Global & Disaster Medicine

Archive for the ‘Women issues’ Category

Mozambique’s mothers after 2 typhoons

AlJazeera

“….More than 1.8 million people have struggled to recover from the damaging cyclones, but Mozambique’s mothers might be the most in need of help.

Mothers who need to have their babies weighed, immunised or measured, have to consult with doctors outdoors.

A temporary unit for gynaecological examinations and assisted procedures has been set up by the medical charity, Doctors Without Borders, known by its French initials MSF, but a better-equipped structure is urgently needed at this rural hospital where on average 120 women give birth each month…..

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), it is critical for lactating mothers to have energy and protein-rich foods during emergencies to ensure a baby is breastfed well.

“Breastfeeding is the best protection against diseases. Breastfed babies face much less risk of illness than babies who are not breastfed and, if they are sick, the duration of their illness is usually less,” Dr Nellia Mutisse, a specialist in child health with WHO Mozambique……”

 


Menstrual Sheds in Nepal

NPR

“…..Every year in Nepal, women die while sleeping in a shed outside their home because they are on their period. The cause of death is often smoke inhalation from lighting a fire to stay warm.

The practice, called chaupadi….”


Maternal and neonatal mortality is high in Africa. Why?

Lancet

Volume 7, ISSUE 4,
Pe513-e522, April 01, 2019
Maternal and neonatal outcomes after caesarean delivery in the African Surgical Outcomes Study: a 7-day prospective observational cohort study

“…….Findings

Between February, 2016, and May, 2016, 3792 patients were recruited from hospitals across Africa. 3685 were included in the postoperative complications analysis (107 missing data) and 3684 were included in the maternal mortality analysis (108 missing data). These hospitals had a combined number of specialist surgeons, obstetricians, and anaesthetists totalling 0·7 per 100 000 population (IQR 0·2–2·0). Maternal mortality was 20 (0·5%) of 3684 patients (95% CI 0·3–0·8). Complications occurred in 633 (17·4%) of 3636 mothers (16·2–18·6), which were predominantly severe intraoperative and postoperative bleeding (136 [3·8%] of 3612 mothers). Maternal mortality was independently associated with a preoperative presentation of placenta praevia, placental abruption, ruptured uterus, antepartum haemorrhage (odds ratio 4·47 [95% CI 1·46–13·65]), and perioperative severe obstetric haemorrhage (5·87 [1·99–17·34]) or anaesthesia complications (11·47 (1·20–109·20]). Neonatal mortality was 153 (4·4%) of 3506 infants (95% CI 3·7–5·0)……..”

Pakistan has the highest infant mortality rate in the world


More than 303,500 women – 99 percent of them in developing countries – died during childbirth in 2015, according to the World Health Organization. In addition, some 2.7 million babies died in their first month, mainly from complications during pregnancy or childbirth.

Maternal-Infant Mortality

“……Hemorrhages, high blood pressure and infections accounted for three-fourths of maternal deaths.….”


Thousands of woman are abducted and forced to marry each year in Kyrgyzstan where bride kidnappings continue, particularly in rural areas.

Thompson Reuters


Afghanistan’s worst drought in decades has driven tens of thousands of people from their homes and is pushing families to marry off their children in exchange for dowries in order to survive.

Thompson Reuters


‘Vacation Cutting’

TRF

“….Girls in Kenya are being taken across the border to countries such as Uganda, Tanzania, Somalia and Ethiopia for female genital mutilation (FGM) to avoid a crackdown on the harmful traditional practice at home, campaigners said on Monday.
Kenya criminalized FGM in 2011 with a minimum punishment of three years imprisonment and a U.S. $2,000 fine….”


10 brilliant technological innovations to save moms and babies

For many mothers and babies around the world, the first 48 hours after birth are the most dangerous of their lives. For eight years, Saving Lives at Birth—spearheaded by USAID—has challenged problem solvers worldwide to create innovative solutions to make birth safer and save lives.


A “dramatic increase” in sexual violence occurred in late November, as about 125 women and girls walking to a food distribution site in Bentiu were “raped, whipped and clubbed.”

NYT


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