health threat. Healthcare facilities in several countries have reported that C. auris has caused severe illness in hospitalized patients. Some strains of Candida auris are resistant to all three major classes of antifungal drugs. This type of multidrug resistance has not been seen before in other species of Candida. Also of concern, C. auris can persist on surfaces in healthcare environments and spread between patients in healthcare facilities, unlike most other Candida species. CDC has developed Interim Recommendations(https://www.cdc.gov/fungal/diseases/candidiasis/recommendations.html) to help prevent the spread of C. auris.

C. auris is difficult to identify with standard laboratory methods and can be misidentified in labs without specific technology. CDC encourages all U.S. laboratory staff who identify C. auris strains to notify their state or local public health authorities and CDC at candidaauris@cdc.gov. Find answers to frequently asked questions about C. auris on our questions and answers page(https://www.cdc.gov/fungal/diseases/candidiasis/candida-auris-qanda.html) and in the Candida auris: Interim Recommendations(https://www.cdc.gov/fungal/diseases/candidiasis/recommendations.html).

CDC is working with state and local health departments to identify and investigate cases of C. auris. The following map displays where C. auris cases have been identified in the United States as of April 13, 2017.

Data Tableexpandcollapse


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