Global & Disaster Medicine

Archive for the ‘Historical’ Category

1/15/1919: Molasses burst from a huge tank flooding the streets of Boston, killing 21 people and injuring scores of others.

History Channel

  • A 58-foot-high tank filled with 2.5 million gallons of crude molasses.
  • The bolts holding the bottom of the tank exploded, shooting out like bullets
  • Hot molasses rushed out.
  • An eight-foot-high wave of molasses swept away the freight cars and caved in the building’s doors and windows.

 


1/13/1982: An Air Florida Boeing 727 plunges into the Potomac River in Washington, D.C., killing 78 people.

History Channel

 


Just before 5 p.m. on Jan. 12, 2010, a 7.0M earthquake upended Haiti, killing more than 300,000 people by some estimates and destroying hundreds of thousands of homes.

Washington Post

 


1/10/1962: An avalanche on the slopes of the extinct volcano, Mount Huascaran, kills more than 4,000 people in Peru.

History Channel

 

 


1//2/1971: 66 football fans are killed in a stampede at a stadium in Glasgow, Scotland, as they attempt to leave a game after a late goal by the home team, simply a crush of spectators all leaving at the same time on the same stairway

History


12/30/1903: The deadliest theater fire in U.S. history as a fire in the Iroquois Theater in Chicago, Illinois, kills more than 600 people

History Channel

“…..Blocked fire exits and the lack of a fire-safety plan caused most of the deaths…..”


Dec. 21, 1988: A terrorist bomb exploded aboard Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland, killing 270 people.


Pneumonic Plague in Johannesburg, South Africa, 1904

EID

Volume 24, Number 1—January 2018

Historical Review

Evans CM, Egan JR, Hall I. Pneumonic Plague in Johannesburg, South Africa, 1904. Emerg Infect Dis. 2018;24(1):95-102. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2401.161817

Pneumonic Plague in Johannesburg, South Africa, 1904

Charles M. EvansComments to Author , Joseph R. Egan, and Ian Hall
Author affiliations: University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK (C.M. Evans); Public Health England, Wiltshire, UK (J.R. Egan, I. Hall)

Main Article

Figure 3

Incidence of the 4 types of plague over the duration of the epidemic in Johannesburg, South Africa, from week ending January 2 to week ending June 16, 1904.

Figure 3. Incidence of the 4 types of plague over the duration of the epidemic in Johannesburg, South Africa, from week ending January 2 to week ending June 16, 1904.

Figure 4

A) Deaths per day resulting from primary pneumonic plague in Johannesburg, South Africa, March 7–31, 1904. B) Back-calculated number of case-patients experiencing symptom onset. Circles represent most likely values; error bars represent 95% CIs. C) Transmissibility of primary pneumonic plague as measured by reproduction number, Rt. Circles represent the most likely values, error bars represent 95% CIs, and shaded polygons represent the period over which Rt was estimated. Uncertainty in the back-

Figure 4. A) Deaths per day resulting from primary pneumonic plague in Johannesburg, South Africa, March 7–31, 1904. B) Back-calculated number of case-patients experiencing symptom onset. Circles represent most likely values; error bars represent 95% CIs. C) Transmissibility of primary pneumonic plague as measured by reproduction number, Rt. Circles represent the most likely values, error bars represent 95% CIs, and shaded polygons represent the period over which Rt was estimated. Uncertainty in the back-calculated incidence has not been accounted for in the transmission estimates, which means that the variations in the time-varying Rt are probably underestimated because the incidence curve is smoothed out somewhat by the back-calculation process (and also reduced slightly because of rounding to the nearest integer). However, because the 7-day sliding window has the effect of smoothing out the Rt estimates in any case, not accounting for the uncertainty in the back-calculation probably has a limited effect on panel C results.


11/14/2012: A 20-year-old man shoots and kills his mother at their Newtown, Connecticut, home then drives to nearby Sandy Hook Elementary School, where he kills 20 first graders and six school employees before turning a gun on himself.

History Channel

NY Times

 


December 7, 1941: Lest we forget


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